Games are good for children

Children's foundation raises money for portable videogame centers

For all the age-old arguments about videogames doing more harm than good for kids, teenagers and hell, just about anyone who picks up a controller, it pleases us immensely to hear when games are helping children in need. Our good friends over at Next Generation are reporting that the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences is sponsoring a fundraiser with the Starlight Starbright Children’s Foundation to build portable videogame centers for hospitals.

“We are overjoyed to support this great program that provides young patients with entertainment, excitement and even a distraction during their exhaustive treatments and long hospital stays,” said AIAS president Joseph Olin.

Each unitwill betricked out with flat screen TVs, DVD players, Nintendo systems and an almost dizzying array of entertainment for children in need of smiling.

The slight downside is that the fundraiser isn’t open to the general public, because we’d be all over that. Instead, the AIAS will donate $1 for every vote made by Academy members for the 2007 Interactive Achievement Awards. For more information, check out thearticle, and here’s hoping the children get what they need and deserve.

January 22, 2007

For all the age-old arguments about videogames doing more harm than good for kids, teenagers and hell, just about anyone who picks up a controller, it pleases us immensely to hear when games are helping children in need. Our good friends over at Next Generation are reporting that the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences is sponsoring a fundraiser with the Starlight Starbright Children’s Foundation to build portable videogame centers for hospitals.

“We are overjoyed to support this great program that provides young patients with entertainment, excitement and even a distraction during their exhaustive treatments and long hospital stays,” said AIAS president Joseph Olin.

Each unitwill betricked out with flat screen TVs, DVD players, Nintendo systems and an almost dizzying array of entertainment for children in need of smiling.

The slight downside is that the fundraiser isn’t open to the general public, because we’d be all over that. Instead, the AIAS will donate $1 for every vote made by Academy members for the 2007 Interactive Achievement Awards. For more information, check out thearticle, and here’s hoping the children get what they need and deserve.

January 22, 2007

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