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30 best PC games to play right now

(Image credit: Supergiant Games)

September has been a month full of great new PC games – some of which were so great you can now find them in your list of the 30 best PC games of all time. Plenty of interesting smaller games await to ring in another autumn of gaming – traditionally the colder months of the year are the best time to stay inside and play. So if you’re looking for the best games, look no further than this list. If you want to know more about the hottest new games besides, look no further than page one, where we list the best new releases to keep an eye on.

Time to update your machine? If you don’t obsessively keep up with the latest hardware trends because it’s been a while, or if you’re just starting out with PC gaming, we’ve got you covered. No matter what you’re looking for, we’ve got the best for every budget on our lists of high-end gaming PC builds, the best gaming laptops and the best gaming PCs out of the box.

Top PC games to play right now

Plenty of recent releases haven’t quite made our top 30 list – which starts on the next page – but are well worth having a look at. If you want to stay on top with new releases or our top 30 PC games list isn’t quite for you, here are some recent top picks.

Kena: Bridge of Spirits 

Kena: Bridge of Spirits

(Image credit: Ember Labs)

Kena is an action-adventure with some light platforming elements, reminiscent of Playstation games from the early 2000s – tranquil, friendly, and not too challenging. You take control of the titular heroine Kena, a spirit guide trying to guide a few lost souls to their final resting place and to cleanse a forest of the rot they leave behind.

The most charming tool in her arsenal is the Rot, little creatures black as coal that can perform certain actions for her and aid her in combat. Produced by a small, independent team, Kena is quite an achievement – visually stunning and infused with a feeling of kindness. If you want to know more, read our Kena: Bridge of Spirits review.

Get it now:
Epic Games Store

Sable 

Sable

(Image credit: Shedworks)

Another beautiful and kind indie game releasing this month is Sable, an adventure about self-discovery and the thrill of the unknown. On the day Sable is old enough to leave her village, she builds a hoverbike and sets off into the desert in order to find a calling for herself. While Sable’s striking art style is likely the first thing you’ll notice about it, yet Sable is much more than that – as our Sable review puts it, simply existing in Sable’s world is a joy.

You have all the freedom to explore or just zoom around on your bike as you please.  Rarely has there been a game that is so much fun just to take in. But the writing is also excellent, imbuing our heroine with real character and building a rich world.

Get it now:
Steam
Epic Games Store
GOG
Also available on Xbox Game Pass

NEO: The World Ends With You

Neo: The World Ends With You

(Image credit: Square Enix)

More and more JRPGs make their way to PC, and now a The World Ends With You game is among them. NEO: The World Ends With You is the sequel to The World Ends With You, a game that’s still exclusive to Nintendo consoles, but if you’ve always been interested in this particular franchise you’ll be happy to hear NEO catches newbies up. Once again, you’re a contestant in the infamous Reapers’ Game, a game where several contestants fulfill tasks and fight monsters in Shibuya, Tokyo. Losing means death, so Rindo has to give his all.

Thankfully, it’s not all bleak, because NEO: The World Ends With You is filled with lovable (and seriously stylish) characters, funky music, and many references to Japanese pop culture. If you miss the charm of the real Shibuya, NEO: The World Ends With You is currently the next best thing.

Get it now:
Epic Games Store

Lemnis Gate

Lemnis Gate

(Image credit: Frontier)

This multiplayer FPS is not like the others – Lemnis Gate is more 4D chess than shooter. Each round is a 25 second time loop, so you have to plan the actions of your entire team. Since, just like in chess, you can only move so far and need to think one step ahead, this shooter isn’t a wild flurry of action, and it doesn’t make you part of a team.

Instead, you use the time loop and each operative’s unique skills to your advantage in maps and classic FPS game modes that have been adapted to fit Lemnis Gate’s concept. This is a fun experimental shooter, truly unique and a good choice for all those for whom team-based shooters have always been a bit too much.

Get it now:
Steam

Lost in Random

Lost in Random

(Image credit: EA)

This action-adventure is visually strongly reminiscent of Tim Burton films and other spooky stop-motion adventures such as Coraline, and it’s just as creative. The world of Random is governed by – you guessed it – randomness. Everyone in it lives at the mercy of an evil queen’s dice rolls.

You visit many creative, detailed lands with many characters to meet, all charmingly written and acted. Combat meanwhile is just as random as the world and its inhabitants, a mix of real-time action and card-based gameplay. Like Kena or even Psychonauts 2, Lost in random offers a charming world and is ultimately a fun, kind game to enjoy that’s worth getting attention.

Get it now:
Steam

Timberborn (Early Access)

Pathfinders: Wrath of the Righteous

(Image credit: Owlcat Games)

Play the beaver of the future. You heard that right, Timberborn revives the city building sim, with beavers. Calling itself ‘lumberpunk’, this game imagines a time where beavers take over after humans have run Earth into the ground and gone extinct. It’s on you to build a thriving colony and restore nature.

Timberborn is nice, not just because it doesn’t focus on humans and their motorways, but also because it’s entirely wood-based without losing any of the buildings you like in a citybuilder. You still have to build the city as well as its production lines, with water being a key resource, and you have to keep your population happy.

There is already lots to build and a delicate balance to keep in mind when designing your timber-based metropolis, and happily recommend building sim fans to try the Early Access version.

Get it now:
Steam
Epic Games Store

A Juggler’s Tale

A Juggler's Tale

(Image credit: Mixtvision Games)

This beautiful side-scrolling adventure actually started its life as a university project that then got published. Like Lost in Random, A Juggler’s Tale is actually a game that, while mostly very beautiful and tranquil, also hides a certain unease – it is essentially a surprisingly nuanced story about control, told in the guise of a game with light puzzles and platforming that don’t take away from the narrative focus.

Essentially a story within a story, A Juggler’s Tale follows Abby, a puppet that runs away from her life as an attraction and tries to regain freedom. The twist? That story of freedom is acted out by Jack, the storyteller, who is controlling Abby – but you, the player, aren’t Jack. Apart from its beautiful visuals and quite relaxing gameplay, A Juggler’s Tale thus offers a thoughtful meditation on what freedom is, offering a creative take on an age-old question.

Get it now:
Steam
Epic Games Store
GOG

Turn to page two for our full rundown of the 30 best PC games you need to add to your wishlist immediately... 

Malindy Hetfeld

Malindy is a freelance video games writer for outlets like Eurogamer, PLAY, PCGamer and Edge Magazine, who also occasionally works in game design consultation and localization. As a Japanese speaker, she enjoys Japanese pop culture and is always on the hunt for the next game from the Land of the Rising Sun. She also particularly enjoys narrative-focused games and cute indies, and always seeks to learn more about the business-side of the gaming industry.