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“Wow… you got a mouth on you.” Drug dealer Tuco’s assessment of Jimmy McGill is not only astute but perfectly encapsulates the appeal of this brilliantly scripted episode, and the potential of Better Call Saul as a whole.

Co-showrunner Peter Gould puts it even better, describing McGill as “a character whose secret weapon is his mouth”. The lengthy dialogue between McGill and Tuco as he bargains for the life of the two slackers he roped into his misguided scheme is captivating, a sustained, supple dance of dialogue that’s as gripping as any car chase or shoot out – if not more so. It’s the sort of sequence you want to rewind the moment it’s finished.

And it demonstrates rather neatly that it doesn’t really matter that we’ve seen Jimmy’s future. That’s the inherent problem with a prequel series, of course; we know Jimmy’s not going to die. (Mind you, let’s be honest… we knew Walter White wasn’t going to die too. Not until the end). But when it comes to anyone else, whether it’s the hapless skateboarders, Jimmy’s brother, or the mysterious Kim, anything is possible.

Featured Music

The music that plays over the scene where Jimmy meets a woman in a bar is “Boulevard Of Broken Dreams”, a 1958 track by Mexican band leader Esquivel.

It’s surprisingly heroic – if that’s the right word. Jimmy could walk away. By pausing to argue the toss, he risks bringing down Tuco’s wrath. Luckily for Jimmy, Tuco is, at this stage, not quite the hair-trigger psychopath he will one day become.

Judging by the beautifully put-together montage that follows, the encounter seems to energise Jimmy. It’s a pleasure to see him being good at his job, giving dim-witted juvenile perps a last chance at a life without a serious criminal record. It’s almost a shame it can’t last. As one suspected the moment Tuco hoved into view, Jimmy’s days as a cynical but essentially straight, law-abiding lawyer are coming to an end. With the offer of a partnership from Tuco’s lieutenant Nacho, the journey down the path to becoming Saul Goodman – a criminal lawyer, not a criminal lawyer – has begun...

WriterPeter Gould
DirectorMichelle MacLaren
The one whereJimmy McGill has to talk for his life - and, after impressing with his gift of the gab, is offered a route into criminality.

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Ian Berriman

Ian Berriman has been working for SFX – the world's leading sci-fi, fantasy and horror magazine – since March 2002. He also writes for Total Film, Electronic Sound and Retro Pop; other publications he's contributed to include Horrorville, When Saturday Comes and What DVD. A life-long Doctor Who fan, he's also a supporter of Hull City, and live-tweets along to BBC Four's Top Of The Pops repeats from his @TOTPFacts account.

If that's a bit too long, here's a more concise version.


Ian Berriman has been working for SFX since March 2002. He also writes for Total Film, Electronic Sound and Retro Pop. A life-long Doctor Who fan, he's also a supporter of Hull City, and live-tweets along to BBC Four's Top Of The Pops repeats from his @TOTPFacts account.