The best gaming mouse in 2024

If you're investing in your speed on the battlefield and comfort on the desk top, you'll want to be running one of the best gaming mouse models on the market. Thankfully, there are a whole bunch of companies out there competing for a spot in your setup, and depending on what, how, and when you play, the perfect pointer is out there somewhere. 

Finding the right rodent for you depends on a number of factors; the shape that feels most comfortable, your grip type, and the games that you play. That's why we're always putting new designs and sensors through their paces in all realms of PC gaming, from twitchy first-person shooters to slower strategy and simulation titles. Not only that, but we've stretched each device through long play sessions to make sure that comfort and performance lasts as well.

The best gaming mice combine comfort with customization, speed, and accuracy - and do it all while still offering solid value for money on top. Whether you're after an fps-first speedster or something a little chunkier under the fingertips, there are plenty of brands vying for a shot at the top spot these days. We've had our hands on a massive range of rodents over the years, and we're bringing you all our favorites right here. 

The quick list

The best gaming mouse overall

The best gaming mouse overall

Specifications

Connection: Wireless
Shape: Right-handed
Buttons: 6
DPI: 30,000
IPS: Up to 750
Switches: Optical Mouse Switches Gen-3
Weight: 2.04oz (58g)

Reasons to buy

+
Incredibly lightweight
+
Long battery life
+
Comfortable shape
+
Super-responsive sensor

Reasons to avoid

-
DPI shifter still placed under the body
-
Too expensive for wider genre players

The Razer Viper V2 Pro is a little older now, and has even seen the release of the new V3 Pro (featured below). However, its relatively low price point (now that sales have kicked in) and all-round means it's still the best gaming mouse on the market right now. The V3 model is laser-focused on its competitive edge, whereas the V2 Pro is more generalist in its approach.

Buy it if:

✅ You prioritize speed and precision: The Viper V2 Pro packs an insane amount of tech to keep you speedy in play, which does come at the cost of extra buttons or RGB features. Still, this is a performance-oriented device for the competitive player.
✅ You want a lightweight pointer:
At just 58g this is one of the lightest gaming mice on the market. If you don't want a cumbersome device holding you back on the battlefield, it doesn't get more nimble than this.
✅ You stick to faster paced games:
The Viper V2 Pro works at its best when its zipping across a battlefield, so if your library is packed with shooters and action titles you're going to get a good mileage out of these features.

Don't buy it if:

You want as many controls as possible: There are chunkier gaming mice out there with far more controls - if you're looking for a macro-heavy experience, the Viper V2 Pro isn't the best option.
You mostly play slower games: The speed and precision of the V2 Pro isn't going to be utilized enough in slower paced games. You can make your cash work harder for you with extra features if you have a slower library.
You want to shift DPI on the fly: Like many Razer mice, the DPI shift button is placed on the bottom of the device here, which means you won't be able to toggle between different speeds quickly. 

Design: While the overall design language of the Ultimate remains here, there are a few smaller details that have changed to dramatically reduce the weight from 74g to just 58g. We noted lack of side grips in our testing (though stickers are provided, just in the wrong color if you happen to grab the white model), as well as the slightly shorter dome along the top. Still, this pointer slotted straight back into our hands, and we were flying across the Apex Legends battlefield in no time. Super smooth PFTE feet combined with that featherweight form factor also make this a particularly easy glide.

Features: As mentioned above, this is a sparse pointer. Like the vast majority of FPS-focused devices you're getting the stock two side button design here, but that's still a good amount of controls for everyday play. However, everything that Razer has left inside the Viper V2 Pro works all the better for ditching extra frills. On top of an excellent battery life, everything under the hood has been tuned for extreme performance. That means Razer's Smart Tracking, Motion Sync, and Asymmetric Cut-Off technologies are whirring away to keep you precise and nimble with greater precision during lift-off and customizable tracking distances. 

Performance: Flicks and twitch reflexes were expertly picked up by the 30K Focus+ sensor, and the attention to tracking across various lift-off heights was also particularly welcomed during more frantic moments. With so much dedicated to keeping you nimble on the battlefield, though, the Razer Viper V2 Pro may struggle to prove its lofty price tag across other genres. All that tech felt a little redundant when we tested on slow games like Planet Coaster, and even in single player action titles like Rise of the Tomb Raider. 

Verdict: We'd heartily recommend anyone looking for an FPS-first pointer start their search here, but our fellow multi-genre enthusiasts will still find excellent value in this wireless gaming mouse

Read more: Razer Viper V2 Pro review

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The best value gaming mouse

The best value gaming mouse

Specifications

Connection: Wired
Shape: Right-handed
Buttons: 10 +1
DPI: 26,000
IPS: Up to 650
Switches: Razer 2nd Gen Optical Mechanical
Weight: 3.67oz (104g)

Reasons to buy

+
Thoughtful additional features
+
Super fast 26K DPI sensor
+
Comfortable ergonomic design
+
Cheaper than the V2

Reasons to avoid

-
Not light enough for competitive players

Unless you're playing competitively, it's difficult to beat the Razer Basilisk V3 in terms of sheer power and value. It also helps that the V3 comes in $10 cheaper than the previous iteration. 

Buy it if:

✅ You play a wide range of genres: The Basilisk's form factor and button design means it can suit everything from a slower paced sim title to faster action pursuits. That's perfect for the Steam generalist.
✅ You don't need a wireless connection:
There is a version of the Basilisk V3 that offers a wireless connection, but sticking to the cord keeps that price particularly competitive considering the rest of the features on offer.
✅ You value a larger design:
This isn't a slimline FPS-first gaming mouse, so if you prefer the comfort afforded by a wider body and additional ergonomic thumb tray you'll be well served.

Don't buy it if:

You want competitive speeds: The 26K DPI sensor isn't quite as snappy as more recent 30K models, so if you're after that lightning speed you'll want to move further up the price scale.
You need a lightweight device: Similarly, anyone looking to fling a rodent across their desk should be looking at a more slimline design like the Viper V2 Pro. This is a chunkier device made more for comfort.
A wireless connection is a priority: If you can't get by without a wireless connection we'd recommend checking out the more expensive Basilisk V3 Pro model. You're getting a similar feature set with 2.4GHz connectivity.

Design: The wired Basilisk carries a standard stacked gaming mouse design, with a thumb tray on the left flank for extra support and plenty of grips on each side. While a little heavier than the slimline FPS mice that feature elsewhere on this list, the V3 still feels incredible in the hand and glides through larger sweeps thanks to the improved PFTE feet underneath. A longer asymmetric form factor keeps everything ergonomic and controls close by, while the underglow RGB effect ensures the whole device looks as good as it feels.

Features: That 26K DPI sensor is definitely a nice to have (though in our testing we rarely needed to dial up to that kind of level), but the main draws here are the wide range of programmable buttons, unique RGB underglow, and tactile ergonomic design.

At its core, though, the latest Razer Basilisk is the same versatile pointer that we've always come to love from one of the best Razer mouse lines. With upgraded second generation switches in each main button, an additional trigger button on the left hand side, and a brand new smart scroll wheel, though, there are plenty of new features to celebrate here. 

Performance: We found those new switches to be a little lighter to the touch than previous iterations, but were impressed that they still managed to keep a satisfying response and snapped back quickly. This is a mouse designed for a range of pursuits, with plenty of controls for everything from Red Dead Redemption 2 to Cities Skylines. 

While it's not the fastest or the lightest mouse on the market, its solid performance across a massive range of genres certainly works better in the Basilisk V3's favor.

Verdict: This is an easy recommendation for anyone looking to stretch their pointer across multiple genres and, in our opinion, the best gaming mouse for most people right now.

Read more: Razer Basilisk V3 review

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The best budget gaming mouse

The best budget gaming mouse

Specifications

Connection: Wired
Shape: Right-handed
Buttons: 6
DPI: 8,000
IPS: Up to 200
Switches: Mechanical
Weight: 3oz (85g)

Reasons to buy

+
Solid feature set for the price
+
Comfortable shape and design
+
Excellent price to performance balance

Reasons to avoid

-
Smaller shape might not fit larger hands

Want to avoid breaking the bank? We'd recommend the Logitech G203 Lightsync. As well as being aggressively affordable, it's the best gaming mouse for those on a budget - balancing a decent feature-set with that low cost. 

Buy it if:

✅ You have a smaller budget: We often see the G203 available for particularly low prices year-round, which means anyone shopping with a particularly small budget will do well to start off here.
✅ You don't need a super fast sensor:
That cheaper price point means you're capped at an 8K sensor where more premium pointers hit up to 30K. Still, most players don't tend to move too far beyond 3,000 DPI.
✅ You still want macro controls:
You'll still find two dedicated side buttons for additional controls on here - excellent for that extra macro support.

Don't buy it if:

You have larger hands: The smaller form factor won't suit anyone with larger hands, as the shorter body will limit you to an uncomfortable version of a fingertip grip.
You need extra speed and precision: If you do need premium speeds you'll need to be paying for them. This isn't a particularly high-end sensor, so competitive players should steer clear.
You can spend more than $30: There are more features available further up the price scale. The Razer Basilisk V3, for example, offers plenty more buttons and an improved sensor for as little as $50 during sale events.
 

Design: We did find that chassis to be a little too small for larger hands in our own testing, though thanks to the 85g weight we were able to get along with both a claw and fingertip grip through multiple rounds of Apex Legends. 

It still looks great too; the design gives off a sense of quality you don't always get with mice at this price range. Between a range of different colorways and that crisp RGB light strip running around the edge of the body, you're getting more than we typically see at this price. Appearances aren't everything, but the G203 Lightsync aces that department nonetheless.

Features: Beneath the shell, you're treated to a satisfying but quick click thanks to responsive switches to go with six programmable buttons. These are supported by an optical sensor that provides a DPI ranging from 200 to 8,000. Although this isn't as high-performance as other entries on the list, it's more than enough for most people. Plus, it'll still be a huge step up compared to 'normal' non-gaming mice. Plus you're still able to assign macro commands to the six programmable buttons (including two dedicated side clickers) across the whole mouse as well. 

Performance: Of course, the G203 isn't going to give Razer or Corsair's top pointers any problems on the battlefield. However, the casual everyday player has all the speed and accuracy they need to reliably play through a range of genres. Logitech's device holds its position well, offers up snappy in-game responses, and remains comfortable while doing so. Yes, overall speed wasn't the same as it would be with the Razer Viper at the helm, but for $30 it didn't need to be. 

Verdict: The G203's competition generally only comes from the Razer Viper Mini and the Razer DeathAdder V2 Mini. The Logitech G203 Lightsync, however, is cheaper than the DeathAdder V2 Mini and offers a larger body than the Viper Mini, which will satisfy a wider range of grip types.

Read more: Logitech G203 Lightsync review

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The best ambidextrous gaming mouse

The best ambidextrous gaming mouse

Specifications

Connection: 2.4GHz / Bluetooth / Wired
Shape: Ambidextrous
Buttons: 7
Battery life: Up to 210 hours (Bluetooth, RGB off)
DPI: 26,000
IPS: Up to 650
Sensor: Corsair Marksman
Switches: Corsair Quickstrike
Weight: 3.13oz (89g)

Reasons to buy

+
Comfortable shape
+
Clean design
+
Swappable side buttons
+
Super fast sensor
+
Unique DPI shifting functions
+
Excellent battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
Shorter side buttons

The Corsair M75 Wireless has taken over from the Logitech G Pro as the best ambidextrous gaming mouse on the market this year - and for good reason. While it's a little pricier (you'll find the older G Pro on sale for less and less these days), it bumps you up to new gen specs with a boosted sensor, higher IPS tracking, and some nifty extra DPI features. 

Buy it if:

✅ You need a left-handed gaming mouse: Of course, if you're after a left handed gaming mouse this is going to be a no brainer. The swappable buttons on each side mean you're covered whichever hand you play with.
✅ You prioritize a wireless connection:
The wireless connection in here is a nice to have as well - if you're going for a cordless setup that's a massive benefit.
✅ You don't want to worry about battery life:
Not only is there a wireless connection, but it's got the battery to support it. We were impressed with this juice even while running RGB.

Don't buy it if:

You need a lot of programmable buttons: This is a larger device, but it doesn't have the array of extra buttons we normally see on devices like it. If you need more than the standard two side buttons, it's worth looking elsewhere. 

You don't need a wireless connection: The M75 Wireless launched with the wired version in tow, so if you don't need a cord-free connection there's a cheaper alternative out there. 

Design: The higher dome and steep gradient down towards the main clicks means this isn't one for fingertip holders, but is particularly comfortable for both left and right handed palm and claw grippers. That's complimented by a larger form factor that steers clear of traditionally skinny FPS-first mice as well. We found everything to be particularly well balanced, with the gentler slope towards the base of the palm centering the M75 Wireless well and providing fantastic precision. 

Throw in a crisp white colorway (though the gray scroll wheel does look a little cheap for the price) and two RGB strips down the back of the device and you've got a neat looking pointer on the desk. It's a little heavier than some other options, especially considering this is a strictly two-side-button affair, but it never dragged in our testing. 

Features: Those on the hunt for an ambidextrous gaming mouse will be pleased to know that the Corsair M75 Wireless offers two sets of swappable side buttons on each flank. We did find the included clickers a little short, and therefore harder to find and press during the first few days of testing, but it was nothing muscle memory couldn't learn. The ambidextrous form factor does mean that you're limited to these side buttons despite there being space for a DPI slowing sniper button, for example. However, that would have to be relegated to one side or the other. 

Underneath the device you'll find a secret weapon. The DPI shifter is placed at the bottom, annoyingly, but Corsair makes up for it by adding additional functionality. Holding the shifter button and one of the side clickers will give you a fine level of control over your sensitivity on the fly. It's the first time we've seen something like this and it came in particularly handy. 

Not to mention this is a fully wireless device with a solid 210 hours of Bluetooth battery with RGB switched off, bumping down to 105 hours when used over Corsair's 2.4GHz Slipstream dongle. 

Performance: The snappy Corsair Quickstrike switches combined with a 26K Marksman sensor work to create a particularly slick feel on the battlefield. The M75 Wireless is capable of faster speeds than the Logitech G Pro Wireless, and despite the additional weight keeping it from true FPS arenas there's a nice glide to keep everything running smoothly. 

Verdict: The Corsair M75 Wireless isn't going to give the Viper V2 Pro any problems when it comes to faster games, due to its bulkier form factor, but it's certainly a must-see for anyone after an ambidextrous pointer. The higher dome means it's a comfortable device for both left and right hands and there's plenty of speed and power under the hood to boot.

Read more: Corsair M75 Wireless review

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The most versatile gaming mouse

The most versatile gaming mouse

Specifications

Connection: 2.4GHz, Bluetooth, wired
Shape: Right-handed
Buttons: 10, 14 or 20 programmable buttons
DPI: 30,000
IPS: 750
Switches: Razer Optical
Weight: 4.72oz / 134g

Reasons to buy

+
Comfortable form factor
+
Excellent customization options
+
Smart scroll wheel adds extra personalization
+
Wireless charging support

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavier weight can make fps feel cumbersome
-
High price point for niche use-case

The Razer Naga V2 Pro picks up where the original Pro model left off. Three swappable side plates offering button configurations suited to a massive range of genres, making for an incredibly versatile device. At $179.99 / £179.99, though, this isn't going to be one for those to dip in and out of everyday play.

Buy it if:

✅ You play a range of different genres: The Naga V2 Pro demands that you throw everything at it. That lofty price point is going to make the most sense for players who can truly put those swappable panels to their best use.
✅ You can afford to spend on luxury kit:
This isn't a cheap pointer, and its higher MSRP is going to cut a considerable amount of players out of its market.
✅ You don't mind a heavier form factor:
The chunkier body and heavier form factor are still comfortable and even flingable at times, but this isn't a super lightweight device.

Don't buy it if:

You play a lot of faster paced games: The shape and weight of the Naga V2 Pro isn't conducive to faster playstyles, so if you're after a new gaming mouse for first person shooters or more frantic action titles we'd recommend something slimmer.
You don't play MMOs: If MMOs don't feature in your Steam library, the amount of buttons on offer here isn't going to make much sense considering the price you're paying.
You prefer a lighter weight: This is a heavier mouse, which can feel cumbersome to some. If you prefer a lighter feel it's best to look elsewhere. 

Design: There are many things that separate the Razer Naga V2 Pro from the rest of the pack, but the most obvious is the design. Yes, the squat form factor takes some getting used to, but it proves comfortable after some muscle memory reworking. However, the heavier weight means faster paced first person shooter titles are a little difficult to work with. We found that the 134g footprint, and larger domed hump, kept the Naga V2 Pro from being truly nimble on the battlefield, but still provides a solid experience for everyday play. 

Features: Of course, the biggest feature here is those swappable side plates. Changing the left flank of your Naga V2 Pro gives you access to a more traditional two-button panel, or a six button array. You can, of course, also keep the massive 12 button console for full macro control as well. 

Razer has also added a Hyperscroll Pro wheel to its pointer. Not only does that grant you access to an additional three programmable buttons (for a total of up to 20), but the wheel can switch between six different scrolling modes. Tension and scroll speed can be customized to change the feel and control level of the wheel altogether, stepping between tighter notches and free spinning movement. While that's not a make or break feature, it's a nice to have that kicks in during productivity uses as well. 

Performance: Packing a 30K sensor, which offered super responsive tracking and particularly nippy response times in our testing, and a customizable scroll wheel, there are plenty of enhancements here over the original model. The Naga performs incredibly well across a range of genres, though it does feel a little sluggish for true FPS-first style gameplay. Snappy clicks and low latencies still kept everything floating, though, which is impressive considering the bulk of the body it's working through. Wireless performance is excellent and battery life will see you through plenty of sessions without RGB switched on.

Verdict: The Naga V2 Pro is a pricey one, but if you're as invested in MMOs as you are other genres, it's a worthwhile pickup. Yes, the Corsair Darkstar below is going to better serve MMO fans in general, but if you hop between a range of different genres regularly there isn't a rodent out there better suited.

Read more: Razer Naga V2 Pro review

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The best gaming mouse for FPS

The best gaming mouse for FPS

Specifications

Connection: 2.4GHz / Wired
Shape: Right-handed
Buttons: 6
DPI: 35,000
IPS: 750
Switches: Razer Gen 3 Optical
Weight: 54g

Reasons to buy

+
Super-fast performance
+
Incredibly lightweight
+
Comfortable, curved design
+
8K HyperPolling dongle included
+
Boosted sensor

Reasons to avoid

-
No accessible DPI shifter
-
HyperPolling dongle makes it harder to transport
-
Larger shape won't be for everyone

The Razer Viper V3 Pro is the latest Razer pointer to hit the market, and it's going all-in on competitive FPS. This is a speedster, with a super flyweight form factor, 8K HyperPolling straight out the box, and DPI reaching up to eye-watering 35K heights. It doesn't quite knock the V2 Pro off the top spot, but it's certainly the best option for FPS gamers right now. 

Buy it if:

Speed is your number one priority: Movements don't get much faster than this. The Viper V3 Pro combines an easily flickable low-weight design with a super powerful sensor and 8K polling rates. 

You still want a chunkier grip: For those with medium or large hands, the Viper V3 Pro offers more body space to work with in its taller form factor. 

A wireless connection is a priority: It's a little easier to find lightweight gaming mice with a wired connection, but if you're after a cordless option this is a fantastic option.

Don't buy it if:

You want to travel as easily as possible: The Viper V3 Pro doesn't come with a neat little USB 2.4GHz receiver, instead only shipping with the HyperPolling dongle. That's super speedy, but does mean you'll be taking a full cable around with you. 

You prefer a flatter shape: The higher dome of the V3 Pro model isn't for everyone - if you prefer a lower profile the V2 Pro is a better fit. 

Design: The Viper V3 Pro isn't too dissimilar in design from the cheaper Viper V3 Hyperspeed model that launched last year. The form factor has changed between these generations. Gone is the flatter, slightly skinnier design that made the V2 Pro easily flickable and lightweight. Instead, we've got a chunkier body with a soft-touch plastic coating similar to that of the Logitech G Pro X Superlight 2

During testing, we personally preferred the textured surface and slightly smaller frame of the V2 model, but if you have larger hands or you're tired of using a dinkier device the V3 Pro might be the better option. That 54g weight is particularly impressive for a wireless device, though. It's lighter than both the GLorious Model O 2 and Logitech's Superlight 2. 

Features: The HyperPolling dongle allows you to hit polling speeds of up to 8K - a feature rapidly descending on pretty much all high-end FPS gaming mice. Whether your system will actually be able to make much use of that depends on individual circumstances. A wired connection drops this rate down to a maximum of 1,000Hz which is a little disappointing. Still, casual players aren't going to notice a difference - that 8K figure really is for the ultra-competitive. 

As you might expect, the Viper V3 Pro comes with Razer's latest and greatest tech; a Focus Pro 35K optical sensor. This is a nice bump, but again it's only going to be appreciated by those at the top of their game. Not too many players venture much further than 5K DPI, and the extra sensitivity matching options feel like an unnecessary gimmick. 

Performance: Of course an ultra-competitive FPS gaming mouse is going to be fast. The Razer Viper V3 Pro is a blinder on the battlefield, with its low weight and high-performing sensor making a tangible difference in accuracy and response times. That's not something we can say of the vast majority of gaming mice on the market. 

Verdict: If you're looking for a super speedy FPS mouse that allows for a range of different grip styles and caters to ultra-competitive players in its feature set, this is a fantastic option. 

Read more: Razer Viper V3 Pro review

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The best gaming mouse for MMOs

The best gaming mouse for MMOs and MOBAs

Specifications

Connection: 2.4GHz / Bluetooth / wired
Shape: Right-handed
Buttons: 15
DPI: 26,000
IPS: Up to 650
Switches: Omron
Weight: 96g

Reasons to buy

+
Clean, subtle aesthetic
+
Comfortable form factor
+
Plenty of control from grippy side panel
+
15 programmable inputs
+
Intuitive and reliable tilt controls

Reasons to avoid

-
Rear side buttons are harder to hit
-
Takes some getting used to
-
iCue isn't the easiest software on the market
-
Lower battery life

The Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite used to be our top pick for the best MMO gaming mouse, but the new Darkstar Wireless has just taken the crown. It's a little different (and you are dropping two programmable buttons), but for the vast majority of players its improvements in comfort and accuracy and its new tilt features are going to prove far more useful.

Buy it if:

✅ You play MMOs regularly: MMO players are obviously going to get the most mileage out of this button array, so if you're after a purpose built device, this is an excellent option.
✅ You're not tied to the traditional 12 button style:
That said, it's going to take some muscle memory reworking to get used to the circular design, which is going to be easier for those who aren't already tied to the 12 button style.
✅ You want more control:
The grippy texture in the centre of the buttons makes for far greater control without any accidental presses - that's handy if you've had to stop using your thumb to move in certain directions due to the more traditional button placement.

Don't buy it if:

You're concerned about button placement: If you don't want to have to learn a new style of button placement, particularly around the rear clickers, it's worth sticking to a 12 button array.
You don't want to worry about charging: The battery life here isn't quite as solid as other mice in this price region. If you don't want to think about charging too often there are longer lasting devices out there. 

Design: The additional control offered by a grippy panel in the center makes for a particularly accurate gaming mouse experience. Everything feels nimble and controlled here, without any concerns over accidental button presses. These buttons do take some time to learn, and we found the rear clickers to be a little difficult to reach in the heat of the moment. In general, though - it works. Add an effortlessly comfortable dome and soft-touch plastic throughout and you've got an MMO mouse that can comfortably see you through longer sessions without cramping. 

Features: The 12 button panel on the side of the Scimitar has been replaced with a six-button array positioned around a grippy thumb texture. In our testing, that was more than enough inputs for go-to commands and inventory management (alongside the impressively functional tilt controls). What you're dropping in quantity you're making up for in quality though.

Performance: The Darkstar beats the older Scimitar in everything from DPI to IPS to weight, and throws in wireless connectivity across both Bluetooth and 2.4GHz as well. The best part is its flexibility though. The Scimitar was a made-for-MMO mouse, which left us feeling a little OTT when playing in other genres. However, hopping between Elder Scrolls Online and more story-led experiences like Alan Wake was easy thanks to this more refined design and boosted 26K DPI sensor. 

Verdict: This is an MMO mouse made to hit every box in its own way. While it will take some muscle memory training to get it working to its best, putting that work in is well worth it not just for fans of the genre, but for multi-game generalists as well. 

Read more: Corsair Darkstar Wireless review

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The best gaming mouse for RGB

The best gaming mouse for RGB fans

Specifications

Connection: Wired
Shape: Right-handed
Buttons: 15
DPI: 19,000
Switches: Roccat Titan Switch Optical
Weight: 3.6oz (104g)

Reasons to buy

+
Incredibly comfortable design
+
Plentiful, well-placed macro buttons
+
Speedy sensor

Reasons to avoid

-
Less texture on rubber grips
-
No color controls on Swarm software

The RGB available on the Roccat Kone XP certainly won't be for everyone, but if you're looking to maximise your LED to price ratio, you'll need to check out this 90s-inspired pointer.

Buy it if:

✅ You're an RGB fan: Obviously this is one for the more LED-minded among us, but if you're looking for a gaming mouse that can keep up with the RGB of your setup this is an excellent choice.
✅ You prefer a larger form factor:
This isn't a skinny mouse so you're getting plenty of space to work with and a comfortable shell overall.
✅ You want more controls than standard:
You're still getting a solid array of buttons on the left flank here, more than we typically see at this kind of price point.

Don't buy it if:

You don't like RGB: Of course, anyone who prefers a more subtle aesthetic isn't going to have a good time here. Even switching those RGBs off leaves you with a gaudy translucent shell to contend with.
You prioritize speed: This isn't a gaming mouse built for speed - rather a jack of all trades type design. If you're looking for lightning fast tracking we'd recommend a lighter model.
You want more control over aesthetics: Those RGB lights can't be customized which might put many off - especially if you're building a setup with a more streamlined aesthetic.

Design: We were initially sceptical of this blinding design, but once our eyes adjusted we found that the unique aesthetic (combined with the smoky effect of the translucent plastic) was surprisingly pleasing. The form factor itself retains the steady shape of the Roccat Kone Air Pro before it, providing a particularly comfortable dome up top and a thumb rest to the left. We did also notice that the slanted shape made the Kone XP feel a lot like the Basilisk V3 Pro underhand, though the grippy sides are less textured here.

Features: We were particularly impressed by the placement and usability of the additional side buttons here. Each of the four main macro buttons (and the additional thumb button) running along the left hand side were easy to hit and, crucially, easy to hit accurately. Unlike the Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite and the Razer Naga Pro above, you're not getting a full keypad of additional functions. However, with an extra layer of functionality accessible via Roccat's EasyShift button, there's a whole world of customization open to you. 

We're recommending the Kone XP as the best gaming mouse for RGB lovers, but it's important to note that this is from a brute force angle, rather than in terms of customization. It still feels like the Swarm software is catching up, which means we were a little disappointed to realise that you can't actually change the colors of these RGB strips. However, there are plenty of cycles to choose from, and the overall effect may be too good to turn down.

Performance: Of course, those LEDs don't distract from the excellent performance under the hood. This rodent is weighty enough to feel solid on the desk, while still keeping things light enough to glide easily across the surface. With Nvidia's Reflex Analyzer tool for certain games, response times and aim support are optimized throughout the experience if you're running a higher end rig as well. Even straight out the box, though, this mouse has the precision and speed to keep up with the best models on the market. 

Verdict: The Roccat Kone XP isn't going to be to everyone's tastes, but if you're an RGB fan after a gaming mouse that can perform as well under the hood as it does in its LEDs you're in for a treat. There's plenty of extra features packed into this reasonable price tag, even if it's not the fastest or most versatile pointer available.

Read more: Roccat Kone XP review

Also Consider:

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How to find the best gaming mouse for you

It's easy to forget that the right gaming mouse for you might not be the latest or greatest release. In fact, it's worth getting to know what you need from a gaming mouse to make the right choice when it comes to checkout. 

There are a few specs and features that you should always be looking for when browsing the shelves - just to make sure you're keeping up with the times. However, knowing your preferred grip, the types of games you'll play, and the level of software control you're after will also help you narrow down your options significantly. 

Grip Type

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For all the jargon involved in buying a gaming mouse, it's easy to forget the biggest factor of all - comfort. You will naturally hold your mouse in a certain grip, usually either a palm, claw, or tip grip. The size and shape of your mouse will determine whether it is comfortable to hold in this way, so it's worth noting how you naturally place your hand on the pointer and double checking your chosen mouse will fit you. 

  • Palm: you hold the mouse with most of your hand and fingers resting on the mouse itself - aim for a wider mouse with a taller back arch.
  • Claw: only the bottom of your palm and the tips of your fingers are in contact with the mouse - aim for a shorter mouse with a small but still pronounced back arch.
  • Fingertip: there is very little contact between your hand and the mouse, with only your fingertips touching the buttons and sides - aim for a smaller body with as flat a back as you can find.

Wired vs Wireless

Wireless gaming mice are gathering steam these days, as models hit the market that can overcome the traditional latency that used to come with untethering. However, it's still worth noting that you'll be paying a lot more for a wireless mouse that functions like a wired one. 

These superfast connections still come at a premium, especially when placed on devices with high CPI rates and other fancier features. 

A 2.4GHz connection is a must if you're looking to spend a little more on a wireless device, though, as this is the only way you'll pick up competitive response times without a cable. 

Weight

Getting the right weight for your mouse will largely come down to the kinds of games you play. Lighter, more agile, mice are required for tournament level FPS play, but should also be considered for everyday action style titles as well. A heavier mouse is more likely to offer more configurable buttons, however, which means MOBA and MMO players may choose to forego that sub-100g profile for easy access to all their gear in-game. 

CPI / DPI

In everyday play, some tend to place too much emphasis on the CPI / DPI of the best gaming mice on the market. CPI (or sometimes referred to as DPI) tracks how often the mouse's sensor tracks the surface it's on. The higher this rate, the less you'll need to move your mouse to register movement on the screen. 

CPI has been exploding recently, with mice now starting to push past the 20K sensors that were so impressive just last year. It's worth noting, though, that these incredibly sensitive settings won't be used from day to day, so an 8K or 10K sensor on the right mouse can still give you the edge.

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Also Tested

Not every gaming mouse we test hits all the right boxes to sit at the top of our list, but if the above options don't satisfy there are plenty more out there. You'll find all of our recently reviewed gaming mice just below. 

Logitech G Pro X Superlight 2 | Available at Amazon

Logitech G Pro X Superlight 2 | Available at Amazon
We recently tested the Logitech G Pro X Superlight 2 and were impressed by its comfort considering the low weight design. While it's not quite as nippy enough to go up against the Viper V2 Pro in this FPS-first category it's an excellent option for those with larger hands. 

Logitech G Pro X Superlight 2 review

Razer Viper V3 Hyperspeed | Available at Amazon

Razer Viper V3 Hyperspeed | Available at Amazon
The Razer Viper V3 Hyperspeed steps away from the low profile, slimline design of yore. Instead, the cheaper device focuses on value for money in a wireless gaming mouse. However, there may be too many sacrifices in here for some players. 

Razer Viper V3 Hyperspeed review

Razer Cobra Pro | Available at Amazon

Razer Cobra Pro | Available at Amazon
The Razer Cobra Pro is a fantastic feeling gaming mouse looking to keep you company across everything from first person shooters to slower titles. That said, it's a jack of all trades and doesn't excel in any particular use-case over another - and its smaller form factor won't be for everyone.

Razer Cobra Pro review

Razer DeathAdder V3 | Available at Amazon

Razer DeathAdder V3 |