Skip to main content

Cobra Kai season 5 announced by Netflix – before season 4 has even arrived

Cobra Kai season 4
(Image credit: Netflix)

Cobra Kai season 4 may not have a release date yet (we only know that the series returns in December), but already Netflix has renewed the show for a fifth season.

The Karate Kid sequel has been a massive hit for the streamer so far, with Cobra Kai season 3 winning over viewers' hearts around the globe. Netflix must have high hopes for season 4, which will take our heroes to the All Valley Karate Tournament.

Netflix revealed the renewal on Twitter with the Cobra Kai account posting a video of the numeral "V" glowing in fire. "The dojo is about to be 5x as rad," reads the caption on the post. "Cobra Kai has been renewed for a 5th season."

See more

The show's creators previously hinted that the series would not be coming to an end anytime soon. "We have an endgame in our heads. We’ve had one for quite some time, and it’s not in season 4," executive producer Josh Heald told TVLine. "It’s well beyond that. In our minds, we have seasons’ worth of story that is necessary to tell before we get to that endgame. That will be a discussion going forward with our new partners at Netflix. Can we write to that endgame? Can we know that it’s coming?"

Cobra Kai season 4 is set to debut this December, with Ralph Macchio, William Zabka, and the rest of the main cast all expected to return. It has also been confirmed that Terry Silver actor Thomas Ian Griffith is back for the fourth season and, given how the third season ended, the villain – who first appeared in The Karate Kid Part 3 – is bound to have a major role to play. Now, there's the question of whether he could continue causing problems into season 5.

For something to watch now, check out our list of the best Netflix shows streaming right now.

Jack Shepherd

I'm the Entertainment Editor over here at GamesRadar+, bringing you all the latest movie and TV news, reviews, and features, plus I look after the Total Film and SFX sections and socials. I used to work at The Independent as a general culture writer before specializing in TV and film