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Marvel has a new animated show with Jason Sudeikis and Olivia Munn – here's the first Hit-Monkey trailer

From the Hit-Monkey show coming to Hulu
(Image credit: Marvel/Hulu)

Marvel has a new animated show on the way, and the first trailer is finally here.

Hit-Monkey sees a Japanese snow macaque go on a killing spree while exacting revenge for the death of his former mentor, Bryce, voiced by Ted Lasso actor and creator Jason Sudeikis. Despite being dead, Bryce has a big presence on the show, as he's become a ghostly A.I. who guides Hit-Monkey. 

The trailer is as batshit as all that sounds and teases appearances from Olivia Munn and George Takai on the show. Watch below.

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Hit-Monkey was commissioned by Marvel before the superhero studio began pushing new Disney Plus shows. Along with MODOK, the new series will be released on Hulu in the United States and does not have any connective tissue to the greater Marvel Cinematic Universe. In fact, Marvel's shows on Hulu were originally envisioned as being part of a separate shared universe, MODOK and Hit-Monkey meeting in an Avengers-like team-up named The Offenders, though plans were scuppered when MCU maestro Kevin Feige took charge of Marvel's TV output.

Jordan Blum, who co-created MODOK with Paton Oswalt, serves as co-creator of Hit-Monkey with Will Speck (Office Christmas Party, Switched). "[Hit-Monkey]'s a character who is violent and temper­amental but also deeply wounded and innocent," Blum told Entertainment Weekly while previewing the new show.

Meanwhile, Sudeikis has been winning Emmys for Ted Lasso, and Munn has been busy with roles in Netflix's America: The Motion Picture, and The Gateway. 

Prepare for the future of the MCU with our guide to Marvel Phase 4 and all the new Marvel TV shows coming your way.

Jack Shepherd

I'm the Entertainment Editor over here at GamesRadar+, bringing you all the latest movie and TV news, reviews, and features, plus I look after the Total Film and SFX sections and socials. I used to work at The Independent as a general culture writer before specializing in TV and film