More of the Cyberpunk 2077 soundtrack was released during today's Night City Wire

(Image credit: CD Projekt Red)

CD Projekt Red released another snippet of the Cyberpunk 2077 soundtrack during today's Night City Wire stream. 

The new song is A Like Supreme, the latest from the in-game band Samurai which is played by the real-life band Refused. I can only assume that A Like Supreme was written as a post-social media tribute to John Coltrane's A Love Supreme. You can now stream it on Spotify (opens in new tab) along with Chippin' In, Never Fade Away, and The Ballad of Buck Ravers, giving us a total of four songs from the band. 

Samurai, you may recall, is the band of Keanu Reeves' character Johnny Silverhand. Dennis Lyxzén, lead vocalist of Refused, discussed the challenge of adapting his band's style to suit Johnny's legacy.  "I wouldn't write these lyrics for myself," he says. "So it's kind of interesting to get into the mind of, like, who is this character and what would they write about? What's their agenda? It's interesting to try to catch a language that's his and part of this game … Of course, there are things you can relate to with this outcast that's fighting against the corpos. That's definitely something that's been a part of my life and a part of the Refused life." 

"They wanted a sound that's contemporary for when Johnny is supposed to have had the band," drummer David Sandström adds. "He's an anti-establishment kind of guy. We really worked on these songs to make them as good as possible, but then, they're not actually our songs. It's been a mind fuck." 

Sounds like the perfect music to listen to while you explore the destructive possibilities of the Cyberpunk 2077 weapons (opens in new tab). 

Austin freelanced for the likes of PC Gamer, Eurogamer, IGN, Sports Illustrated, and more while finishing his journalism degree, and he's been with GamesRadar+ since 2019. They've yet to realize that his position as a staff writer is just a cover up for his career-spanning Destiny column, and he's kept the ruse going with a focus on news and the occasional feature.