Washington DC rally calls for gamers

Couch potatoes need not apply

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Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses. Or at least just step away from StarCraft II long enough togatherat theSupreme Court to voice your opinion on videogames and protected speech. A game advocacy group is planning a rally outside the high court on November 2.

For those not aware, a potentially monumental case isgoing to the United States Supreme Court on November 2. At issue is a California bill recently signed into law that would place extra burden on retailers when it comes to games that have graphically violent content. The law would almost usurp the ESRB ratings and place the entire subject of what is and isn't acceptable into an arbitrary case-by-case basis.

The Entertainment Software Association together with sister organization the Entertainment Merchants Association will battle California governor Arnold Schwazenegger in court over whether or not the law is constitutional. The former will argue it violates first amendment rights. The latter will hopefully find some place to use the term "girly men."

A third-party gamer rights activist group, the Entertainment Consumers Association, wants gamers to gather at the steps of the Supreme Court right before the hearing is set to begin.

"This will be a historic day for gamers and the video game industry as a whole, and we greatly appreciate everyone who has taken action on this pivotal issue. Video games, like any other form of entertainment, should be protected under our First Amendment and now is the time to stand up and let our collective voices be heard," said ECA general counsel Jennifer Mercurio in a statement.

Similar state laws have been passed in other parts of the country and have a 100% record of being overturned at the Supreme Court. But then again, the powerful justices have never come face-to-face over the issuewith The Arnold.

[Source:Kotaku]

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