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Best monitor for PS5: upgrade your display with the best PS5 monitor you can get

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Best PS5 monitor
(Image credit: Future/ASUS)

The best monitor for PS5 is the perfect way to complement your new PS5 console - if you've been lucky enough to get one since it came out or if you can find PS5 stock. The PlayStation 5 is a huge technical leap over every Playstation that’s come before, so it deserves a cutting-edge monitor to match - one of the best gaming monitors for the console, specifically.

The downside of the PS5’s upgraded video output capabilities is that you’ll need to take a bit more care when browsing the best PS5 monitor. At least you will if you want to unlock all PS5’s visual capabilities: 4K, 120Hz refresh, variable refresh rate, and HDR - the PS5 does it all. Critical to all of the above is finding a monitor with the right video interface. An HDMI input is required, naturally, but not any old HDMI. Only the very latest HDMI 2.1 socket can fully unleash the PS5’s graphical goodies.

However, things are changing from both the monitor perspective and the console's perspective: the recent PS5 April update confirmed that, among other fixes and bits and bobs, there would now be 120 Hz support for "some" 1080p/120 Hz PC monitors. This is great news and would allow players to game at 120fps on these compatible monitors. So soon after said update, we are working our way towards a list and information on which exact PS5 monitors will be compatible to take advantage of this support so stay tuned and more of those monitors will appear in this list. And also, hopefully, this paves the way for such support on other monitors too.

Of course, price is going to be a major factor. Delivering all those core capabilities in one screen will be costly. For example, the best 4K monitor for gaming with both high refresh and true HDR capability are currently in the $1,000/£1,000 ballpark. Some fantastic screens can be had for half of that money - or even less. But with lower pricing comes compromises.

One of those areas of compromise - and something we know for sure - is that the PS5 is a little more specific about resolution than a PC, and this will affect your search for the best PS5 monitor - both now and in the future. At launch, the PS5 doesn’t support a 1440p resolution, though compatibility may be added in a future update. Likewise, ultra-wide aspect monitors are a poor fit with the PS5, too. So stick with either 1080p or 4K screens unless support for other resolutions is added. Lastly, it is absolutely worth noting that these are our early picks for the best monitor for PS5 you can get - expect this list to change and grow over the coming months as more models come out and break cover.

Remember, if you're after something different you can browse our guides to the best Xbox Series X monitors, best PS4 monitors, best G-Sync monitors, and best G-Sync compatible FreeSync monitors to complete your research.

ASUS VP28UQG

(Image credit: ASUS)

ASUS VP28UQG

The best PS5 monitor offering cheap 4K thrills

Specifications
Screen size:: 28-inch
Aspect ratio:: 16:9
Resolution:: 4K; 3840x2160
Brightness:: 300cd/m2
Response time:: 1ms
Viewing angle:: 170/160 degrees
Contrast ratio:: 500:1
Reasons to buy
+4K visuals+1ms response+Surprisingly cheap
Reasons to avoid
-TN panel tech-Just 60Hz refresh

The PS5 is capable of 4K and 120Hz. But the reality is that relatively few games will be capable of achieving both at the same time. That’s doubly true of the latest and most graphically intensive games. You’re not going to get close to 120Hz running at 4K. So, if you fancy 4K and can’t stretch to a high-refresh monitor, the ASUS VP28UQG could be just the thing.

Priced around $240 / £240, it’s remarkably affordable for a 4K 28-inch panel. And thanks to an HDMI 2.0 interface, it’s fully compatible with the PS5. ASUS has also included DisplayPort 1.2 connectivity, so this monitor will happily tag team with a PC, too. Along with no support for 120Hz refresh, HDR capability is also conspicuous by its absence. But, again, most so-called HDR monitors aren’t truly capable of HDR visuals.

Likewise, what does matter for many gamers is speed in terms of pixel response. Here the ASUS VP28UQG scores with its 1ms-capable TN panel. Grant, TN tech isn’t the best when it comes to colours, contrast, and viewing angles. But you’d be surprised just how close it now comes while maintaining an edge over IPS and VA technology for pure speed.

BenQ EW3270U

(Image credit: BenQ)

BenQ EW3270U

Premium 4K visuals at a pretty appealing price

Specifications
Screen size:: 31.5-inch
Aspect ratio:: 16:9
Resolution:: 4K; 3840x2160
Brightness:: 300cd/m2
Response time:: 4ms
Viewing angle:: 178/178 degrees
Contrast ratio:: 3,000:1
Reasons to buy
+Excellent 3,000:1 static contrast+Perfectly sized monitor for console
Reasons to avoid
-Slightly older model-No 120Hz

If you want premium 4K visuals at an affordable price, you could do a whole lot worse than the BenQ EW3270U. OK, it’s an older model and not a true HDR display even though it will process an HDR input. But thanks to its VA panel, it has fantastic 3,000:1 static contrast and seriously punchy colours. Of course, at this price point, you’re not going to get 120Hz support. Likewise, variable rate refresh is not on the menu. Oh, and VA panels are not the last word in pixel response, either.

If that makes the BenQ EW3270U sound like a bum choice, you do get all 3,840 by 2,160 pixels and really nice core image quality in a generous 32-inch package. At this price point, you’d normally expect to find 27-inch 4K monitors. Throw in a slim-bezel design that looks far more expensive than it is and it’s a very compelling overall package. OK, it’s a compromise, the EW3270U. It doesn’t unlock all the PS5’s capabilities, most notably that sweet, smooth 120Hz refresh. But something’s got to give at this end of the market and if 4K is a priority, the BenQ is well worth a look.

ASUS CG32UQ

(Image credit: ASUS)

ASUS CG32UQ

A quality console specific monitor great for PS5 - and PS4

Specifications
Screen size: 32-inch
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Resolution: 3840x2160
Brightness: 400cd/m2
Response time: 5ms
Viewing angle: 178/178 degrees
Contrast ratio: 3,000:1
Reasons to buy
+Great picture quality+Good color range, depth and contrasts+Full 4K and HDR goodness
Reasons to avoid
-A bit pricey-Still only 60Hz

It's refreshing to see monitors dedicated to, or at least aimed at, console gaming making solid appearances in best lists in recent years. And this is a seriously great console monitor that will be in with a shout for best PS5 monitor lists across the internet this and next year. The CG32UQ is a console-focused gaming monitor and has serious gaming pedigree and stock behind it coming from ASUS.

It is a little expensive but you get some serious monitor, tech, and performance for your money. Its main headline, if you will, is that it is a 32-inch 4K VA-panel monitor - this is incredibly useful, right off the bat, as it'll make transitioning from a 4K TV that many consoles are currently hooked up to, easy to undertake. You'll still get the same resolution and, extra importantly, the effects of HDR as the CG32UQ has a DisplayHDR 600 rating. This HDR excellence is backed up by glorious colors and contrasted gained by the monitor's 95% DCI-P3 rating and contrast ratio of 3000:1.

The AuraSync lighting feature is a real highlight on this monitor too. Offering the ambient lighting that only some TVs do (in the UK), the backlighting effects that this monitor offers, really helps to separate it from the pack. It's not just a gimmick too as it'll mimic on-screen colours and make for an immersive, impressive show.

On top of that, you will still get some of ASUS's quality monitor techs as standard: FreeSync, GameFast mode, flicker-free pictures, and a very handy remote control. For a full verdict check out our ASUS CG32UQ review.

Samsung CRG5

(Image credit: Samsung)

Samsung CRG5 24-inch

An entry-level PS5 monitor for high-fresh action

Specifications
Screen size:: 23.5-inch
Aspect ratio:: 16:9
Resolution:: Full HD; 1920x1080
Brightness:: 250cd/m2
Response time:: 4ms
Viewing angle:: 178/178 degrees
Contrast ratio:: 3,000:1
Reasons to buy
+120Hz refresh support+VA panel technology+Very low price
Reasons to avoid
-No HDR support-Not 4K

On a tight budget? Don’t panic. Because it’s actually possible to bag a high-refresh 1080p monitor with a curved premium panel from one of the biggest brands in the business. And all for Under $150 / £150. We give you the Samsung GRG5 in 24-inch trim.

The highlights start with a 24-inch curved VA panel. It’s not HDR compliant. But thanks to the 3,000:1 contrast, it’s actually capable of more dynamic range than many monitors that claim HDR capabilities. It also sports an 1800R curve, for added immersion. 

Predictably, at this price point, we’re talking 1080p rather than 4K. But then if you want that super smooth high-refresh experience, you’re not going to get it at 4K. Likewise, at 24 inches this is hardly a huge or cinematic screen. But, once again, something has to give to hit this level of affordability.

As a gaming-focused monitor, it has several additional gaming-friendly features including low input lag mode. If there is a catch, it’s probably pixel response. Samsung quotes 4ms, which isn’t too shabby. However, that’s a grey-to-grey time and this is a VA panel, so expectations in terms of pixel speed probably need to be kept in check.

ViewSonic VX2768-PC-MHD

(Image credit: ViewSonic)

ViewSonic VX2768-PC-MHD

Frugal high-refresh 1080p fun

Specifications
Screen size:: 27-inch
Aspect ratio:: 16:9
Resolution:: Full HD; 1920x1080
Brightness:: 250cd/m2
Response time:: 1ms
Viewing angle:: 178/178 degrees
Contrast ratio:: 3,000:1
Reasons to buy
+Full support for 120Hz refresh+High-contrast VA panel+Remarkably affordable
Reasons to avoid
-No HDR support

The 27-inch panel sports a tight 1500R curve for that immersive, wrap-around feel and is based on VA technology. The implications of VA tech include outstanding static contrast of 3,000:1, plus punchy colours and good viewing angles. VA technology used to suffer from poor pixel response. But the latest generation of panels is much improved. Consequently, ViewSonic reckons the VX2768-PC-MHD is good for 1ms response times.

The kicker, of course, and the key enabler of high frame rates is the 1,920 by 1,080 as opposed to 4K native resolution. It is a significant step down versus 4K when it comes to detail and sharpness. But 1080p is still two million pixels and for fast-paced games, the improved response and buttery smooth frame rates are arguably more important than the pixel count. 

You don’t get HDR support either. But then true HDR was never going to be available at this ultra-aggressive price point. In short, this monitor represents an awful lot of high-refresh fun for the money and makes a neat, underrated PS5 monitor contender.

Acer Predator CG7

(Image credit: Acer)

Acer Predator CG7

Big-screen 4K HDR thrills

Specifications
Screen size:: 43-inch
Aspect ratio:: 16:9
Resolution:: 4K; 3840x2160
Brightness:: 1,000 nits
Response time:: 1ms
Viewing angle:: 178/178 degrees
Contrast ratio:: 4,000:1
Reasons to buy
+Mega 43-inch 4K panel+VA tech delivers huge contrast+Up to 144Hz for ultra-responsive gaming
Reasons to avoid
-Not a true HDR panel-Backlight is edge-lit-Very pricey

Acer’s beastly 43-inch Predator CG7 has been updated with HDMI 2.1 support, and that helps to make it one of the best PS5 monitors going now. As ever, the branding of the new variant is confusing. It’s the Acer Predator CG437KP you want, the additional ‘P’ on the end being the critical indicator of the updated model - the prices you see here are for that and the links will take you to the right place.

Specs-wise, the VA panel is the real 4K deal and good for fully 1,000 nits of brightness and 1ms responses, albeit that 1ms stat is not the usual gray-to-gray, but Acer’s Visual Response Boost mode, which comes at the cost of brightness. Just as important it’ll hit the full 120Hz thanks to that HDMI 2.1 upgrade (connected to a PC it’ll go even faster - 144Hz). 

As for colour accuracy, Acer reckons the CG7 is good for 90 percent of the DCI-P3 gamut, which isn’t too shabby. The CG7 is also DisplayHDR 1000 certified. However, it only has 14 edge-lit dimming zones rather than full-array local dimming, so it’s not the full HDR deal. That said, the inherent 4,000:1 contrast of the VA panel combined with that powerful 1,000 nits brightness means that this is about as good as it gets with having full-array dimming.

Samsung U32J590

(Image credit: Samsung)

Samsung U32J590

4K thrills for the masses

Specifications
Screen size:: 32-inch
Aspect ratio:: 16:9
Resolution:: 4K; 3840x2160
Brightness:: 270 nits
Response time:: 4ms
Viewing angle:: 178/178 degrees
Contrast ratio:: 3,000:1
Reasons to buy
+Great colours and contrast+4K native resolution+32-inch panel size
Reasons to avoid
-60Hz refresh-No HDR support-Only 270 nits

We’d all love a 4K, 120Hz, HDR monitor with a mini-LED backlight that cranks out 1000 nits and delivers 1ms pixel response. Back in the real world, such panels barely exist. Anything that comes close costs megabucks.

Which is where the Samsung U32J590 comes in handy. For not much more than 300 bucks, you get a big, beautiful 32-inch 4K panel with excellent 3,000:1 contrast thanks to a quality Samsung VA panel. Of course, VA tech isn’t exactly synonymous with speedy pixels. But Samsung is the master of fast VA panels and this one is rated at a decent 4ms GtG.

Inevitably, the specs are a little limited in other areas. Refresh is pegged at 60Hz, so there are no 120Hz thrills. You also don’t get HDR support, local dimming or any of that fancy next-gen backlight technology. Indeed, peak brightness is quoted at 270 nits, which is towards the lower end of what we’d deem acceptable. But it should be good enough for all but the very brightest environments.

As an affordable PS5 monitor and introduction to the PS5’s 4K highs, this is a very appealing proposition. We’d just steer clear if esports and online shooters are your main gaming aim.

Gigabyte G27F

(Image credit: Gigabyte)

Gigabyte G27

Affordable IPS gaming for a PS5 monitor

Specifications
Screen size: 27-inch
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Resolution: 1,920 x 1,080
Brightness: 300 nits
Response time: 1ms (MPRT)
Viewing angle: 178/178 degrees
Contrast ratio: 1,000:1
Features: 144Hz, variable refresh rate, DisplayPort, 95% DCI-P3; HDMI type HDMI 1.4 x2
Reasons to buy
+Good quality 27-inch IPS panel+144Hz refresh+95% coverage of DCI-P3
Reasons to avoid
-No HDR support-Lacks some brightness-Not the quickest IPS tech around

Good image quality. High refresh. Fast pixel response. All for a price you can afford? Yup, the Gigabyte G27F ticks some very important gaming boxes for a PS5 monitor. Of course, at this price point, you can’t have everything. Most notably, you can’t have all eight million pixels that come with full 4K; this is a 1080p model.

This does mean that the lower resolution leads to faster frame rates which can be critical in online shooters and battle royale games, including the likes of Fortnite, where low latency is king in a very competitive environment.

There's no HDR support here, but it's worth remembering that an awful lot of supposedly 'HDR' monitors are nothing of the sort. In fact, hardly any monitors are capable of true HDR visuals, so, the Gigabyte G27F’s lack of HDR is largely academic. And it’s not as if it implies poor panel quality: Gigabyte says the G27F is good for 95 percent of the DCI-P3 gamut, which is better than some content creation panels.

If there is a weak spot, it’s likely to be the response time. Gigabyte claims 1ms pixel response, but courtesy of the MPRT metric. The best IPS monitors achieve 1ms via the more demanding gray-to-gray standard. Still, the Gigabyte G27F is hardly a slouch and, for the money, it’s very appealing.

Philips Momentum 55 review

(Image credit: Philips)

Philips Momentum 559M1RYV

Really big, mostly beautiful - and built for consoles

Specifications
Screen size:: 55-inch
Aspect ratio:: 16:9
Resolution:: 4K; 3840x2160
Brightness:: 1,200 nits
Response time:: 4ms
Viewing angle:: 178/178 degrees
Contrast ratio:: 4,000:1
Reasons to buy
+Huge 55-inch panel+Full 4K and 120Hz experience+Crazy bright at 1,200 nits
Reasons to avoid
-Pixel response is ‘only’ 4ms-HDR performance is middling-Expensive compared to TVs

With the first of what’s set to be a whole family of console-optimised monitors, Philips has gone big with the Momentum 559M1RYV, all 55 inches of it. Philips says that low latency is one of the Momentum’s core features and what marks it out from 4K TVs. So, yes, this is the full 4K Monty with HDMI 2.1 and support for up to 144Hz refresh, making it an ideal PS5 monitor to consider if you like all things large display-wise

VRR or variable refresh rate support is also included, which bodes well for both response and fluidity. Even more impressive is the VESA DisplayHDR 1000 certification. In fact, the Philips Momentum 559M1RYV peaks at an eye-popping 1200 nits peak brightness in HDR mode. Even in SDR mode, it’ll hit a heady 750 nits. Ouch.

The detailed spec includes VA panel technology with excellent 4,000 to one static contrast and impressive 95 percent coverage of the demanding DCI-P3 colour space. A Bowers & Wilkins soundbar is also included as standard. As a big-screenPS5 monitor option, then, this Philips panel looks promising. But not quite perfect.

The response is rated at 4ms, whereas the best LCD monitors are rated at 1ms. Moreover, this monitor has only just been announced and it’s not clear if this monitor supports local dimming. Without it, it won’t be a true HDR display, whatever the certification. Still, the sheer scale of this thing will be spectacular for anything graphically intensive, from cinematic driving games to the eye candy-infested escapades of Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla.

Note: this monitor will become available in the US this holiday season.

What is the best monitor specs for PS5?

Objectively, the 'best' specs to aim for are 4K resolution, HDR, a 120Hz refresh rate, and definite HDMI 2.1 connectivity - though the latter two are one and of the same. 

However, as all the models on this page prove, there's a multitude of different approaches to take when looking at specs - especially when 4K 120Hz monitors are still on the expensive side. If you are happy with a 1080p resolution, then you may well find that a speedy HD monitor will hit the spot, for example.

If you're after something 'traditional' then head over to our best gaming TV guide as well as our best TV for PS5 and Xbox Series X, best OLED TV, and best 120Hz 4K TV guides which will all see you right.

Jeremy Laird

A serious dissertation on the finer points of input lag and overshoot followed by a forensic examination of AI-accelerated temporal upscaling. Such is a routine day in the working life of long-time tech wordsmith, Jeremy Laird. Along with GamesRadar, Jeremy’s 15-year back catalogue includes a host of tech and gaming outlets, including TechRadar and PC Gamer, not to mention contributions to mainstream media from the Independent to the Evening Standard. Complimenting Jeremy’s debilitating addiction to all kinds of digital hardware, he is also afflicted by an obsession with and a significant occupational sideline in cars and automotive technology.