The Andor post-credits scene finally answers age-old Clerks debate

Andor
(Image credit: Lucasfilm)

Andor season one has ended, but not without a post-credits scene. The scene in question actually harkens back to another piece of pop culture, Kevin Smith's Clerks, and solves a long-standing debate between main characters Dante and Randall.

In the Andor season one finale, we see the first Death Star (the Empire's answer to nuclear warfare AKA a moon-sized space station with the ability to destroy an entire planet) being constructed. In Clerks, best friends and coworkers Dante (Brian O'Halloran) and Randall (Jeff Anderson) get into a heated debate: Return of the Jedi sees the Rebellion blow up the second Death Star while it's in the process of being made, essentially saving the day. On one hand, destroying the first Death Star previously is a good thing, because it's a weapon of mass destruction, but on the other hand, destroying it while under construction could mean killing innocent civilian workers. So, who built the Death Star?

The post-credits scene shows the first Death Star being made using pieces that Andor himself helped craft during his time in prison. Those pieces, however, are being assembled by droids. Assuming that the two Death Stars were made in the same way, we can likely extrapolate that no independent contractors or workers died during the building of the second Death Star... because it was assembled by machines. We can't wait to hear what Smith, a mega Star Wars fan himself, has to say about this.

Andor season 2 doesn't yet have a release date, but you can check out our guide to all the upcoming Star Wars movies and TV shows to see what's coming up in the galaxy far, far away. 

Lauren Milici
Senior Writer, Tv & Film

Lauren Milici is a Senior Entertainment Writer for GamesRadar+ currently based in the Midwest. She previously reported on breaking news for The Independent's Indy100 and created TV and film listicles for Ranker. Her work has been published in Fandom, Nerdist, Paste Magazine, Vulture, PopSugar, Fangoria, and more. Her first collection of poetry, "FINAL GIRL," sold out of print. Her second collection, "Sad Sexy Catholic," is forthcoming in 2023.