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The best gaming TVs in the UK: perfect 4K TVs for PS4 and Xbox One in 2020

Best gaming TVs in the UK
Best gaming TVs in the UK (Image credit: Future)

The best gaming TVs are, we think, the televisions you should always consider whatever you're looking for a new TV to actually do: be it games, of course, entertainments or even use with a PC, the best gaming TVs are often the best TVs out there, period. Modern TVs have gaming modes and settings basically by default now, but they also are, by default, naturally good at presenting games to us as they just happen to be very well optimized for gaming.
The best gaming TVs often feature in lists of best TVs, generally, as they share their ability with games with their quality at presenting movies, entertainment, and everything else too. Plus, importantly, getting a new TV in the form of one of the best gaming TVs is a big deal and incredibly exciting.

Getting a caveat in early, the standard of 4K TVs generally nowadays means we are spoilt for choice: it's almost harder to find a bad one for games. Also, each of the major manufacturers regularly releases more or updated models to pad out their selection and mark each new year with an update - but that doesn't mean they automatically go into this guide. That being said, if you like the look of the models below, you may want to follow the links and find the latest and greatest in that iteration.

When it comes to picking the best gaming TV for you, there are several factors to take into consideration. First off, it's likely that the TV is not purely going to be used for gaming, so you need to make sure it's the right one for your home in terms of size, usability, and efficacy for movies, TV and every day use too, to mention but a few. Plus it really isn't just about picking the priciest or the shiniest: the range of quality 4K TVs now available now, you can now get a good gaming TV for far less money. Predictably, the scale is real and can climb to ridiculous amount with the premium panels; these will cost many thousands of your hard-earned bucks), and while a bunch of them won't be worth it, the higher-end models do provide a gaming panel that will take your experience to the next level visually offering extra detail and vibrancy that the cheaper models can't come close to matching. The upward trend of higher price means more and better TV, does apply here also in the realm of features and bells and whistles, too. More upmarket TVs will bag you more intricacies, with some of them often being geared toward gaming. With such a wide variety to choose from, we're here to help you get the best gaming TV for your needs.

It's relentlessly realistic and true to life, but you have to consider your budget and, concurrently, what size of television you ideally want. While, of course, you shouldn't spend more on a TV that just doesn't fit a wall or is way too big for a smaller room, we have also never heard anyone complain that their TV is 'too big'. Ever. You just have to have your sensible hat on a bit here and know where you're definitely putting it and then aim for the biggest appropriate size (budget depending).

Oh, and if you're on the lookout for something truly massive, you'll want to consider one of the best projectors going.

UK 4K TV retailers: Amazon UK | Currys | John Lewis | AO | Very | Argos

Best gaming TVs for 2020

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LG OLED 55C8PLA

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LG OLED 55C8PLA

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LG OLED 55C8PLA

1. LG OLED65E9PUA - 65-inch 4K TV

The best gaming TV in the UK right now

Screen size: 65 inches | Tuner: Freeview/Freesat HD | Resolution: 3840x2160 | Refresh Rate: 60Hz | Panel technology: OLED | Smart TV: Yes | Curved: No | Dimensions: 1440(w) x 810(h) x 220(d)mm

The best black levels
Extraordinarily good picture quality and clarity
Built-in G-sync
Still only 60Hz
Expensive
Colors on QLEDs are almost always better

If you've got some decent money to spend on a 4K TV, this is currently the one to get. OLEDs are superb for gaming, as they give you unparalleled black levels and thin panels that produce razer-sharp pictures. The most detailed pictures you'll find in all TVs. The E9 series from LG is the best of the OLEDs. This LG panel gives you a solid 60Hz refresh rate, which is fine for gaming but makes up for it with plenty of features that help you smooth motion further on the TV. It's got a great design and has enough HDMIs to accommodate a variety of devices, and  LG TVs are now using G-Sync tech which is even better for PC players looking for a gargantuan screen. Team that with the built-in game mode and you have exceptional smooth gaming pictures coming from what is still, just a television.

There are a few small caveats, however, that you should take into account: the sound is relatively poor for such an expensive set, so you should pair it with a speaker set-up of quality pair of gaming headphones. While screen-burn is an issue on OLED panels, you should only worry here if you're displaying static images on the screen for several hours per day, several days per week. And LG's user interface isn't quite as simple and fast as the one found in Samsung TVs. But now we're nitpicking really.

If it sounds like an unusually negative description of our top TV... that's because the image quality, upscaling, and deep black levels are so good, they trump everything else. (Note, this model is called E9PLA in the UK.)

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Samsung Q60R

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Samsung Q60R

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Samsung Q60R

2. Samsung Q60R - 55 inch QLED 4K TV

The best value QLED TV, and it's currently under £1000

Screen size: 55 inches | Resolution: 3840x2160 | Refresh Rate: 120 Hz | Panel technology: QLED | Smart TV: Yes | Curved: No | Dimensions: 1226(w) x 777(h) x 50(d)mm

Vibrant picture
Very fast panel
Loads of features
Blacks not as deep as OLED

Such was the popularity of Samsung's 2018 Q6FN, that the newest model - the Q60R - is available in a wide variety of sizes, and a genuinely superb price. For less than £1000 you can get this entry-level QLED panel, which offers more vibrant pictures than any other type of TV. It's sharp too, although the black levels don't quite match LG's OLED range. While the Q60R doesn't benefit from some of the fancier features in the high-end Samsungs, like Direct Full Array (it's edge-lit), it brings incredible HDR, a 120Hz refresh rate, and speakers that perform well above average for standard TV audio.

All Samsung's QLED range have solid Game Modes (this 2019 model comes with Real Game Enhancer) that boost refresh rate to maximum and response rate to below 10ms, and while this does come at the cost of the HDR brightness, it's worth the slight cut. It has Freesync too. The Q60R also has voice control (via the admittedly inconsistent Bixby - we suggest pairing with Alexa instead), the excellent Samsung Universal Guide and interface, and a bunch of streaming services built into the TV. The bright colours really are the star of the show here, and like all QLEDs this TV can light up a dark room while maintaining wonderfully sharp images. There's no risk of screen-burn with this tech either. 

If budget is an issue, Samsung does a 43" version of this TV, but we'd recommend 55" or above.

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Samsung UE55RU8000

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Samsung UE55RU8000

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Samsung UE55RU8000

3. Samsung UE55RU8000 - 55 inch 4K TV

One of the most well-balanced mid-range TVs around

Screen size: 55 inches | Tuner: Freeview HD | Resolution: 3840x2160 | Refresh Rate: 120 Hz | Panel technology: LED | Smart TV: Yes | Curved: No | Dimensions: 1226(w) x 710(h) x 54(d)mm

Brilliant value
Very good uniformity for an LED
Supports HDR10
Black levels in a dark room aren’t the best

Unless you’ve recently robbed a bank, there’s a good chance you may not be able to afford Samsung’s premium QLED TVs. But fear not! This reasonably priced LED is a cracking mid-range performer. The RU8000 sports the sort of good looks that belie its aggressively set price point, while the sub-10ms input lag when hooked to a 4K source like a PS4 Pro or Xbox One X makes this Sammy more suitable for competitive gamers than many displays that cost twice as much. You get a lot of great TV for your money here.

Are there compromises? Of course. An edge-lit backlight means black levels can’t compete with OLED screens, though in the RU8000’s defence, general screen uniformity is very good, with few signs of clouding or the dreaded smudginess of dirty screen effect. Though it’s not quite a standout HDR performer, the fact this display supports HDR10 and HLG (Hybrid-Log Gamma) should be commended. HDR pictures never get bright enough to knock your socks off – peak brightness only measures in at around 365nits – but luckily, the RU8000 is truly excellent in SDR mode. If you’re not overly fussed about class-leading HDR performance, and want a brilliant, fairly priced TV, this Samsung will delight.

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4. Hisense H50B7100UK - 50-inch 4K TV

The best budget 4K TV

Screen size: 50 inches | Tuner: Freeview HD | Resolution: 3840x2160 | Refresh Rate: 60 Hz | Panel technology: LED directlit | Smart TV: Yes | Curved: No | Dimensions: 1127(w) x 656(h) x 86(d)mm

Excellent value
Lightweight
Solid, un-flashy performance
Needs calibration straight out of the box
Overall pictures can't compete with more premium models

If your budget is limited but you're still gunning for that expansive and beautiful 4K resolution then a Hisense TV might well be for you. And this 50-inch model is as good a budget option as you'll likely find. It's a 2019 model so it's a recent release ad has all the necessary bits and bobs that area required of a 4K TV for the modern home. 

Considering it often goes for around £300, the pictures this Hisense provide are pretty impressive and perfectly solid for getting a 4K gaming experience into your home. You'll have to do some optimising straight out of the box to get the most out of the 7303, as it's colours can be a bit off. But the HDR comes good and provides some solid pictures for your game. Considering Hisense prices these brilliant budget TVs for less than the price of an Xbox One X, their input lag of less than 50ms is a fair trade off and probably relatively reasonable, and it's overall lightweight design means it's a great contender for a tidy on-the-wall display too. They make great choices for 2nd or 3rd TVs if you have a separate gaming area and aren't looking to splash the cash too. Looking for an awesome £3-400 4K TV? Your search is over.  

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6. Sony Bravia X900F series

A superb set oozing Sony's Bravia quality

Screen size: up to 85 inches | Resolution: 3840x2160 | Refresh rate: 120Hz (X-Motion Clarity) | Panel technology: LED | Smart TV: Yes | Curved: No

Strong picture clarity
Best black levels on an LED set
Much faster than OLED
Flat sound
Poor viewing angles
Sony premium included

Impressive contrast ratio, good black uniformity, strong local dimming, and a tremendous HDR experience are on the pro front. In general, this is a great set for gamers, given the excellent pixel response times. While the 8F (as an OLED) has almost 38 ms response times, which is a bit too slow for Rocket League, FIFA or Call of Duty, the X900F is faster with 24ms at 4K/60Hz (Though it also claims 120Hz refresh rate with the built-in X-Motion Clarity).

Sony has made a couple of very weird decisions about this TV, though: only 2 HDMI ports use the full HDMI 2.0 bandwidth and that’s not enough - most TV sets have 4 ports minimum. And while the sound gets pretty loud, it lacks clarity and depth. However Sony hasn’t done a perfect job with its 2018 models: the viewing angle is quite poor, and colors fade out heavily when you don’t play directly in front of it, but these ring true of TVs on the whole so shouldn't put you off this great set from Sony.

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7. Sony X950G - 75-inch UK TV

The best premium size and scale gaming TV - for a premium price

Screen size: 75 inches | Resolution: 3840x2160 | Refresh Rate: 120 Hz | Panel technology: LCD | Smart TV: Yes | Curved: No | Dimensions: 1674(w) x 961(h) x 69(d)mm

Sleek design
Good cable management
Sony levels of premium picture quality
Built-in Chromecast
Excellent remote
Volume and bass are on the weak side
Backlighting doesn't match the premium-ness of the TV

If you're looking to go big with your gaming TV and go premium, then you can't get much better than this 75-inch monster from Sony. On top of the 'general' premium nature of Sony's panels, including awesome picture quality, look-at-it-from-anywhere viewing angles, and good features, there is a great Android TV system within, as well as a built-in Chromecast and loads of apps. If you want to play games on a wall-filling panel that oozes premium quality, then this is ane easy recommendation to make and easily one of the best gaming TVs going. It's near bezel-less design is quite nice too. The full package - on a monster scale - from Sony.

Jargon buster - here's what 4K TV tech actually does

4K

This is the resolution of the image that can be displayed by your TV. 4K refers to the resolution 3840x2160 pixels. It's also referred to as UHD or Ultra HD by some broadcasters or manufacturers. Basically, if a TV can display pictures in 3840x2160 it can be called a 4K TV or 4K ready TV. PS4 Pro and Xbox One X can both output a signal in 4K, and send it to your 4K TV. Almost all modern gaming TVs are 4K.

HDR

HDR means High Dynamic Range. Almost all 4K TVs come with HDR as standard, and it's a technology used to process colours within games, movies, and TV shows. HDR isn't strictly about contrast - it's a way of making the difference more noticeable between colours (and blacks), and HDR can actually be used by game makers and developers to pick out more details in their creations. Primarily, HDR is used to boost the colour of a picture by making colours more vivid, thereby contrasting them further. If you can separate very similar shades of colour, then you can create clearer images. The minimum standard for HDR is a brightness of 400 nits (the measure of brightness on a TV), although some TVs manage 2000 nits in 2019. 

OLED

This stands for Organic Light Emitting Diode, and it's a type of TV panel. Basically, while LCD and plasma panels require something called back-lighting or edge-lighting to create pictures on screen, OLED panels don't need it. With back-lit or edge-lit TVs, the LEDs in the panel are illuminated in groups or lines to create a picture. With OLED TVs, each LED on screen can be individually lit - switched on or off to create a picture. This is what allows for truer blacks in OLED sets. With the ability to completely switch off each individual LED, you get sharp edges on images and deep blacks because there is no backlight showing through at all.

QLED

This is Samsung's own technology, and it stands for Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode. Quantum Dots are particles, which are lit to create a picture on screen, and they can get much brighter than LEDs or QLEDs. This means QLED sets offer brighter colours and better contrasts than any other panel type. The panel is still either back-lit or edge-lit like traditional 4K TVs, and this can make a huge difference when it comes to black levels. Back-lit QLEDs can not only deliver the vivid colours, but they can also produce sharp images and blacks that rival premium OLEDs. This makes them perfect for gaming.

Response time

You'll hear a lot about the response time of a panel, especially when discussing gaming TVs. This is basically the speed at which a colour can change on your TV (eg. from black to white to black again). Most 4K TVs have response times quicker than we can perceive them, so it makes no real difference to gameplay outside the twitchiest of shooters. However, purists will want a TV with the quickest response time possible.

Refresh rate

This is the speed at which an image can be refreshed on your TV (and shouldn't be confused with response time). Basically, most TVs offer 60Hz-120Hz, although no 4K TV has anything higher and if you want 144Hz or even 240Hz, you need a contender for best gaming monitor. A 60Hz 4K TV, for example, refreshes the image on screen 60 times per second, which allows a certain level of smoothness to the image. If the TV refreshes at 120Hz, the image is twice as smooth, and you notice that in how slick the motion appears on screen. Many TVs 'game modes' will boost refresh rate artificially, usually by downgrading other display features (eg. reducing the brightness of your picture).

HDMI

This stands for High Definition Multimedia Interface, and it's the standard connection cable between your 4K TV and most devices. You need at least an HDMI 1.4 cable to carry a 4K signal, although most modern HDMIs are 2.0 cables, capable of carrying 4K signals at 60 frames per second. The majority of modern console games can't display at 4K 60fps, so as long as you have a 2.0 cable and 2.0 port on your TV, you're fine. And no, you don't need to buy expensive gold-plated HDMI cables to get a better picture - just the Amazon Basics will do just fine.

I'm one of Hardware Editors for GamesRadar+, and I take care of a whole host of gaming tech reviews, buying guides, and news and deals content that pops up across GamesRadar+. I'm also a qualified landscape and garden designer so do that in my spare time, and lean on it to write about games' landscapes and environments too.