Mafia II lamp is the most badass light fixture we've ever seen

Super-detailed, limited-edition gun sculpture arrives to promote the game's impending release

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The Aug. 24 release of Mafia II is just a couple of weeks away. So to remind us, publisher 2K sent over one of the most simultaneously awesome and ridiculous pieces of swag we%26rsquo;ve ever received: a limited-edition lamp in the shape of an M1911 automatic pistol, one of the many guns that feature prominently in the game.

You may have already heard of these around mid-July, when 2K released photos of Snoop Dogg trying out the game at 2K%26rsquo;s office and proudly displaying his own lamp in front of a couple of Mafia II posters. And now we have one. Does having a lamp put us in the same class as an international superstar like Snoop? We like to think so.

As you can see in the following pictures, the gun is impressively detailed and looks awfully close to the real thing. It%26rsquo;s a little smaller and a lot lighter, though, and the wide, heavy base and lampshade make it poorly suited to the task of frightening an intruder or keeping it concealed in your jacket as you stalk the mean streets of 1940s Empire Bay. Sadly, the lamps are limited to 200 pieces and won%26rsquo;t be available for sale or as pre-order bonuses, butwe can at least give you a closer look:


Above: We%26rsquo;re guessing the lampshade isn%26rsquo;t limited edition, if that Target REstyle sticker is anything to go by


Above: It%26rsquo;s naked! Also if you squint really hard, the bulb socket almost looks like a silencer


Above: At first I thought this meant we had the 19th numbered lamp, but then I realized it was upside-down. Still, being in the double digits at all counts for something, right?


Above: Oh, like this wouldn't be the first thing you'd do

Aug 5, 2010

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

After graduating from college in 2000 with a BA in journalism, I worked for five years as a copy editor, page designer and videogame-review columnist at a couple of mid-sized newspapers you've never heard of. My column eventually got me a freelancing gig with GMR magazine, which folded a few months later. I was hired on full-time by GamesRadar in late 2005, and have since been paid actual money to write silly articles about lovable blobs.
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