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Hideo Kojima is taking questions on Twitter and his first answers are a treat

(Image credit: Kojima Productions)

Hideo Kojima is fielding one question a day on Twitter, offering insights into his current film favorites, why he likes to let you shower and pee in games, and more.

Kojima started Hideo's Musings yesterday in celebration of Death Stranding's PC release. He plans to answer one question a day and will 'try his best' to keep going for as long as possible. Oddly, he didn't actually say where he's getting any of these questions, or how you should submit yours, but I guess @ing his official Twitter account is a good start.

His first question was about actors, filmmakers, and artists who currently have his attention. Most of it is above my paygrade in terms of contemporary cinema, but everybody can appreciate that quick callout for The Old Guard's Luca Marinelli as Solid Snake. That is a strong pick and I hope Metal Gear Solid movie director Jordan Vogt-Roberts is paying attention (of course he's paying attention, the dude loves Kojima like a father). 

The second question, answered today, asks why Kojima always includes such a broad range of tones and activities in his games: in one scene mourning the death of the president of the United States of America, and just minutes later opening the proverbial floodgates after slamming four cans of Monster in a row.

"Video games, unlike films, are a medium that has the player experience in real time. That is why I have the cutscenes transition seamlessly to and from gameplay, without affecting the flow of time," Kojima explains. "For Death Stranding, Sam eats, drinks, water, and even takes a leak sometimes [...] You need to incorporate these elements, or else the game will be a bit strange."

I mean, lots of video games cut from one scene to another without telling a real-time story and it doesn't feel strange. Just because you can show more of a person's life when you don't need to worry about fitting into theatrical slots or in between commercials doesn't mean you need to. But in a Kojima Productions game you do, and that's rad - this is a great piece of insight into Kojima's idiosyncratic approach to game design.

In the days ahead, we'll see what else Kojima has to say about his previous projects, his interests, and maybe even his next game if we're lucky.

See what else is on the horizon with our look at the best upcoming games of 2020 and beyond. 

Connor has been doing news and feature things for GamesRadar+ since 2012, which is suddenly a long time ago. How on earth did that happen?