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The Tragedy of Macbeth trailer has arrived – and Joel Coen's take on Shakespeare looks stunning

The Tragedy of Macbeth has been told many, many times – but never quite like this.

The first trailer for Joel Coen's Shakespearian adaptation has been released, and the upcoming black-and-white movie looks a shoo-in this awards season. Denzel Washington plays Macbeth, who three witches prophesies will one day rule Scotland. Encouraged by the poisonous words of Lady Macbeth – here played by Frances McDormand – the Scotsman's ambitions become deadly. Watch the trailer above.

The new trailer also features brief appearances from Brendan Gleeson as King Duncan and Harry Melling as Malcolm. Other cast members include Corey Hawkins as Macduff, Ralph Ineson as The Captain, and famed stage actor Kathryn Hunter as the three witches.

The Tragedy of Macbeth has been written and directed by one half of the Coen brothers, Joel Coen, and is the filmmaker's first solo project without Ethan. The movie is set to make its world premiere at this year's New York Film Festival on September 24, with its theatrical release on December 25, followed soon after by its streaming release on Apple TV Plus on January 14. The movie will also play at this year's London Film Festival.

The visuals featured in the first trailer look unworldly for a reason – the entire movie was shot on soundstages. Production was also shutdown midway through due to the Coronavirus pandemic.

Coen's last picture was The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, directed by himself and his brother. That film went on to receive three Academy Awards – and no doubt The Tragedy of Macbeth will be looking to pick up a few Oscar nods early next year.

Until then, be sure to check out the most exciting upcoming movies heading our way over the next year.

Jack Shepherd

I'm the Entertainment Editor over here at GamesRadar+, bringing you all the latest movie and TV news, reviews, and features, plus I look after the Total Film and SFX sections and socials. I used to work at The Independent as a general culture writer before specializing in TV and film