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Google Stadia now works on Xbox Series X thanks to Edge browser

Google Stadia now works on Xbox Series X thanks to Edge browser
(Image credit: Google)

Google Stadia can run on Xbox Series X thanks to the latest Edge Chromium browser update.

Xbox testers who have access to the Alpha Skip Ahead (opens in new tab) build have been upgraded to the Chromium version of Microsoft Edge on their Xbox consoles, which has allowed players to get Google Stadia up and running on the Xbox Series X. This video was posted by Tom Warren from The Verge (opens in new tab), showing Google Stadia indeed running on an Xbox Series X. He loads up Destiny 2 and it all looks to be working fine, though we don’t see any gameplay in this short clip.

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Microsoft replaced its Edge browser with a new Chromium (which is the underlying architecture behind Google Chrome) version last year, and that new and improved version is finally making its way to the Xbox consoles. So far this updated console version of the Edge browser is only available for people in the Xbox Insider Program, but once testing is done the update will be released to the wider public.

While both Google Stadia and Xbox Series X share a broadly similar library, there are a couple of Stadia exclusives that you could check out on your Xbox Series X. Plus, if you already own a game on the Stadia and don’t want to buy it again on the Xbox then this is an option for you. It's an exciting prospect in terms of what the future holds for Stadia, if Google’s streaming service could effectively run on your Xbox.

If streaming one games console inside another seems like blasphemy to you, you can also check out the best Xbox Series X games available right now.

Ian Stokes

Ian Stokes is an experienced writer and journalist. You'll see his words on GamesRadar+ from time to time, but Ian spends the majority of his time working on other Future Plc publications. He has served as the Reviews Editor for Top Ten Reviews and is currently leading the tech and entertainment sections of LiveScience and Space.com as the Tech and Entertainment Editor.