FFFFF 11 222 000 000 11 F 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 FFFF 1 22 0 0 0 0 1 F 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 F 11111 22222 000 000 11111 GGGGG A M M EEEEE GGGGG U U IIIII DDDD EEEEE G A A MM MM E G U U I D D E G GG AAAAA M M M EEEE G GG U U I D D EEEE G G A A M M E G G U U I D D E GGGGG A A M M EEEEE GGGGG UUUUU IIIII DDDD EEEEE F1 2001 GAME GUIDE by Jamie Stafford/Wolf Feather FEATHER7@IX.NETCOM.COM Initial Version Completed: October 19, 2001 Version 3.1.1 Completed: March 12, 2001 ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== ACCOLADE: The F1 2001 Game Guide won the FAQ of the Week contest at GameFAQs (http://www.GameFAQs.com/) for the week of October 28, 2001 :-) SPECIAL NOTE #1: This game guide is for the year 2001 F1 game released by EA Sports, NOT the one released in the same week (in the States) by 989 Sports. Also, I DO NOT intend to write a guide for the 989 Sports F1 game, as I find it to be severely lacking in many areas, and quickly returned it to the store. SPECIAL NOTE #2: Just as with my guide for F1 Championship Season 2000, I have submitted this full guide to the EA Sports F1 development team for comments. Unfortunately, they have yet to respond, but I hope they will shortly. When I submitted the F1CS2K guide, it took nearly a month to receive a response, whereas barely two weeks have passed thus far. GUIDE NOTE: Those interested primarily in car set-ups may instead wish to view/print the F1 2001 Car Set-ups Guide. As changes are made to car set-ups in the Car Set-ups Guide, the changes will also be made in this (full) guide accordingly. JOIN THE FEATHERGUIDES E-MAIL LIST: To be the first to know when my new and updated guides are released, join the FeatherGuides E-mail List. Go to http://www.coollist.com/group.cgi?l=featherguides for information about the list and to subscribe for free. ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== CONTENTS Spacing and Length Permissions Introduction Assumptions and Conventions Race Order: 2001 Season The New Physics Engine Quick Race Challenge Mode Tips Grand Prix Tire Care General Tips Completely Subjective Section A Major Problem: FIA Rules 2001 Season Times Advertisers A1 ABN-AMRO Agip Air Canada Allianz Alpine AMP Aral ARCOR Banco Real Bridgestone Canon Casino (de Montreal) Casio Chevrolet D2/Mannesmann Daimler-Chrysler Deutsche Post/Deutsche Post World Net EuroBusiness Evenrudee Firestone France Fuji Television/Fuji TV FujiFilm GPF1 Honda HSBC Ipiranga Jaguar Keimin Magneti Marelli Malaysia Melbourne MillionCard Mobil 1 Monaco Grand Prix Monaco Monte Carlo Grand Hotel NGK Nicos Nikon Nokia Orange Panasonic Pastor Petronas PIAA Pioneer Pony Canyon Potenza Qantas Sao Paulo SAP Shell/Helix Siemens Spa-Francorchamps Toenec United States Grand Prix Vodafone Zepeter International Parts Used in Set-ups Suggested Set-ups Suggested set-up for Australia (Albert Park) Suggested set-up for Malaysia (Sepang) Suggested set-up for Brazil (Interlagos) Suggested set-up for San Marino (Imola) Suggested set-up for Spain (Catalunya) Suggested set-up for Austria (A1-Ring) Suggested set-up for Monaco (Monaco) Suggested set-up for Canada (Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve) Suggested set-up for Europe (Nurburgring) Suggested set-up for France (Nevers Magny-Cours) Suggested set-up for Great Britain (Silverstone) Suggested set-up for Germany (Hockenheim) Suggested set-up for Hungary (Hungaroring) Suggested set-up for Belgium (Spa-Francorchamps) Suggested set-up for Italy (Monza) Suggested set-up for the United States (Indianapolis) Suggested set-up for Japan (Suzuka) Grand Prix of Australia: Albert Park Grand Prix of Malaysia: Kuala Lampur Grand Prix of Brazil: Interlagos Grand Prix of San Marino: Imola Grand Prix of Spain: Catalunya Grand Prix of Austria: A1-Ring Grand Prix of Monaco: Monte Carlo (Temporary Street Circuit) Grand Prix of Canada: Gilles Villeneuve Grand Prix of Europe: Nurburgring Grand Prix of France: Nevers Magny-Cours Grand Prix of Great Britain: Silverstone Grand Prix of Germany: Hockenheim Grand Prix of Hungary: Hungaroring Grand Prix of Belgium: Spa-Francorchamps Grand Prix of Italy: Monza Grand Prix of the United States: Indianapolis Grand Prix of Japan: Suzuka Wish List Thanks Wrap-up Contact Information ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== SPACING AND LENGTH For optimum readability, this driving guide should be viewed/printed using a monowidth font, such as Courier. Check for font setting by making sure the numbers and letters below line up: 1234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012 ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz This guide is EXTREMELY lengthy - this version is NEARLY 120 PAGES LONG (definitely my longest game guide to date) in the Macintosh version of Microsoft Word 98 using single-spacing in Courier 12 font. Therefore, it may not be a very economical idea to print out this guide in its entirely!!!!! Those primarily interested in just car set-ups should instead use my F1 2001 Car Set-ups Guide, which is 'only' 29 pages in length. ============================================== PERMISSIONS Permission is hereby granted for a user to download and/or print out a copy of this driving guide for personal use. However, due to the extreme length, printing this driving guide may not be such a good idea. This driving guide may only be posted on: FeatherGuides, GameFAQs.com, f1gamers.com, Games Domain, PSXCodez.com, Cheatcc.com, gamesover.com, Absolute-PlayStation.com, RedCoupe, InsidePS2Games.com, CheatPlanet.com, The Cheat Empire, a2zweblinks.com, Gameguru, cheatingplanet.com, neoseeker.com, ps2fantasy.com, and vgstrategies.com. Please contact me for permission to post elsewhere on the Internet. Should anyone wish to translate this driving guide into other languages, please contact me for permission(s) and provide me with a copy when complete. Remember: Plagiarism in ANY form is NOT tolerated!!!!! ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== INTRODUCTION F1 2001 is the latest entry in EA Sports' line of F1-based games for (originally) the PlayStation and (now) the PlayStation2. F1 Championship Season 2000, the game immediately preceding F1 2001, marked EA Sports' first foray of the series to the PS2, but F1CS2K was actually released in two 'flavors:' PSX and PS2. F1 2001 is thus the first PS2- only game of the series. And what an introduction it is for the PS2-only line of the series!!!!! The graphics and sounds are better than before, the creativity behind the game (especially the unlockable features) provide far more repeat gameplay, multitudes of options have been added to customize gameplay much more than ever before in the series, the computer-controlled drivers REALLY dice for position (sometimes going four-wide!!!), and the game's controls (using a standard controller) are much more challenging than in previous incarnations of the series without stepping beyond what can be reasonably expected of the average gamer. Most likely, if you play F1 2001, then you are at least a casual fan of F1 racing, and have at least a basic knowledge of many or all of the F1 courses currently in use. That knowledge certainly does help when first playing F1 2001, and vice versa - as any extensive gameplay greatly helps in determining where the drivers are on each course when races are televised. The final segment of this driving guide provides information to help you to cleanly drive each course. Even those who know the courses fairly well and/or play the game regularly can always use tips. Please note that much of this information comes from the driving guide I wrote for F1 Championship Season 2000 (the predecessor to F1 2001), also by EA Sports. Those who have read and/or downloaded the driving guide for F1CS2K will already have the same basic information covered in this driving guide. This driving guide has been modified and expanded to reflect the many additions in F1 2001, including the minor circuit alterations included in the game (such as the initial chicane at Monza). Also, the Tire Care section is modified as appropriate from my GT3: Tires Guide, also available at FeatherGuides and at many gaming Web sites. ============================================== ASSUMPTIONS AND CONVENTIONS Most race circuits outside the United States name most corners and chicanes, and even some straightaways. Where these names are known, they will be included in parentheses and referenced in the explanatory text. These names have been gathered from course maps available on the courses' official Web sites, my memory of how F1 races have been called by American TV sportscasters (Fox Sports Net and SpeedVision, in 1999 and 2000), and/or from the Training Mode of F1 Championship Season 2000 (corner/segment names are listed at the bottom of the screen). To the extent possible, these names have been translated into English. ============================================== RACE ORDER: 2001 SEASON F1 2001 presents the courses in the order in which they were presented for the 2001 Formula 1 season. This driving guide will follow the same convention, which will be especially useful for those playing in Championship Mode. However, Quick Race presents the circuits in a different order, and all but the first three must be unlocked. F1 Race Schedule, 2001 Season: March 4 Australia Albert Park March 18 Malaysia Kuala Lampur April 1 Brazil Interlagos April 15 San Marino Imola April 29 Spain Catalunya May 13 Austria A1-Ring May 27 Monaco Unnamed (Street Circuit) June 10 Canada Circuit Gilles Villeneuve June 24 Europe Nurburgring July 1 France Nevers Magny-Cours July 15 Great Britain Silverstone July 29 Germany Hockenheim August 19 Hungary Hungaroring September 2 Belgium Spa-Francorchamps September 16 Italy Monza September 30 USA Indianapolis October 14 Japan Suzuka NOTE: The 2002 F1 race schedule is available at the official FIA Web site (http://www.fia.com/). The race schedule also has links to the official Web sites of most of the permanent and temporary (street) circuits hosting F1 races. ============================================== THE NEW PHYSICS ENGINE F1 2000 and F1 Championship Season 2000 both essentially used the same physics engine; the physics engine for F1CS2K was tweaked to provide more options and more realistic handling over its predecessor, but the differences were certainly not colossal. F1 2001 presents a brand-new physics engine which itself renders the game more difficult than any of the earlier incarnations in the series. Anyone trying to drive in F1 2001 the same way as in earlier versions of the game will find the corner workers scraping the car off the barriers. However, there are a few survivability tips for the new physics engine: 1.) For F1's famous standing starts, try to time the use of the accelerator with the exact millisecond the lights go out. This is extremely important for both reducing wheelspin and making several excellent passes at the beginning of a race, especially important for those at the back of the grid. Also, the gear ratio setting will play a significant role in just how fast you can come up to speed; a short gear ratio will provide quick acceleration and can result in instantly gaining several positions, whereas a long gear ratio produces the slowest acceleration and will likely result in losing several race positions before coming up to full speed. 2.) Braking is always important in racing. However, the new physics engine demands SMOOTH braking (especially if using Simulation handling), which often means braking rather early compared to prior versions of the game. Slamming on the brakes often results in wheel lock and/or car spin, which can induce flat-spotting on the tires and tremendously increases the risk of collision - especially with the Tire Wear option activated. 3.) Similarly, even after the standing starts, the use of the accelerator is much more important in F1 2001 than in previous versions of the game. By exercising extreme care with both the brakes and the accelerator, anyone can rapidly learn to essentially glide through corners at a rather quick speed. A pristine racing line is also important in these situations, as the changes in G-force and velocity need to be constantly kept in check if you want to remain on the official course. 4.) As noted above, the new physics engine also demands a very clean racing line. This is especially important if attempting to clear tight chicanes at high speed. 5.) I personally find it sometimes easier to take tight corners WITHOUT braking. In these cases, simply let off the accelerator and coast toward and through the corner until the appropriate acceleration point, usually at or just beyond the apex. One very good place to attempt this strategy is at the initial corners at Kuala Lampur (Malaysia), although this tactic can have rather dire consequences at the start of a race with all the cars bunched together. ============================================== QUICK RACE One of the more interesting additions to F1 2001 over previous incarnations of the series is the need to acquire points to unlock new Quick Race circuits. Initially, only Silverstone, Hockenheim, and Monza are available. By placing sixth or better in races at these circuits, you can earn points which will accumulate, allowing you to eventually open more circuits in Quick Race Mode. Points are distributed in accordance with FIA regulations: First Place: 10 points Second Place: 6 points Third Place: 4 points Fourth Place: 3 points Fifth Place: 2 points Sixth Place: 1 point Others: 0 points The final circuit in Quick Race Mode - Monaco - can only be opened by accumulating 100 points. This means a minimum of ten WINS can unlock ALL Quick Race circuits. If your goal is to unlock all Quick Race circuits as quickly as possible, you may wish to simply keep playing one or two circuits repeatedly if you are a 'natural' at those circuits and can win consistently. Also, to unlock as many circuits as quickly as possible, you MUST stay out on the circuit for the entire race (if it is a short race, 4 or 8 laps), as you will not have any time to change to/from rain tires. Of the three initially-available courses, Silverstone is the most technical, while Hockenheim and Monza are both fast, high-speed circuits tempered with just a few tight corners. For those new to F1 racing games, I suggest beginning with the Monza circuit, followed by Hockenheim and Silverstone, in that order. ============================================== CHALLENGE MODE TIPS General: To truly learn how to handle an F1 car, Challenge Mode is perhaps the best place for beginners to start with F1 2001. No matter how much F1 racing experience you might have from other games (within or without the EA Sports F1 series), it is always a good idea to watch the Demonstration video before attempting each challenge for the first time; subsequent viewings may also be necessary. In general, leaving the circuit is automatic disqualification in Challenge Mode; unfortunately, the CPU is not very consistent in determining when you are 'off the course,' as I have both been in the grass and not disqualified, and 'on' the circuit when the CPU has decided that I should be disqualified. The Basics Challenge 1.1 (The Start): Try to time the use of the accelerator with the exact millisecond the timer hits zero (the starting lights are not used for this challenge). Wheelspin can cause your car to inadvertently change its initial trajectory angle, so if you do get wheelspin on the start, be prepared to countersteer immediately to keep to the pavement. Challenge 1.2 (Braking): Make use of stationary objects around the circuit to judge the timing of your braking. This is a good, general tip for every racing game you ever play. Challenge 1.3 (Cornering): This challenge takes place in the Lesmo corners (Turns 7 and 8) at Monza. Beware the barrier on the inside of each corner, and take care not to oversteer due to excessive speed. Challenge 1.4 (Chicane): Fortunately, F1 2001 does not have nearly as much of an uphill approach to the Bus-stop Chicane (Spa-Francorchamps) as the real circuit. Still, you need to slow enough to not overshoot the exit of the initial part of the Bus-stop. For the latter portion, beware the barrier on the right on exit. Challenge 1.5 (Hairpins): The hairpin here is a blind right-hand corner, so your braking zone is actually much earlier than you might otherwise anticipate. Also, do not be fooled by the extension of road continuing straight ahead along the approach trajectory to the hairpin. Wet Conditions Challenge 1.1 (Start/Stop): Make use of stationary objects around the circuit to judge the timing of your braking. This is a good, general tip for every racing game you ever play. This challenge takes place on the oval portion of the U.S. Grand Prix circuit at Indianapolis. Challenge 1.2 (Cornering): Be extremely gentle with the throttle here in the second sector at Kuala Lampur. If you are attempting to complete all the challenge events in order, this will certainly be the most difficult and frustrating thus far. Challenge 1.3 (Chicane): This is the start of a lap at Interlagos (Brazil) with its famous and deadly blind steep-downhill left-hand Turn 1. Make use of stationary objects around the circuit to judge the timing of your braking. This is a good, general tip for every racing game you ever play. Challenge 2.1 (Dry Tires, Wet Road): While even a moderate F1 driver will NEVER be caught out on a wet circuit with dry tires, you need to know how to use the throttle to accelerate AND brake, especially through the Stadium section at Hockenheim. Pit Stops Challenge 1.1 (Braking/Empty Tank): If you can survive the chicane at the top of the rise just beyond the starting point, you should do well here, especially if you refrain from braking. Challenge 1.2 (Braking/Full Tank): Similar strategy to Braking/Empty Tank. Challenge 2.1 (Interactive Pit): This challenge begins literally several meters from the entry to the next-to last corner at Hungaroring, which means that your most difficult task will actually be navigating this tight left-hand J-turn while still carrying significant speed. If you can clear this turn and not oversteer yourself into the left-side barrier, simply follow all the on-screen prompts within several milliseconds of their appearance to even have a CHANCE of successfully completing this challenge. Challenge 3.1 (Tire Wear/French Tires): Beware the final corners of this challenge, where it is a little more difficult to see the pavement turning ahead. Challenge 3.2 (Tire Wear/Worn Tires): Too much braking will result in heading off-circuit. Race Craft Challenge 1.1 (Manual Transmission): Listen closely to the engine to determine when to upshift. Challenge 2.1 (Damage): All that matters is beating the pre-set time, not keeping the car off the barriers (which is nearly impossible at Monaco even when the car is NOT damaged in any way). Challenge 3.1 (Oil Leaks): Try not to lean on the accelerator too much. Coasting through corners is a good idea. Challenge 4.1 (Penalties): Very similar to entering Pit Lane in Interactive Pit (PIT STOPS, Challenge 2.1). Challenge 4.2 (Flags): You must be EXTREMELY attentive here, as some waving flags are difficult to see, especially when shown by corner workers standing directly in front of a grandstand along the circuit. Track Experience This section consists of seventeen challenges - one for each circuit of the 2001 F1 season, in season order. For each circuit, the challenge is to complete a lap at or better than the posted time. Please see the detailed driving instructions for each circuit, listed later in this guide, for helpful information in successfully driving each of these circuits. ============================================== GRAND PRIX Grand Prix offers several racing possibilities, but all pay out points in accordance with FIA rules: First Place: 10 points Second Place: 6 points Third Place: 4 points Fourth Place: 3 points Fifth Place: 2 points Sixth Place: 1 point Others: 0 points These points are given to both the cars' drivers AND the cars' teams (constructors) for the Drivers Championship and Constructors Championship; in effect, the points do 'double duty.' Those concerned about winning both championships should elect to play as a driver from a team with a strong track record (pardon the pun) for winning: McLaren, Ferrari, etc. However, in my experiences thus far with F1 2001, this does not often hold true; for example, playing as Michael Schumacher and doing really well often results in Rubens Barichello spending most of the race well out of the Top Ten, although he does occasionally run within the points-paying positions (usually in fifth or sixth place). Single Grand Prix allows the player to engage in a full Grand Prix weekend, from Practice to Qualifying to Warm-up to Race. One or more of these sessions can be skipped, allowing the player the possibility of starting immediately with Race. However, those who do not attempt to qualify will be immediately placed at the back of the starting grid, which can present its own challenges - especially in a short (4- or 8-lap) race. Teammate Challenge has really only one rule: You MUST finish each race ahead of your teammate. Although winning each race is certainly a nice and perhaps lofty goal, that is not the actual challenge in these races. Playing with damage, flags, etc., all turned off will give you a bit of an advantage, allowing you to shortcut corners without penalty, bump other cars out of your way without receiving race-ending damage yourself, etc. Teammate Challenge takes place on the 2001 F1 circuits, presented in season order (as if in Full Championship mode). There are eleven teams in F1 2001, so Teammate Challenge can be completed within the first eleven races of the season. Unfortunately, the player is not given the option of choosing a driver within each team, which would be a nice addition to Teammate Challenge. Custom Championship allows players to create their own F1 season by selecting two or more F1 circuits in any order. Want to start with the 'easy,' high-speed circuits (Hockenheim, Monza) and end with the difficult, technical circuits (Monaco, Suzuka)? Want to have a season in reverse of the 2001 order (Suzuka, Indianapolis, Monza, Spa- Francorchamps, etc.)? This is the place to use one's creativity!!! Full Championship follows the 2001 F1 season in order. As in Single Grand Prix, each venue includes Practice, Qualifying, Warm-up, and Race. One or more sessions can be skipped, allowing the player to start immediately with Race. However, those who do not attempt to qualify will be immediately placed at the back of the starting grid, which can present its own challenges - especially in a short (4- or 8-lap) race. Domination Grand Prix has just one rule: Win EVERY race of the season. The easiest way to accomplish this feat is to use Normal Handling on Easy in dry weather with no tire wear with FIA Rules off. The fastest way to accomplish this is to use 4-lap races without qualifying. However, Domination must be unlocked, which is where a GameShark2 can come in quite handy for those who really want to get to it as soon as possible. ============================================== TIRE CARE At the beginning of a race and immediately after a Pit Stop, the tires are brand new ('stickers') and need to be brought up to temperature as quickly as possible so that they can provide the best possible grip. During this period, sharp turns or extremely-fast cornering will almost certainly cause the car to slide, and perhaps even spin. However, slides and spins will bring the tires up to optimum temperature even faster, so you may wish to purposely induce slides when entering corners, but only with extreme caution, as the already-thin line between having control of the car and losing control of the car will be at least halved until the tires come up to optimum temperature. The longer you run on the same set of tires, the more you need to take better care of your tires. This is especially important if you have had one or more off-course excursions. You may experience slides when cornering. If you have several offs with the same set of tires and find yourself sliding around the circuit a lot more than usual, you definitely need to return to Pit Lane for a new set of tires. Essentially, you are driving on pure ice, and the only way to 'reliably' get around the circuit is to bounce off the rails - which is extremely difficult to do 'correctly' to keep yourself pointed forward. One of the best ways to reduce the durability of the tires is to corner at high speeds. The manual for Gran Turismo 3 gives an excellent, detailed description of what occurs with the tires when cornering. In short, cornering at high speeds causes a high percentage of the tire to be used for speed, and a low percentage to be used for the actual cornering. To combat this and thus extend the durability of the tires, try to brake in a STRAIGHT line before reaching a turn, thus reducing overall speed and providing a lower percentage of the tires to be used for speed, and a greater percentage used for cornering. Note that if the percentage of the tires used for speed is too high compared to the percentage used for cornering, the car will slide and/or spin. ============================================== GENERAL TIPS A general tip for ALL racing games is to successfully complete ALL the license tests in any game of the Gran Turismo series. This is a great way to learn how to handle cars of all drivetrain formats and horsepower ratings in a wide variety of situations - starting and stopping, J-turns, right-angle corners, chicanes, blind turns, wet racing conditions, etc. This will all be very handy for virtually ANY racing/driving game you ever play, and the Gran Turismo games are also extremely good to have in your PSX/PS2 collection (especially GT3). The most important tip for those who have played the previous games in EA Sports' F1 series is to mentally throw out everything you learned from the other games in terms of handling and course configurations. The physics engine of this game is so incredibly different from previous incarnations of the series that using the exact same driving style is a great way to find yourself plowing into an immovable barrier (or another car) at top speed. While the circuit configurations are in essence the same, the details (of both the circuit itself and surrounding objects, such as hills and sand traps) have changed at most venues, as well as corner corner/chicane configurations. When first playing F1 2001 (irrespective of whether or not you have played the preceding games in the series), play with flags, damage, etc., set to off, and with weather set to dry; also, use Normal Handling. This will give you the best possible (and most forgiving) conditions for learning how to handle the cars in F1 2001. As you progress with the game, add weather, damage, Simulation handling, etc. Because of the new physics engine, the use of the accelerator becomes much more of an issue in F1 2001 than in earlier games of the series. In fact, I find that using the brakes is sometimes counterproductive, while cautious regulation of the accelerator is often a better choice. F1's standing starts can either give you a great advantage, or put you at the back of the pack. To reduce or eliminate wheelspin from a standing start, try to time the use of the accelerator with the exact millisecond the lights go out. If you use the accelerator too soon, you WILL have wheelspin, which can cause flat-spotting in the rear tires and can even cause your car to go askew so that it points in a trajectory taking you directly OFF the circuit (or into a barrier). Also related to the standing starts, if you are deep in the pack, the car directly in front of you is likely to produce A LOT of smoke (and spray, if in wet conditions at the beginning of a race) due to wheelspin. If at all possible, swing to the edge of the pavement immediately to avoid an early accident if you can get off the line a lot sooner than the car in front. Some circuits are set up so that there is either wide pavement on the Pit Straight or an expanse of pavement unofficially part of the main circuit itself (such as the right side of the pavement at Monza); making use of these areas can allow you to swing out wide to avoid incidents, and also get you clear of traffic so that you can REALLY slam on the accelerator and pass huge numbers of cars before the initial corners of the circuit. The new AI in F1 2001 produces some interesting challenges in terms of action on the track. For example, I have several times seen a group of cars four-wide on the Pit Straight at Monza (coming off the Curva Parabolica) as they dice for position. If you are coming up quickly upon a pack of slower cars involved in a heated battle for position, this can be a particularly challenging situation, especially if you are yourself being pursued rather aggressively. Try to analyze the movements of the cars in front of you and look for an opening. However, remember that most CPU-controlled cars use the exact same racing line, so once they fall into line for a corner or a chicane, dart up past them and try to outbreak them into the corner/chicane (IF you have confidence in your brakes and reflexes). Speed Assist (which automatically handles braking when cornering) can be great when first learning a course. However, to be truly effective in these races, Speed Assist should be turned off. This will allow YOU to handle braking (if wanted) while cornering, and will generally allow you to have MUCH more speed in corners. This translates to more difficult handling, as cars will always handle better when going slow than when going fast (assuming the car set-up has not been changed). This also means that passing while cornering will be much easier - and much more dangerous. For those who wish to shortcut corners, deactivating Speed Assist will also help to keep your momentum as you drive through sand and/or grass. If you REALLY want to achieve fast lap times and generally be much more competitive in a race, then Speed Assist simply MUST be deactivated. Some circuits have distance-to-corner markers in anticipation of tight and/or (semi-)blind corners. While these markers are useful, DO NOT completely rely on them, as they may 'disappear' as the race progresses. These markers can be knocked down by a car which slips or is forced off the pavement, and the markers are not replaced. Therefore, try to use permanent objects (such as grandstands or trees) to judge the braking zone for a corner or chicane. ALWAYS listen attentively to the team radio communications; this will give you information about your teammate's progress and the condition of your own car, as well as alert you to any incidents on the circuit, such as spins, cars with smoking engines (which often leak oil), etc. Especially when you hear that another car has a problem, always be on the lookout for EXTREMELY slow cars in the indicated sector of the circuit - cars WILL come to a complete stop in the middle of the pavement, and if you are playing with Flags off, it is quite easy to miss seeing the slowed/stopped vehicle until it is too late to take evasive action. If you are assigned a Stop-Go Penalty, you will also receive radio communications instructing you when to come to Pit Lane to serve the penalty. For those playing with Simulation Handling, it is important to note that using long gear ratios will produce an automatic loss of position for the standing starts due to the inherent decreased acceleration. However, there are times when the decreased acceleration can be of tremendous benefit, such as taking a series of tight S-curves quickly without the need for braking (such as through Bechetts at Silverstone). The most obvious benefit to long gear ratios is the higher top- end speed, yet the long gear ratio must be matched with medium or low downforce settings for the wings to force the car into seventh gear (in automatic transmission) on long straightaways (such as Rettilineo Parabolica at Monza). Drafting can be a very valuable technique for passing, especially on high-speed circuits with long straightaways. Drafting entails closely following a car, and allowing that car's aerodynamic vacuum to draw your car closer and closer while simultaneously giving your car a short boost in speed; just before colliding with the other car, dart out to the side and speed past as the 'extra' speed gained slowly drains away. This tactic is best used on long straightaways, and can be a prime passing method when combined with late braking at the end of a straightaway. If at all possible, try to draft off multiple cars, making several passes at once while gaining a TRULY dramatic spike in top-end speed. However, QUICK reflexes and good tire grip are very important to edging your car far enough out of the way to safely make a pass while drafting, otherwise you will ram or clip the lead car. Also, in F1 2001, some CPU-controlled cars will actually slow (sometimes significantly) if you try to use their aerodynamic wake to pass, adding more necessity to a player's quick reflexes. F1 2001 features CPU-controlled opposition which is FAR more competitive and relentless than in previous incarnations of the series. However, this also means the competitors are absolutely ruthless. Should you have an off or an on-track accident, do not expect those behind you to give you room to rejoin the race. Instead, the competitors will often plow into you at full throttle, knocking your car around like a snowboarder at Tokyo Megaplex. While this certainly presents some interesting visuals in Replay mode, this can very quickly become frustrating... and costly, as you will likely find yourself at the very tail end of the pack once you can recover. ============================================== COMPLETELY SUBJECTIVE SECTION My favorite circuits are: Albert Park Imola Monaco (to watch a race, not to actually race - especially since I was able to visit Monaco in 1991) Hockenheim Spa-Francorchamps Monza (my personal 'test course' for the game) Suzuka My least favorite circuits are: Interlagos (but NOT because of any falling billboards!!!) Nurburgring Monaco (to race) A1-Ring Kuala Lampur My favorite corners/segments: Albert Park: Turns 11 and 12 Silverstone: Bechetts Monaco: The Tunnel and the entry to the Swimming Pool Chicane Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve: Nurburgring and Turns 12 and 13 Hockenheim: The Stadium Spa-Francorchamps: La Source, Red Water, and Blanchimont Monza: Ascari (especially at full speed) and Curva Parabolica Indianapolis: Turn 13 (Indy/NASCAR Turn 1) Suzuka: Degner and 130R My least favorite corners are: Monaco: Everything but The Tunnel and the entry to the Swimming Pool Chicane Spa-Francorchamps: Bruxelles Most hairpins (especially at Nurburgring) My favorite Pit Lanes (based on Pit Entry) are at: Imola Spa-Francorchamps Monza Indianapolis My least favorite Pit Lanes (based on Pit Entry) are at: Albert Park Interlagos Monaco A1-Ring Hungaroring Kuala Lampur My least favorite Pit Lane (based on Pit Exit) is at: Interlagos My favorite teams are: Ferrari Prost Jaguar My least favorite team is: McLaren ============================================== A MAJOR PROBLEM: FIA RULES My only MAJOR complaint about F1 2001 is its implementation of FIA rules, which includes the use of flags. While I personally WANT to race with flags active, the implementation of the rules is FAR too oppressive - to the point that I have thrown the controller in frustration several times, and will probably need to buy a new one soon. What makes the FIA Rules option oppressive is how the Yellow Flag is used, particularly in accident situations. For example, as a highly aggressive driver, I tend to get into accidents or at least bump tires with someone fairly often. When this happens, if the other car has even one pixel ahead of my car, then ends up spinning or otherwise slipping behind me while I am able to keep going, the Yellow Flag is often presented instantly, and a $@#%^#&*!@ Stop-Go Penalty assigned for supposedly 'Passing Under the Yellow Flag.' Also oppressive is the Yellow Flag speed limit of 130MPH. When the Yellow Flag is first displayed, the CPU does not allow enough time for the player to see the Yellow Flag waved (or its indicator at the top-right of the screen) and slow appropriately, resulting in a $@#%^#&*!@ Stop-Go Penalty. When it comes to serving a Stop-Go Penalty, F1 2001 DOES NOT follow the official rules, which state that a driver can make no more than three complete laps before coming to Pit Lane to serve the Penalty. F1 2001 allows the car to cross the Start/Finish Line ONCE without serving the Penalty; crossing the Line again results in instant disqualification. THIS MUST BE FIXED IN FUTURE INCARNATIONS OF THE GAME. While not necessarily a problem, I personally wish that the 107% rule would be enforced. The 107% rule means that anyone qualifying with a time higher than 107% of the race's pole position is deemed to not have qualified. Granted, this then makes it possible that the player may be the only one participating in a race (especially if shortcutting where 'permitted' during qualifying), or that a player not qualify well enough to compete in a race. I have been unable to check this, but if there is a minimum speed rule in F1 racing, the game definitely needs to implement this rule as well. There have been several times when a super-slow car, or even a car stopped on the track in an area without a Yellow Flag displayed, has suddenly 'appeared from nowhere' and - due to my closing speed at top acceleration - caused me to crash. I know NASCAR has a minimum speed rule (which is even more important on oval- based tracks), but I would be surprised if a similar rule did not exist in F1 racing. ============================================== 2001 SEASON TIMES This section is provided to give players a benchmark as to how they fare in F1 2001 compared to the actual F1 drivers on the same circuits. This information was taken on October 20, 2001, from the official FIA Web site - http://www.fia.com/FreePress/FIA_F1_Guide/Classification.html 2001 Pole Position Times (by Grand Prix) Australia 1:26:892 Michael Schumacher Malaysia 1:35:220 Michael Schumacher Brazil 1:13:780 Michael Schumacher San Marino 1:23:054 David Coulthard Spain 1:18:201 Michael Schumacher Austria 1:09:562 Michael Schumacher Monaco 1:17:430 David Coulthard Canada 1:15:782 Michael Schumacher Europe 1:14:960 Michael Schumacher France 1:12:989 Ralf Schumacher Britain 1:20:447 Michael Schumacher Germany 1:38:117 Juan Pablo Montoya Hungary 1:14:059 Michael Schumacher Belgium 1:52:072 Juan Pablo Montoya Italy 1:22:216 Juan Pablo Montoya United States 1:11:708 Michael Schumacher Japan 1:32:484 Michael Schumacher 2001 Fastest Race Lap Times (by Grand Prix) Australia 1:28:214 Michael Schumacher Malaysia 1:40:962 Mika Hakkinen Brazil 1:15:693 Ralf Schumacher San Marino 1:25:524 Ralf Schumacher Spain 1:21:151 Michael Schumacher Austria 1:10:843 David Coulthard Monaco 1:19:424 David Coulthard Canada 1:17:205 Ralf Schumacher Europe 1:18:354 Juan Pablo Montoya France 1:16:058 David Coulthard Britain 1:23:405 Mika Hakkinen Germany 1:41:808 Juan Pablo Montoya Hungary 1:16:723 Mika Hakkinen Belgium 1:49:758 Michael Schumacher Italy 1:25:073 Ralf Schumacher United States 1:14:448 Juan Pablo Montoya Japan 1:36:944 Ralf Schumacher ============================================== ADVERTISERS This section is for those who have noticed the billboards and painted grass at the seventeen race venues and wondered about the entities (companies, organizations, countries, cities) indicated. Nothing in this section will help with game performance, but the information contained here may be interesting nonetheless. The information here is alphabetical by entity, with the Grand Prix featuring that entity's advertisements and some information about the entity (where such information is available, it is taken directly from the entity's Web site). I believe I have included every entity with at least one billboard shown in F1 2001; please feel free to contact me to add, update, or correct any information, especially with the billboards at Suzuka written in Japanese. A1 Locations: Austria Information: This is the host circuit of the Grand Prix of Austria. Web Site: http://www.a1ring.at/ ABN-AMRO Locations: Brazil Information: ABN-AMRO Holding N.V. is a universal banking group offering a wide range of commercial and investment banking products and services on a global basis through the Company's network of approximately 3,600 offices and branches in 76 countries. Web Site: http://www.abnamro.com/ Agip Locations: San Marino, Spain, Austria, Europe, Great Britain, Hungary, Italy Information: Agip Lubricants started its operations in South Africa in 1973 and has since then operated as a producer, importer and distributor of high quality lubricants and special products. Web Site: http://www.agip.co.za/ Air Canada Locations: Canada Information: One of the best-known Canadian airlines. Web Site: http://www.aircanada.ca/home.html Allianz Locations: Austria, Europe Information: Allianz' development into one of the world's leading insurance providers has progressed steadily since the end of the 19th century. Web Site: http:/www.allianz.com/ Alpine Locations: Japan Information: Alpine Electronics of America, Inc., is the industry-leading manufacturer of high performance mobile electronics, founded in 1978. Alpine is the only manufacturer specializing in mobile multimedia, an integrated system approach incorporating digital entertainment, security and navigation products for your mobile entertainment. As a consolidated subsidiary of Alps Electric Co., Ltd., one of the world's premier manufacturers of electronic components for computer, communications and car electronic equipment, Alpine is the specialized supplier of quality mobile electronics systems. Web Site: http://www.alpine1.com/ AMP Locations: Australia Information: AMP is the premiere brand in the connector and interconnection systems industry. Established in 1941, AMP continues to be recognized for innovative products of the highest quality including electrical and electronic connectors, IC sockets, fiber optic products, premises cabling and application tooling. Web Site: http://www.amp.com/ Aral Locations: Japan Information: Since the foundation of the company, now more than 100 years ago, we have never tried harder to meet the growing requirements of our customers on a daily basis. Top quality, exemplary service and futuristic innovations are what guarantee our success. Today the Aral brand stands for different areas of business, for example our service station business and fuel and lubricant business, each offering a wide range of products and services for motorists consumers, companies and industry. Web Site: http://www.aral.com/ ARCOR Locations: Germany Information: ??? (The site is entirely in German... and I cannot read German.) Web Site: http://www.arcor.de/home/index.php Banco Real Locations: Brazil Information: This bank is a subsidiary of ABN-AMRO. Web Site: http://www.real.com.br/ Bridgestone Locations: Australia, Malaysia, Brazil, San Marino, Spain, Austria, Monaco, Europe, Great Britain, Germany, Hungary, Belgium, Italy, United States, Japan Information: Bridgestone Corporation, based in Tokyo, is the world's largest manufacturer of tires and other rubber products. Bridgestone and its subsidiaries operate 46 tire plants and 52 plants for diversified products in 24 nations and market their products in more than 150 nations. The companies' diversified business includes automotive components, industrial products, construction and civil engineering materials, bicycles, sporting goods, and precision parts for electronic equipment. Web Site: http://www.bridgestone.com/ Canon Locations: San Marino, France, Japan Information: Canon started out as a company with a handful of employees and a burning passion. That company soon became a world-renowned camera maker and is now a global multimedia corporation. Canon will continue using its technologies to benefit people as it pursues its objective of becoming a company that is loved by people throughout the world. Web Site: http://www.canon.com/ Casino (de Montreal) Locations: Canada Information: Each of the world's great cities has a memorable attraction, a gathering place that draws people back time and again. In Montreal, its the Casino where the pace is fast, the fun is non-stop and the buzz is all about having a great time. Web Site: http://www.casinos-quebec.com/francais montreal/dhtml/index_montreal_NS.html Casio Locations: Japan Information: Casio Computer Co., Ltd., is one of the leading consumer electronics companies in the world. Since its establishment in 1957, Casio has been active in the development of electronic calculators, timepieces, musical instruments, LCD TVs, pagers and other communications devices. Casio's corporate activities are guided by the motto: 'Creativity and Contribution.' Web Site: http://www.casio.com/ Chevrolet Locations: Brazil Information: Chevrolet (Chevy) makes a variety of cars, trucks, and SUVs, from the Camaro to the Corvette to the Astro to the S-10. Web Site: http://www.chevrolet.com/ D2/Mannesmann Locations: Germany, Belgium, Italy Information: Mannesmann has been taken over by Vodafone (see below). Web Site: http://www.mannesmann.com/ Daimler-Chrysler Locations: United States Information: This company merged in the late 1990s. The highly-visible Chrysler side of the company sells the PT Cruiser and 300M, among other vehicles. Web Site: http://www.chrysler.com/ Deutsche Post/Deutsche Post World Net Locations: Europe, France, Germany, Italy Information: Deutsche Post World Net is one of the largest logistics groups in the world. We make systematic use of the opportunities arising from globalization and digitization by providing top-quality services and technologies for our customers throughout the world. Our strategy foresees the intelligent interlinking of global flows of goods and information and the financial transactions associated with them. With this goal in mind, we are expanding our Group with determination and developing increasingly comprehensive one-stop-shopping options in keeping with customer wishes. Web Site: http://www.deutschepost.com/ EuroBusiness Locations: San Marino, Austria Information: Magazine covering business in Europe. Web Site: http://www.eurobusiness.com/ (Web site under construction as of December 12, 2001) Evenrudee Locations: Monaco Information: ??? Web Site: ??? Firestone Locations: Australia, Brazil, San Marino, Spain, Austria, Monaco, Canada, Europe, France, Great Britain, Germany, Hungary, Belgium, Italy Information: Bridgestone/Firestone Americas Holding, Inc is an international manufacturer with 38 production facilities throughout the Americas. The Nashville, Tennessee-based company was formed in 1990 when Bridgestone U.S.A. merged with The Firestone Tire & Rubber Company. We are a subsidiary of Bridgestone Corporation. Web Site: http://www.firestone.com/ France (symbol only in the grass at Magny-Cours) Locations: France Information: Come travel in France, the host country of the Grand Prix of France. Web Site: http://www.euro-tourisme.com/db/uk/ Fuji Television/Fuji TV Locations: Japan Information: Television network in Japan; the title host of the Grand Prix of Japan. Web Site: http://www.fujitelevision.com/ FujiFilm Locations: Japan Information: Fuji Photo Film U.S.A., Inc., is dedicated to exploring the furthest reaches of technology and continuing towards a dynamic imaging and information future. A leading innovator of imaging and information products, the company has 44 facilities, offices, and photo labs throughout the United States. Web Site: http://www.fujifilm.com/ GPF1 Locations: Canada Information: ??? Web Site: ??? Honda Locations: Canada Information: Although our name is most often associated with automobiles, we are much more than that. We manufacture a wide range of products, including motorcycles, ATVs, generators, marine engines, lawn and garden equipment and automobiles. Historically, Honda has been a leader in fuel-efficiency and low-emission technology. With all of our products, we work to balance your desire for fun and performance with society's need for clean air and water. Web Site: http://www.honda.com/ HSBC Locations: Malaysia, Brazil, Monaco, Canada, France, United States Information: Headquartered in London, HSBC Holdings plc is one of the largest banking and financial services organizations in the world. The HSBC Group's international network comprises some 6,500 offices in 78 countries and territories in Europe, the Asia Pacific region, the Americas, the Middle East and Africa. Through a global network linked by advanced technology, including a rapidly growing e-commerce capability, HSBC provides a comprehensive range of financial services: personal, commercial, corporate, investment and private banking; trade services; cash management; treasury and capital markets services; insurance; consumer and business finance; pension and investment fund management; trustee services; and securities and custody services. Web Site: http://www.hsbc.com/ Ipiranga Locations: Brazil Information: Petroleo Ipiranga Companies are present on many different sectors. From the petrochemical industry to the production of bitumen, passing through the refining and distribution of fuel oil, arriving to the production of special oils. This is the explanation to the increasing strength of Ipiranga label in the competitive oil market. Web Site: http://www.ipiranga.com.br/index.html Jaguar Locations: Great Britain Information: Jaguar produces a variety of world-renowned cars, such as the XJR. Web Site: http://www.jaguar.com/ Keimin Locations: Japan Information: ??? Web Site: ??? Magneti Marelli Locations: San Marino, Spain, Austria, Monaco, France, Germany, Belgium, Italy, Japan Information: The Fiat owned Magneti Marelli Companies are international leader in the design and production of high-tech components and systems for the automotive industry. They supply the world's major car manufacturers such as Renault, CitroÎn, Peugeot, Fiat Group, Ford, Volkswagen, Audi, Seat, BMW-Rover, DaimlerChrysler, GM-Opel, Volvo, Saab, Nissan, Toyota and Daewoo. Web Site: http://www.magnetimarelli.com/ Malaysia Locations: Malaysia Information: The host country of the Grand Prix of Malaysia. Web Site: http://www.tourism.gov.my/ (Web site not responding as of December 13, 2001) Melbourne Locations: Australia Information: Melbourne is the host city of the Grand Prix of Australia. Web Site: http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/ MillionCard Locations: Japan Information: This appears to be a Japanese credit card. Web Site: http://www.mccard.co.jp/ (Web page available only in Japanese) Mobil 1 Locations: Australia, Spain, Monaco, France, Great Britain, Germany, Hungary, Belgium, United States, Japan Information: Mobil produces fuels and lubricants for cars and other vehicles; Mobil 1 synthetic oil is its best known product. Web Site: http://www.mobil.com/ Monaco Grand Prix Locations: Monaco Information: The host race of the Grand Prix of Monaco. Web Site: http://www.acm.mc/ (Web site under construction as of December 12, 2001) Monaco Locations: Monaco Information: The host country of the Monaco Grand Prix. I can say from personal experience that virtually every corner of this tiny country can be explored in a single day. Web Site: http://www.monaco.mc/ Monte Carlo Grand Hotel Locations: Monaco Information: Splendidly located between the celebrated Monte-Carlo Casino and the sea, the four-star de luxe Monte Carlo Grand Hotel offers 619 guestrooms and suites. Its modern architecture blends perfectly with the natural beauty of the Principality of Monaco and the hotel provides an exceptional range of services and leisure facilities. Web Site: http://www.montecarlograndhotel.com/ NGK (NGK Insulators, Ltd.) Locations: Japan Information: This Japanese company is divided into four areas: Power Business Group, Ceramic Products Business Group, Engineering Business Group, and Electronics Business Group. Web Site: http://www.ngk.co.jp/ Nicos (Nippon Shinpan Co., Ltd) Locations: Japan Information: Nippon Shinpan Co., Ltd. (the 'Company') engages in business based on a corporate philosophy of making consumers' lives more affluent and the corporate slogan 'Dream-Network Company.' By providing consumers with the convenience of deferred payments while at the same time providing merchants (member stores) with an advance payment system, the Company has developed its businesses while promoting sales growth with merchants. In addition to its traditional role as a comprehensive consumer-credit company with a keen understanding of the retail market, the Company has also established its role as an information systems provider through development of electronic credit settlement and other systems for promoting transactions in e-commerce. Established in 1951, Nippon Shinpan was Japan's first consumer-credit company and is now celebrating its 50th anniversary. By harnessing the unique strengths of a multisector format that includes credit card business, finance services and information systems, Nippon Shinpan pledges to move forward as the leading player in the consumer credit industry and realize consumers' dreams. Web Site: http://www.Nicos.co.jp/ Nikon Locations: Japan Information: A multi-billion dollar precision optical company with worldwide manufacturing, research and marketing capabilities, Nikon was recently ranked among America's ten most respected brands. Its cameras, lenses and accessories are used by more professional photographers than all other 35mm brands combined. Its Coolpix cameras have received more awards and top rankings than any other consumer digital camera. Its microscopes command the largest share of the US life science market, both in research and diagnostic laboratories. ... The majority of Nikon's revenues worldwide come from the sale of its semiconductor manufacturing equipment, which dominates chip fabrication facilities throughout the US, Europe and Asia. In addition, Nikon offers many other precision optical systems. For instance, it markets instruments used by eye care professionals, as well as prescription eyewear and sunglasses. Nikon construction and surveying equipment is used to help build and maintain America's roads, bridges and buildings. Nikon's binoculars and sport optics are used by outdoor enthusiasts the world over. Finally, Nikon is deeply involved in the engineering, production and quality control of manufactured goods, from plasma displays and plastics to medical devices and machine tools. Web Site: http://www.nikon.com/ Nokia Locations: Brazil Information: Nokia is the world leader in mobile communications. Backed by its experience, innovation, user-friendliness and secure solutions, the company has become the leading supplier of mobile phones and a leading supplier of mobile, fixed and IP networks. By adding mobility to the Internet Nokia creates new opportunities for companies and further enriches the daily lives of people. Nokia is a broadly held company with listings on six major exchanges. Web Site: http://www.nokia.com/ Orange Locations: Australia, Brazil, Spain, Canada, United States Information: Orange is one of the leading providers of wirefree communications worldwide and one of the first truly pan-European providers of wirefree communications services. Orange has interests in wirefree communications businesses offering a broad range of voice and data communications services in 20 countries worldwide, including 13 countries in Europe. Web Site: http://www.orange.com/ Panasonic Locations: Japan Information: Panasonic takes pride in being one of the world's premier electronics manufacturers. Not only do we make the DVD players, televisions and dozens of other consumer electronics products enjoyed by millions, but we are also a supplier of electronics components. From tiny semiconductors, to DVD-ROM drives for PCs, to flat screen plasma TV displays, Panasonic engineers are always pushing the technological envelope. In fact, many companies use our high-volume, high-speed manufacturing expertise and know-how to create even better products, just one more way Panasonic enhances lifestyles around the world. Panasonic is not only a premier maker of electronics hardware, it is also one of the largest global manufacturers of DVD entertainment software. The growing state-of-the-art Panasonic disc replication plant in Torrance, CA, supplies many of the DVD video discs Americans bring into their homes every night. Web Site: http://www.panasonic.com/ Pastor Locations: Monaco Information: ??? Web Site: ??? Petronas Locations: Malaysia, Brazil Information (concerning Petronas Motorsports): In the area of R&D, the continuous efforts involved in developing improved lubricant products for the PETRONAS - sponsored racing teams have also helped to promote technology transfer and the PETRONAS brand of products. With the use of these lubricants by the racing teams, the PETRONAS brandname is further enhanced and promoted internationally. Web Site: http://www.petronas.com/ (Web site not responding as of December 13, 2001) PIAA Locations: Japan Information: The Global leader in halogen lamp systems, PIAA Corporation was established in 1963 with the commitment to manufacture world-class products that our customers could use with pride and confidence. Today PIAA upholds that commitment by combining market driven concepts with the latest technology to make night and inclement weather driving as safe as possible. Web Site: http://www.piaa.com/ Pioneer Locations: Japan Information: Pioneer is respected for its role in such innovations as interactive cable TV, the Laser Disc player, developing the first Compact Disc player for the car and the first detachable face car stereo, DVD and DVD recording, plasma display, and organic electroluminescent display. The Company's strength in optical disc and display technology is complemented by its state-of-the-art software products and manufacturing capabilities. Pioneer also distributes music and movie titles on VHS and DVD. Offering a wide variety of titles, with a specialty in anime. Web Site: http://www.pioneerelectronics.com/ Pony Canyon (symbol only, on some FujiTV banners) Locations: Japan Information: This is a familiar symbol/name for avid fans of anime (Japanese animation); the Pony Canyon symbol is prominently featured as the main clock in the radio studio in the anime series Android MAICO 2010. Web Site: http://www.ponycanyon.co.jp/ (Web site available in Japanese only) Potenza Locations: Malaysia, United States, Japan Information: Potenza tires for cars and trucks are made by Bridgestone, the Japanese company which now owns the storied American tire manufacturer Firestone. Web Site: http://www.potenza.com/ Qantas Locations: Australia Information: Widely regarded as the world's leading long distance airline and one of the strongest brands in Australia, Qantas operates an average of 450 domestic flights a day and around 540 international flights every week, serving more than 120 destinations in 35 countries. Web Site: http://www.qantas.com.au/ Sao Paulo Locations: Brazil Information: The host state of the Grand Prix of Brazil. Web Site: http://www.lsi.usp.br/alesp/ (Web site for the Assembleia Legislativa do Estado de Sao Paulo) SAP Locations: Canada, United States Information: Founded in 1972, SAP is the recognized leader in providing collaborative e-business solutions for all types of industries and for every major market. Headquartered in Walldorf, Germany, SAP is the world's largest inter-enterprise software company, and the world's third-largest independent software supplier overall. SAP employs over 27,800 people in more than 50 countries, and all of them are dedicated to providing high-level customer support and services. Web Site: http://www.sap.com/ Shell/Helix Locations: Australia, Brazil, San Marino, Monaco, Canada, Europe, Hungary, United States, Japan Information: This company's core business include oil exploration and production, chemicals, gas and power, and oil products. Web Site: http://www.shell.com/ Siemens Locations: San Marino, Spain, Germany, Belgium, Japan Information: Over 150 years of innovation have made Siemens a world leader in electrical engineering and electronics. Today, Siemens is on its way to becoming a worldwide leading e-business company. We will use the networked know-how of our more than 460,000 employees in over 190 countries to benefit our customers and win new business - and live up to the motto: Siemens - global network of innovation. Web Site: http://www.siemens.com/ Spa-Francorchamps Locations: Belgium Information: The host circuit of the Grand Prix of Belgium. Web Site: http://www.spa-francorchamps.be/ Toenec Locations: Japan Information: About the only English on the company Web site's homepage is a Flash movie stating 'Energy & Facilities Solution.' Web Site: http://www.toenec.co.jp/ (Web site in Japanese) United States Grand Prix Locations: United States Information: The host race of the Grand Prix of the United States. Web Site: http://my.brickyard.com/usgp/ Vodafone Locations: San Marino, Europe, France, Great Britain Information: Vodafone is the largest mobile telecommunications network company in the world. It has interests in mobile networks in 28 countries across five continents. Vodafone aims to be the world's leading wireless telecommunications and information provider, generating more customers, more services and more value than any of its competitors. Web Site: http://www.vodafone.com/ Zepter International Locations: Brazil, Monaco, Canada Information: Zepter International is an organization which produces and sells exclusive high-quality consumer products around the world, principally by way of direct sales through a sales force of 120,000 consultants but also through retail outlets. Since its inception, Zepter has striven to enhance lifestyles around the world and to become an essential part of everyday living. Over the past few decades, Zepter has become a global enterprise with sales through its companies in over 50 countries across the world. Web Site: http://www.zepter.com/ ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== PARTS USED IN CAR SET-UPS Many racing games (primarily arcade-heavy games such as CART Fury) can be played with absolutely no concerns about car set-ups; other racing games (such as Le Mans 24 Hours) have so few set-up options that changing anything really does not have much effect. However, F1 2001 presents a number of set- up options in Simulation Handling, and the novice can easily become lost in trying to discern how to change the set-up options to induce or correct certain handling characteristics of a given car. While I am certainly NOT a car expert (in a real car, I can just barely find the accelerator and the radio buttons), I can present some of the basics of various parts to help tuning novices. Note that often, when one part's setting has been changed, at least one other part's setting will also need to be changed to maintain some semblance of handling. For example, if the gearbox is changed to use long gear ratios, the aerodynamics settings will likely need to be lowered to make use of the long gear ratios (otherwise, the car will have difficulty climbing into its highest gear at the appropriate speed). For another example, if the tire pressure is increased, the car will likely require soft tires to help to keep the car on the pavement when cornering (especially at high speeds). Tires Type F1 2001 presents both slick tires and wet tires. Wet tires are obviously for use in rainy conditions. Slick tires, however, come in two "flavors:" soft and hard. The hard tire compound has excellent durability, requiring fewer trips to Pit Lane to change tires, but at the cost of reduced grip of the pavement. The soft tire compound occupies the exact opposite extreme: short lifespan, superior grip. Pressure High tire pressures result in more- rounded tires, meaning that less tire surface will actually be touching the pavement, thus inherently reducing the amount of available pavement grip (regardless of the type or compound of tire used) and producing a slightly faster car due to less friction. Low tire pressures create 'flattened' tires, putting more rubber on the pavement and creating far more friction to slow the car and assist in cornering. Aerodynamics (Wings) The wings are important for downforce, the use of airflow over the front and rear of the car to keep the light, high-speed machines from taking off like an airplane and doing a backflip like the Mazda at Le Mans in 2001. A low downforce/wing setting produces faster speeds but decreases cornering ability, while a high setting will help tremendously with cornering at the sacrifice of straight-line speed. Suspension Ride Height Like aerodynamics, ride height can help or hinder a car's performance through airflow. A low ride height setting allows less air underneath the vehicle, resulting in less aerodynamic friction to slow the car. Conversely, a high ride height setting allows more air to pass underneath the car, thus increasing air friction and slowing the car (which assists in cornering). However, car performance is NOT the only consideration when setting ride height. If ride height is set too low, the car may bottom out, especially at the top or bottom of hills or when rolling over rumble strips. For short races (4-8 laps), bottoming out may not be a significant concern. However, in longer races (especially at 32+ laps), bottoming out the car could cause mechanical problems. Bump Stop The bump stop indicates the point at which the suspension will stop its vertical travel as the car speeds around the circuit. Rumble strips, debris, and generally bumpy sections of pavement will inherently cause the car's suspension to move as the vehicle passes across non-even surfaces and obstructions. F1 2001 includes two bump stop settings: high bump stop and low bump stop. If these numbers are identical, the car will have no vertical movement of the suspension, meaning that any required vertical movement for different surfaces will cause the entire car to rise as the tires pass over the obstruction(s). Spring Rate A high spring rate setting will make the springs stiffer, assisting in cornering; however, if set too high, the car is likely to jump when running over rumble strips. A lower setting will keep the car from jumping, but the vehicle will have trouble when cornering. Anti-roll Bar The anti-roll bar can be stiffened to keep the car from flipping, but this will make cornering more difficult. The setting can be lowered to accommodate cornering ability, but the car will then be easier to flip in an accident. Brakes Brake Bias Brake bias controls the percentage of braking power going toward the front and rear of the car. A setting of 50 will provide equal braking power to the front and rear of the vehicle. A setting lower than 50 will progressively favor the front of the car in braking ability; a setting higher than 50 will progressively favor the rear of the car in braking ability. In general, brake bias should be kept within the range of 40-60. Brake Strength Independent of brake bias, brake strength controls the response of the brakes relative to the amount of pressure applied to the brake button. A low setting produces little (slow) response, while a high setting produces great (fast) response. Therefore, assuming that equal pressure is always applied to the brake button, a low setting requires that braking begin earlier than the same car and corner using a high setting in the exact same racing conditions. Gearbox F1 2001 allows players to customize gear settings, but also includes three preset gear ratios: short, medium, and long. A short gear ratio provides impressive acceleration while sacrificing top-end speed. A long gear ratio provides excellent top-end speed (especially in a straight line), but far slower acceleration. A medium gear ratio provides the best of both extremes. Note that for F1's famous standing starts, a short gear ratio will allow a car to get off the line very quickly, allowing for the player to immediately gain one or more race positions. Conversely, a high gear ratio will almost certainly cause the player to lose one or more positions at the start of a race due to the slow acceleration inherent to long gear ratios. For more information on specific car parts used in tuning, please see Minesweeper's excellent Tuning Guide, available at GameFAQs (http://www.GameFAQs.com). While this guide is specifically for Gran Turismo 3 A-spec, GT3 includes many, many, many more tuning/parts options than F1 2001, and Minesweeper does a very good job explaining the function of each part. <<>> ============================================== SUGGESTED SET-UPS Here are my personal suggestions for car set-up. These are based on my own driving style, which is a bit aggressive... moreso than what F1 2001 really wants to allow, so I am always driving on the edge (moreso than the average player). Most importantly, the set-ups presented here are essentially just baselines upon which individual players can begin tinkering to find the best possible settings for their own driving styles. These set-ups were achieved using Michael Schumacher's Ferrari, always in dry and sunny conditions, using the camera mounted just above the driver's helmet. The settings were determined through extensive experimentation in Practice, then checked with Qualifying and a four-lap Race. Suggested set-up for Australia (Albert Park) Tires Type Hard Front Pressure 20.2 Rear Pressure 19.8 Aerodynamics Front Wing 15 Rear Wing 18 Suspension Front Ride Height 30 High Bump Stop 35 Low Bump Stop 30 Spring Rate 183 Anti-roll Bar 184 Rear Ride Height 42 High Bump Stop 50 Low Bump Stop 45 Spring Rate 115 Anti-roll Bar 77 Brakes Brake Bias 52 Brake Strength 65 Gearbox Long Notes: Take extreme care in braking and cornering at Turns 6-9, 15, and 16. With a TIGHT racing line, Turns 11 and 12 can be taken at full throttle if not encumbered by traffic. Suggested set-up for Malaysia (Sepang) Tires Type Hard Front Pressure 21.3 Rear Pressure 21.2 Aerodynamics Front Wing 15 Rear Wing 18 Suspension Front Ride Height 30 High Bump Stop 35 Low Bump Stop 30 Spring Rate 97 Anti-roll Bar 184 Rear Ride Height 42 High Bump Stop 50 Low Bump Stop 42 Spring Rate 108 Anti-roll Bar 77 Brakes Brake Bias 52 Brake Strength 65 Gearbox Long Notes: The long gear ratio will provide plenty of benefits along the Pit Straight and the 'back straight' behind the main grandstands, as well as on the gentle uphill climb from Turn 2 to Turn 4. Drafting techniques in these three areas will pay even further dividends in terms of overall speed. Suggested set-up for Brazil (Interlagos) Tires Type Soft Front Pressure 20.2 Rear Pressure 19.8 Aerodynamics Front Wing 15 Rear Wing 18 Suspension Front Ride Height 30 High Bump Stop 40 Low Bump Stop 35 Spring Rate 97 Anti-roll Bar 184 Rear Ride Height 56 High Bump Stop 56 Low Bump Stop 50 Spring Rate 108 Anti-roll Bar 77 Brakes Brake Bias 52 Brake Strength 65 Gearbox Long Notes: The long gear ratios can be a disadvantage in the lower portion of the circuit, but the straight- aways are so short that even those cars using medium gear ratios will not have sufficient room to come up to a respectable speed. Suggested set-up for San Marino (Imola) Tires Type Hard Front Pressure 20.0 Rear Pressure 19.8 Aerodynamics Front Wing 15 Rear Wing 18 Suspension Front Ride Height 30 High Bump Stop 30 Low Bump Stop 25 Spring Rate 87 Anti-roll Bar 184 Rear Ride Height 50 High Bump Stop 50 Low Bump Stop 45 Spring Rate 108 Anti-roll Bar 72 Brakes Brake Bias 52 Brake Strength 65 Gearbox Long Notes: Beware excessive wheelspin on acceleration out of Tosa and the Alta Chicane. Medium gear ratios should also be a viable option at Imola, but long gear ratios will help to reduce wheelspin on acceleration out of tight corners and chicanes. Suggested set-up for Spain (Catalunya) Tires Type Hard Front Pressure 19.1 Rear Pressure 19.8 Aerodynamics Front Wing 12 Rear Wing 15 Suspension Front Ride Height 40 High Bump Stop 40 Low Bump Stop 35 Spring Rate 97 Anti-roll Bar 184 Rear Ride Height 56 High Bump Stop 56 Low Bump Stop 50 Spring Rate 108 Anti-roll Bar 72 Brakes Brake Bias 52 Brake Strength 65 Gearbox Medium Notes: Long gear ratios could be used here, as there are several long sections of full-throttle racing. However, even with medium gear ratios, there are usually a few cars along the straight- aways which can be used for drafting techniques to make a pass while gaining extra speed. Suggested set-up for Austria (A1-Ring) Tires Type Hard Front Pressure 19.1 Rear Pressure 19.8 Aerodynamics Front Wing 15 Rear Wing 18 Suspension Front Ride Height 35 High Bump Stop 35 Low Bump Stop 35 Spring Rate 97 Anti-roll Bar 205 Rear Ride Height 50 High Bump Stop 50 Low Bump Stop 50 Spring Rate 108 Anti-roll Bar 82 Brakes Brake Bias 53 Brake Strength 63 Gearbox Medium Notes: With this set-up, I was P10 coming off Mobilkom Curve on the penultimate lap, and was able to draft my way along Pit Straight (passing Barichello, Hakkinen, Montoya, Ralph Schumacher, and several others) to gain P1 passing Ralph Schumacher on braking entering Remus Curve. Despite an off exiting Mobilkom Curve, I was able to win the race by 1.1 seconds. In observing the competition, I believe the CPU- controlled cars all use long gear ratios at A1-Ring, which is mostly counterproductive (except for Pit Straight and the long uphill climb to Remus Curve). This set-up is very close to the default settings given by the CPU; the only major change is to the aerodynamics. Brake bias is slightly brought forward, and brake strength slightly increased. Suggested set-up for Monaco (Monaco) Tires Type Soft Front Pressure 18.1 Rear Pressure 18.4 Aerodynamics Front Wing 19 Rear Wing 20 Suspension Front Ride Height 48 High Bump Stop 48 Low Bump Stop 40 Spring Rate 97 Anti-roll Bar 215 Rear Ride Height 69 High Bump Stop 69 Low Bump Stop 61 Spring Rate 108 Anti-roll Bar 82 Brakes Brake Bias 53 Brake Strength 65 Gearbox Long Notes: The long gear ratios seem counterproductive in theory at this venue, but the straightaways actually ARE long enough to make this practical; also, the circuit is narrow enough that defensive maneuvers can be employed to keep faster cars at bay, and drafting tactics can be used to make passes (especially in The Tunnel, although the narrowness of the circuit combined with the inherent darkness makes The Tunnel a dangerous passing zone). Suggested set-up for Canada (Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve) Tires Type Hard Front Pressure 19.1 Rear Pressure 19.8 Aerodynamics Front Wing 12 Rear Wing 14 Suspension Front Ride Height 40 High Bump Stop 40 Low Bump Stop 35 Spring Rate 97 Anti-roll Bar 194 Rear Ride Height 56 High Bump Stop 56 Low Bump Stop 50 Spring Rate 108 Anti-roll Bar 77 Brakes Brake Bias 53 Brake Strength 65 Gearbox Long Notes: Hard braking while cornering will generally cause the car to slide in the direction the steering wheel is turned. Suggested set-up for Europe (Nurburgring) Tires Type Hard Front Pressure 19.1 Rear Pressure 19.8 Aerodynamics Front Wing 12 Rear Wing 14 Suspension Front Ride Height 30 High Bump Stop 30 Low Bump Stop 25 Spring Rate 97 Anti-roll Bar 184 Rear Ride Height 40 High Bump Stop 50 Low Bump Stop 45 Spring Rate 108 Anti-roll Bar 82 Brakes Brake Bias 53 Brake Strength 65 Gearbox Long Notes: Take extreme care in the hairpin. Suggested set-up for France (Nevers Magny-Cours) Tires Type Soft Front Pressure 19.1 Rear Pressure 19.8 Aerodynamics Front Wing 12 Rear Wing 13 Suspension Front Ride Height 50 High Bump Stop 50 Low Bump Stop 45 Spring Rate 103 Anti-roll Bar 173 Rear Ride Height 61 High Bump Stop 61 Low Bump Stop 56 Spring Rate 115 Anti-roll Bar 72 Brakes Brake Bias 53 Brake Strength 63 Gearbox Long Notes: Keep a tight inside line through Turn 2 (Estoril), else risk sliding out into the sand to the left of the pavement due to centripetal force. Suggested set-up for Great Britain (Silverstone) Tires Type Soft Front Pressure 21.3 Rear Pressure 21.2 Aerodynamics Front Wing 14 Rear Wing 15 Suspension Front Ride Height 35 High Bump Stop 45 Low Bump Stop 40 Spring Rate 97 Anti-roll Bar 184 Rear Ride Height 50 High Bump Stop 61 Low Bump Stop 56 Spring Rate 108 Anti-roll Bar 77 Brakes Brake Bias 55 Brake Strength 70 Gearbox Long Notes: With the long gear ratios, it is possible to zip through Bechetts (Turns 2-5) at full throttle, with the natural lean of the car through Turn 5 causing an automatic gearbox to drop down into 6th gear to help with cornering (beginning about at the apex). Expect a difficult ride through the Stadium-like section at the end of each lap. Suggested set-up for Germany (Hockenheim) Tires Type Hard Front Pressure 20.2 Rear Pressure 21.2 Aerodynamics Front Wing 11 Rear Wing 13 Suspension Front Ride Height 40 High Bump Stop 40 Low Bump Stop 35 Spring Rate 97 Anti-roll Bar 184 Rear Ride Height 45 High Bump Stop 50 Low Bump Stop 45 Spring Rate 108 Anti-roll Bar 82 Brakes Brake Bias 54 Brake Strength 72 Gearbox Long Notes: The long gear ratios will mean slower acceleration out of Turn 1 (North Curve) and the chicanes, as well as a difficult ride through The Stadium. However, the straightaways are so long that the car should hit at least 190MPH/310KPH in most straightaways; excellent use of drafting tactics can easily pull the car to over 200MPH/320KPH, especially if there are numerous cars close enough together to all be used for drafting. On the other hand, given that the straightaways are so long, expect for other cars to also attempt to use drafting techniques; therefore, at Hockenheim moreso than at any other F1 venue, keep looking in the mirrors to defend a position if necessary. Suggested set-up for Hungary (Hungaroring) Tires Type Soft Front Pressure 20.2 Rear Pressure 19.8 Aerodynamics Front Wing 17 Rear Wing 20 Suspension Front Ride Height 40 High Bump Stop 40 Low Bump Stop 35 Spring Rate 103 Anti-roll Bar 194 Rear Ride Height 50 High Bump Stop 56 Low Bump Stop 50 Spring Rate 115 Anti-roll Bar 72 Brakes Brake Bias 52 Brake Strength 65 Gearbox Long Notes: Due to the slopes throughout, the first and last corners of the circuit must be approached with extreme care. The inherent lack of strong acceleration which comes with a long gear ratio will certainly help. Despite the long gear ratio, only in very rare circumstances will the car be able to climb into seventh gear due to the lack of significant sections of full-throttle racing. Suggested set-up for Belgium (Spa-Francorchamps) Tires Type Hard Front Pressure 20.2 Rear Pressure 21.2 Aerodynamics Front Wing 17 Rear Wing 18 Suspension Front Ride Height 40 High Bump Stop 35 Low Bump Stop 35 Spring Rate 108 Anti-roll Bar 205 Rear Ride Height 61 High Bump Stop 50 Low Bump Stop 50 Spring Rate 121 Anti-roll Bar 82 Brakes Brake Bias 53 Brake Strength 65 Gearbox Long Notes: Take care to NOT accelerate too hard/soon exiting La Source, as the car could easily spin itself into Pit Exit and result in a race-ending Black Flag. Also, beware the bumps through Eau Rouge. Suggested set-up for Italy (Monza) Tires Type Hard Front Pressure 18.1 Rear Pressure 21.2 Aerodynamics Front Wing 10 Rear Wing 13 Suspension Front Ride Height 40 High Bump Stop 40 Low Bump Stop 35 Spring Rate 97 Anti-roll Bar 194 Rear Ride Height 50 High Bump Stop 56 Low Bump Stop 50 Spring Rate 108 Anti-roll Bar 72 Brakes Brake Bias 52 Brake Strength 65 Gearbox Long Notes: Drafting tactics can be extremely beneficial along Pit Straight and Rettilineo Parabolica. The long gear ratio certainly takes advantage of the long straightaways of the Monza circuit. Suggested set-up for the United States (Indianapolis) Tires Type Hard Front Pressure 20.2 Rear Pressure 22.6 Aerodynamics Front Wing 13 Rear Wing 16 Suspension Front Ride Height 45 High Bump Stop 45 Low Bump Stop 35 Spring Rate 114 Anti-roll Bar 152 Rear Ride Height 71 High Bump Stop 54 Low Bump Stop 49 Spring Rate 128 Anti-roll Bar 82 Brakes Brake Bias 53 Brake Strength 67 Gearbox Long Notes: There is simply NO 'good' set-up for the Indianapolis F1 circuit; the infield portion requires a tight, technical set-up, while the Indy/NASCAR oval portion requires a high-speed set-up. The settings offered here reflect somewhat of a 'middle-ground' set-up, achieving only around 175MPH/280KPH on the oval portion while having a moderately difficult time cornering (especially in traffic) in the infield portion of the circuit. Drafting along the Indy/NASCAR oval portion of the circuit can bring faster lap times and higher top-end speed, which is particularly important with this suggested set-up. The long gear ratio will certainly help on the Indy/NASCAR oval, and will help to reduce excessive acceleration in the infield portion of the circuit. Suggested set-up for Japan (Suzuka) Tires Type Hard Front Pressure 19.1 Rear Pressure 21.2 Aerodynamics Front Wing 15 Rear Wing 18 Suspension Front Ride Height 45 High Bump Stop 45 Low Bump Stop 40 Spring Rate 103 Anti-roll Bar 173 Rear Ride Height 56 High Bump Stop 56 Low Bump Stop 50 Spring Rate 101 Anti-roll Bar 88 Brakes Brake Bias 52 Brake Strength 65 Gearbox Long Notes: It is best to take a TIGHT line over apex rumble strips through Chicane. Take care not to carry too much speed through the S-curves. ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF AUSTRALIA: ALBERT PARK The 2001 F1 racing season begins with a set of 'flyaway' (non-European) races. This fast, flat, attractive circuit is built around Melbourne's beautiful Albert Park Lake, using actual city streets which generally receive little traffic during the year. There are usually plenty of trees on both sides of the track, with a nice view of Melbourne's buildings as you come through Turns 12 and 13. The Albert Park circuit features many long, gentle, no-braking corners, allowing for incredible top-end speed all around this completely-flat circuit. However, these are tempered with several moderate- and hard-braking corners, as well as many dark shadows obscuring long stretches of the pavement, especially in wet conditions. Pit Straight: The front straight is fairly long, following a moderate-braking corner (Turn 16). However, Turn 1 requires an early braking zone. Turn 1: A moderate-braking right-hand corner. If you miss the braking zone here, there is a wide area in which you can recover. Traffic will often bunch up entering Turn 1, even beyond the start of a race. Turn 2: Immediately following Turn 1, this is a gentle left- hand turn which can be taken at full speed. Excellent acceleration out of Turn 1 makes the exit of Turn 2 and the ensuing straightaway a prime passing zone. Beware the barrier on the right on exiting Turn 2; do not hit the throttle too soon exiting Turn 1. Turn 3: This is a hard-braking right-hand semi-blind corner following a long straightaway; the braking zone begins earlier than it would otherwise appear, so make use of the distance-to-corner markers. Again, there is a wide recovery area here. A little speed can be made coming out of Turn 3, but the straightaway is virtually non-existent, requiring moderate braking for Turn 4. This is definitely NOT a place to pass (safely) unless you have EXCELLENT brakes and little or no tire wear. Traffic tends to bunch up here for Turns 3 and 4. Turn 4: A left-hand corner requiring at least moderate braking. To the outside of the corner is a wide, paved recovery area; however, driving too far out to the right or remaining on this paved area beyond the painted advertisement will result in a Stop-Go Penalty. The inside of Turn 4 is also a wide paved zone, but short-cutting Turn 4 by more than one car length will also result in a Stop-Go Penalty. Good acceleration out of Turn 4 can set up a good passing opportunity. Turn 5: A gentle right-hand corner through the trees which leads to a nice straightaway. With a flawless racing line, no braking is necessary here; otherwise, a quick lift of the accelerator will be needed to keep the left side of the car off the barrier. Turn 6: A semi-hidden moderate-braking right-hand corner. Traffic will sometimes bunch up here, as drivers try to spot the corner. A wide recovery zone is available here as well, but take care not to shortcut the corner. Blasting through Turn 6 without braking will almost certainly result in loss of control (with subsequent spinning, sliding, and/or crashing) due to the angle of the rumble strips. Turn 7: Immediately following Turn 6, Turn 7 is a very gentle left-hand corner which brings you alongside the northernmost end of Albert Park Lake. Beware the barrier on the right. Turn 8: This is almost not a turn at all, as it curves extremely gently along the shoreline, but the course map on the race's official Web site lists this as a corner. Turn 9: This corner is a tight right-hand turn which requires moderate or hard braking. Traffic almost always bunches up here. If you miss the braking zone here, you will end up out in the blue-green dust-covered area. Turn 10: This is almost not a turn at all, as it curves extremely gently to the left and back along the shoreline. There is absolutely NO room for error on the right side of the track, as the pavement runs directly up against the barrier. Once you pass underneath the second pedestrian bridge and see the grandstands ahead on the right, drift to the right to set up the best racing line for Turns 11 and 12. Turns 11 and 12: If you are not navigating traffic, Turns 11 and 12 can be taken at full speed, although some drivers may feel more comfortable with tapping the brakes once in each turn. However, sliding even one pixel across the rumble strips on either side of the chicane results in a Stop-Go Penalty. It is very easy to slide off the pavement exiting this chicane if taken at top speed, so a flawless racing line is crucial. Straightaway: The pavement runs directly up against the barrier on the left side of the course here, creating problems for cars on the left whose engines suddenly expire. Turn 13: This is a semi-blind right-hand corner requiring moderate braking if you are alone; traffic tends to bunch up here. The recovery area again is quite wide, with a long run-off strip if needed. This leads to a short straightaway which can be a prime passing zone if acceleration out of Turn 13 is strong. Note that if you were able to take Turns 11 and 12 without braking or navigating traffic, you can reach over 210MPH just before entering Turn 13, making braking even more important. Turn 14: A light-braking, right-hand corner with a wide recovery area. Experts should be able to take this corner at top speed (if not in traffic) with a flawless racing line, or by dropping the right-side tires onto the grass. This is a good place to pass on braking upon entering the corner. Turn 15: Do not be fooled by the run-off lane which proceeds directly ahead into an unmoving barrier; there IS a J-turn to the left here, requiring hard braking. This is also a good place to pass on braking when entering the corner. Note that the Pit Entry is immediately to the right upon exiting the corner, so be sure to look for cars moving slower than expected as they enter Pit Lane. Turn 16: But, be careful with the approach and exit angles for this right-hand turn, as the barrier (and a grandstand) is just a few feet off the pavement on the left as you exit the corner. A new addition from previous versions of the game, the Pit Lane barrier begins at the entry of Turn 16, so shortcutting is not a possibility, and dropping the right- side tires off the pavement is also not a good option. This leads onto the Pit Straight. Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins to the right immediately after Turn 15. It is possible to enter at a fairly high speed, but there will be a sharp turn to the right very quickly, requiring moderate or heavy braking. Before entering the main Pit area, however, is a tight right-left chicane, so be prepared to truly slam on the brakes, or else the nose of your car will slam into the Pit Lane barrier. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF MALAYSIA: KUALA LAMPUR This is the second-newest F1 course currently in use, as its construction was completed just in time for the end of the 1999 F1 season. Kuala Lampur includes very wide recovery zones all along the course, on both sides of the pavement, with very few exceptions. The main grandstands are nestled 'within' the course itself, as the 'back straight' and the 'Pit Straight' flank each side of the main spectator seats, linked by a tight left-hand hairpin. While the pavement is rather wide for an F1 circuit, it is actually more difficult to drive than it appears on television, especially the 'back' part of the course (behind the main grandstands). Pit Straight: The main grandstands are to the left as you fly down the Pit Straight. Slam on the brakes at the end of the Pit Straight, as the first two corners are VERY tight. Turns 1 and 2: Turn 1 is a TIGHT right-hand corner, followed immediately by the not-as-tight-but-still-difficult left-hand Turn 2. If there is traffic ahead of you, the cars will certainly bunch up here. The first corner on the opening lap of any F1 race is characterized by cars bunching up together; given the downhill slope of Turns 1 (beginning at the exit) and 2, cars are even more likely than usual to bump each other and/or the barrier here. Fortunately, the outside of Turn 2 has a wide (sand-filled) recovery area, so if a major accident takes place, it might be wise to (carefully) take to the sand to avoid the worst of the chaos and debris. Remember that Turn 2 is slower than Turn 1, so if following another car, allow plenty of room to keep from ramming the other vehicle. Turn 3: Accelerate hard through this sweeping right-hand corner. No braking is necessary here. The course begins a gentle uphill climb here. Turn 4: It is easy to overrun this corner, either on entry or on exit, but the wide patch of sand is available to slow you down in these situations. This right-hand corner is the crest of the uphill climb which began in Turn 3. Moderate braking will be required here. Turns 5 and 6: Turn 5 is an easy left-hand corner, followed by the similarly-shaped right-hand Turn 6. In Turn 5, the barrier comes very close to the pavement on the inside of the corner, so be careful not to roll up on the grass here. There is plenty of space for recovery on the outside of each corner, which may be important exiting Turn 6 as it is rather easy to run too wide on exit. Both corners can be taken either flat-out or with simply a slight lifting of the accelerator. Turns 7 and 8: These two right-hand corners are best taken in a wide 'U' formation. There is plenty of kitty litter on the outside of the corners here should you lose concentration and drive off the pavement. While experts with a death wish may be able to speed through these corners at full throttle, braking or significantly lifting off the accelerator would be a far better choice. Turn 9: This tight left-hand J-turn is made even more difficult by the brief uphill slope leading to the corner itself, which hides the view of the pavement as the course turns to the left here. Early braking is key, or else you WILL be caught out in the sand trap. Moderate or heavy braking will be needed here, depending on your top speed coming out of the 'U' formation of Turns 7 and 8. If you have excellent confidence in your braking ability (especially with fresh tires after a pit stop), this is a great place to pass other cars on braking, but only if attempted near the inside of the corner - otherwise, you will be far off the racing line, and any car(s) you try to pass will force you out into the sand. Turn 10: After the tightness of Turn 9, Turn 10's right-hand corner can be taken at full throttle. The course climbs gently uphill here, cresting shortly after the exit. Turn 11: The course begins a gentle downhill slope near the entry of Turn 11, then turns to the right as the downhill slope continues. Moderate braking will be needed here, as Turn 11 is tighter than Turn 10. This is also a good place to pass other cars on braking. It is also easy to overrun the corner, so there is plenty of sand to the outside of the corner to slow you down in this instance. Turn 12: After a short straightaway, the course turns to the left. If you hug the apex tightly, you should be able to take Turn 12 without braking. Again, plenty of sand awaits those who slide off the pavement here. Turn 13: This is a nasty right-hand decreasing-radius hairpin with no paved swing-out area on exit, making the corner far more difficult than it at first appears. The first 60 degrees can be taken at top speed, although some braking is greatly recommended here. After that, moderate or heavy braking is required to keep from rolling out into the kitty litter. Strong acceleration is key on exit. Straightaway: This straightaway runs along the 'back side' of the main grandstands. This is a very long straightaway, so powerful acceleration out of the Turn 13 hairpin can provide good passing opportunities here, especially for those using a low-downforce set-up. Near the end of the straightaway, a line of pavement leaves to the right, but this is NOT the Pit Lane entry used for F1 races. Turn 14: This is the final corner of the course, and certainly the most important in a close race. Following the long straightaway on the 'back side' of the main grandstands, this is a left-hand hairpin, much tighter than Turn 13. It is key here to approach from the extreme right side of the pavement, tightly hug the apex, and accelerate strongly while drifting back out to the right on exit. The Pit Lane entry begins here about halfway through the hairpin, so beware of slower cars going in for servicing. This is also a good place to pass on braking, but be ready to block any aggressive drivers trying to pass you as they slam on the throttle on exit. Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins halfway through the Turn 14 hairpin (the final corner of the course). Keep tight to the right entering the hairpin, to allow those passing you to dive to the left-hand apex of the corner; after the first 90 degrees of the corner, drive straight ahead along the Pit Lane. However, you will quickly find the Pit Lane curving to the left, so make sure you have slowed enough to not bang the front wing or front-right tire against the barrier. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF BRAZIL: INTERLAGOS Most F1 courses are driven clockwise; built on a steep hillside, Interlagos is driven counter-clockwise, which I understand causes 'undue' fatigue to drivers' necks as the race progresses. The upper part of the course features two extensive segments of flat-out, full-throttle, top-speed driving. However, the lower part of the course (where the most clock time is spent per lap) features tight corners and several significant elevation changes. However, despite these two very different sections of the circuit, the car set-up is not quite as key here as at Indianapolis. Pit Straight: This is the highest point of the course in terms of elevation. There is no room to pull off the course here if there is a problem with a car, as the barriers rub against the pavement on both sides of the track. This is also the fastest portion of the course, leading into the most dangerous set of corners in all of F1 racing. There are several left-hand fades along the 'Pit Straight.' This 'straightaway' is the longest stretch of flat-out acceleration of this course. The optimal racing line is hard to the left, so be careful not to rub the left-side tires against the barriers, especially when passing the Pit Lane Entry. The Pit Entrance is also to the left; beware of slow cars entering Pit Lane. Turn 1 (S do Senna): Especially since this corner follows an incredibly long and fast 'Pit Straight,' this is by far the most dangerous turn on the course, and thus perhaps the most dangerous corner in all of F1 racing. This is a tight, left- hand, semi-blind, downhill corner requiring severe braking long before reaching the turn. Unless you have PERFECT confidence in your car's braking AND turning ability, this is definitely NOT a place to pass!!! For those who overrun the corner, there is a continent-size patch of kitty litter. Turn 2 (S do Senna): Following immediately after Turn 1, it is best to coast through this right-hand corner, with strong acceleration on exit to set up prime passing opportunities in Curva du Sol or along the following straightaway. Beware the Pit lane barrier practically rubbing up against the pavement here on the left. (Historical note: The Pit Lane used to rejoin the main course at the exit of Turn 2, but FIA and the drivers deemed that this was too dangerous.) Turn 3 (Curva du Sol): Immediately following S do Senna, Turn 3 is a gentle left-hand corner which can also be taken at top speed. Just beyond the exit of Turn 3, the Pit Lane rejoins the main course on the left. Curva du Sol leads into the second-longest straightaway of the circuit. Straightaway: This long straightaway presents a gentle downhill slope leading to the lower portion of the course. Keep to the right on exiting Curva du Sol so that cars rejoining the race from the Pit Lane can blend in without incident. Turn 4 (Lago): This corner truly begins the lower portion of the course in terms of elevation. Lago is a semi-hidden left-hand corner with a slight downward slope. Moderate braking is necessary here to keep from sliding the car into the recovery zone, especially if the track is wet. Good acceleration out of Lago sets up great passing in the next corner and along the following straightaway. Do not overrun the course, or you will be slowed severely by the sand and grass. Turn 5: A gentle left-hand turn, this can be taken at full throttle. The course begins to slope upward again. However, do not try to take this corner to sharply on the apex, as the barrier may not agree with your tactics. Straightaway: This is effectively the last straightaway before the Pit Straight at the beginning of the course. The course here slopes upward, so cars with excellent acceleration out of Turns 4 and 5 can pass those with poor uphill speed. Turn 6 (Laranjinha): This is the beginning of a pair of right-hand corners which effectively form a 'U' shape. The entry of this corner can be taken at full throttle, but be ready to touch the brakes at the exit of this corner. Turn 6 is also on the crown of a hill. Turn 7 (Laranjinha): The final corner of a 'U' shape in the course, this is a right-hand decreasing-radius corner with a gentle downward slope. Turn 8 (Curva do S): After an almost negligible straightaway, this incredibly tight right-hand corner requires hard braking. The course also begins to slope downhill at the beginning of Turn 8. Pinheirinho immediately follows. Turn 9 (Pinheirinho): Immediately upon exiting Turn 8, slam on the brakes again (or simply coast) for the sharp left-hand Pinheirinho. This may potentially a good place to pass other cars. Turn 9 is a long corner, however, so it is important to hug the apex much longer than usual. Extreme caution must be taken here if racing in wet conditions, or you will find yourself sliding into the sand. The exit of Pinheirinho leads to an upward-sloping straightaway. Turn 10 (Bica do Pato): The entrance of Turn 10 begins the final downward slope of the course, making this right-hand corner even more difficult to navigate. Heavy braking and excellent hands are required to maneuver the car safely through this corner, especially in the rain. Good acceleration is needed exiting Bica do Pato to pass traffic in the next corner and ensuing straightaway. The kitty litter is available if you overshoot the corner, but then you will quickly find yourself rubbing against a barrier. Turn 11 (Mergulho): This left-hand corner almost immediately follows Bica do Pato and can be taken almost flat-out to provide good speed along the next (very short) straightaway. Good acceleration out of Bica do Pato makes this a good passing zone if you have a decent racing line, otherwise you may find yourself off the course on the outside of the corner. Turn 12 (Juncao): This is a tight left-hand corner requiring moderate to heavy braking. The final, steep uphill slope begins here, and the exit of the corner is hidden (even in chase view). It is extremely easy to run off the outside of the corner here, but a small patch of grass and another paved lane provide some run-off relief here. This corner leads to the incredibly long Pit Straight. Pit Entry: As you climb the long 'Pit Straight,' the Pit Lane begins on the left. Pit Exit: The Pit Lane once emptied onto the exit of Turn 2; it now rejoins the main course just after the exit of Curva du Sol. This makes Pit Lane extremely long, which makes it extremely important to select your pit strategy carefully in long races. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF SAN MARINO: IMOLA The Imola circuit is challenging but rather fun. Again, this is a 'counterclockwise' circuit, but, oddly, the Pits and Paddock are located on the outside of the circuit and not on the inside. There is extremely little tolerance for shortcutting the chicanes. Due to the slope of the grass on the inside of the corner, Turn 6 (Tosa) is essentially a blind corner unless traffic is present to mark the course for you. Pit Straight: This is a long straightaway, which enables high speeds as the cars cross the Start/Finish Line. Good exit speed out of the final chicane makes for prime passing and a good show for the spectators. The Pit Straight fades to the left at the exit of Pit Lane (which is aligned with the Start/Finish Line). Once past the Pits, there is a barrier directly against the right side of the track. Turns 1 and 2 (Tamburello): This is a left-right chicane. Turn 1 requires moderate braking, but if you slow enough in Turn 1, you should be able to drive at full throttle through Turn 2 and beyond. If you try to take the entire chicane at full speed, you can make it through Turn 1 fairly well, but you will quickly find yourself in the grass on the outside of Turn 2 and banging against the nearby barrier. If you completely miss the braking zone for Turn 1, there is a huge sand trap to help you recover. Turn 3 (Tamburello): Immediately following Turn 2, Turn 3 is a soft left-hand corner which can be taken at full speed. Strong acceleration out of Turn 1 makes this a good passing zone. Following this corner is a significant straightaway. Turns 4 and 5 (Villeneuve): This is another left-right chicane, but not as lengthy as the first. Care must be taken not to slide off the course at the exit of Turn 5. It is possible for experts to fly through this chicane at top speed (if not encumbered by traffic) by rolling up on the rumble strips, but doing so produces a significant chance of losing control of the car. The course slopes upward at the exit of this chicane. Turn 6 (Tosa): This is a semi-blind left-hand corner which continues the upward slope of the course. Moderate or even severe braking is required here, or else your car will be in the kitty litter and headed toward the spectators. Traffic is actually a benefit in approaching this corner, as the course is largely hidden from view given the slope of the grass on the inside of the corner, but other cars are easy to see. Straightaway: The course continues up the hill here. Just beyond the overhead billboard, the track fades to the right as it begins its gentle downward slope, but then leads directly into Piratella. Turn 7 (Piratella): The course continues downward here, with the slope increasing. This is a left-hand semi-blind corner. It is rather easy to slip off the pavement here and into the kitty litter on the outside of the corner. Any passing here is best made tight to the apex of the corner, perhaps with only the right-side wheels on the pavement or rumble strip. Turn 8: Barely a corner at all but more than a fade, the course gently turns to the left here. This is a full-speed 'corner,' but the racing line is still very important here. Turns 9 and 10 (Mineralli): This is a pair of right-hand corners which effectively function as a decreasing-radius 'U' formation and are best taken in this manner. Turn 9 can be taken at full speed, but upon exit to the outside of Turn 9, severe braking is needed and extra steering to the right is required to safely navigate around the decreasing-radius Turn 10. The track begins another (steep) uphill slope in Turn 10. Tightly hugging the apex allows for prime passing through Turn 10. Care must be taken not to enter Turn 10 too fast, or else you will be off the course on the left. Turn 11 (Mineralli): Immediately following Turn 10, the left- hand Turn 11 continues the upward slope of the course. Care must be taken not to slip off to the right of the track on exit. Turns 12-13 (Alta Chicane): This is a tight right-left chicane. Other cars generally slow significantly for this chicane, so a full-speed maneuver here in traffic is not advised. In fact, attempting to take this chicane at top speed will require rolling up on the rumble strips, and you will likely lose control and either spin or collide with the all-too-close barrier to the right side of the course. The barrier to the outside of Turn 13 is very close to the track, so be careful not to slip off the course. Straightaway: The course begins its final downhill slope here, fading gently first to the left, then to the right. Turns 14 and 15 (Rivazza): This is a left-hand 'U' formation. Moderate braking is required entering Turn 14, but then Turn 15 can be taken at full speed (IF you slowed enough in Turn 14), although some may feel more comfortable lightly tapping the brakes here. Caution must be taken to use enough braking entering the 'U' formation, or else you will end up in the sand on the right side of the track. Straightaway: This is the final long straightaway before reaching the Pit Straight. However, the official course fades to the right just after passing underneath the Helix banner; driving straight ahead (the pavement of the old course) and thus missing the entire final chicane results in a Stop-Go Penalty. The end of this straightaway provides two options: 1.) Keep driving straight ahead onto Pit Lane; 2.) Turn left for the final chicane. Turns 16 and 17 (Bassa Chicane): This is the final chicane (left-right) of the course. To the outside of Turn 16 is the Pit Lane entry, so be mindful of slower cars entering Pit Lane as you approach the chicane. Moderate braking is required entering Turn 16, but then Turn 17 requires light braking. Pit Entry: Instead of turning left for Turn 16, keep driving directly ahead. However, there is no room for slowing once you leave the main course, so stay tight to the right side of the pavement as you slow to enter Pit Lane. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF SPAIN: CATALUNYA The Catalunya circuit is challenging, especially the two hairpins and the final corners of the race. For observers and drivers alike, plenty of action can be found at the Spanish Grand Prix. Intertextal Note: The Catalunya circuit is also used in the recent PS2 game Le Mans 24 Hours. Pit Straight: As usual, incredible speeds can be attained here. Watch for cars rejoining the race from the right side of the straightaway about two-thirds of the way along its length. Turn 1 (Elf): This is a right-hand corner which requires moderate braking. Be careful not to hug the inside of the corner too tightly, or you will damage your right-side tires on the barrier. Strong acceleration out of Turn 1 creates great passing opportunities all the way to Repsol. Attempting to take Turn 1 at top speed will either cause you to lose control as you run up on the rumble strips, or send you too far off course to survive Turn 2 intact. Turn 2 (Elf): Immediately following Turn 1, the left-hand Turn 2 can usually be taken at top acceleration. With strong acceleration out of Turn 1, this is a prime passing zone. Turn 3 (Seat): A sweeping right-hand increasing-radius corner which can be taken at full speed with a flawless racing line. This is also a good place to pass slower cars, especially if you have the inside line. Turn 4 (Repsol): This is a semi-blind right-hand hairpin corner which requires moderate or heavy braking. The barrier on the inside of the corner rests almost directly against the track, and blocks your view around the corner. This can actually be a good place to pass on braking, but only with extreme caution (and usually only if the car you wish to pass takes the wide line around the corner). Don't come too hot into this corner or else you will find yourself in the sand. After clearing the first 90 degrees, you should be able to accelerate fairly well if not encumbered by traffic. Turn 5: After a very short straightaway, this is a semi-blind left-hand hairpin, a bit tighter than Turn 4. Moderate or heavy braking will be needed here, or you will definitely find yourself in the kitty litter. Straightaway: This straightaway fades to the left. Strong acceleration out of Turn 5 can create passing opportunities, especially in the braking zone for Wuth. Turn 6 (Wuth): With a good racing line, you should be able to brake lightly to clear this semi-blind, slightly-downhill, left-hand corner. Beware the barrier on the inside of Wuth. The exit of Wuth has an immediate fade to the right, so do not commit too much to turning left here, or the front-left of the car will be shaking hands with the barrier. Turn 7 (Campsa): This right-hand corner can be taken at full speed with a flawless racing line. Note that the official circuit is to the right; do not drive directly ahead onto another patch of pavement, or you will be assigned a Stop-Go Penalty. Turn 8 (La Cacsa): Severe braking is required for this left- hand corner. While not suggested, you may be able to pass other cars on braking here. As with Wuth, stay off the rumble strips and grass on the inside of the turn, or you will risk losing control of the car. This is a 'J' turn, and the corner seems to go on forever before you reach the exit. Turn 9 (Banc Sabadeau): Shortly following Turn 8, moderate or heavy braking will be needed here for the right-hand, upward- sloping corner. This is also a 'J' turn which is nearly a double-apex corner. If you need a recovery area anywhere on the course, it will most likely be here. It is possible to pass slower cars here by tightly hugging the inside of the turn, even running the right-side tires on the rumble strips or just slightly in the grass. Turn 10: Light braking may be needed for this right-hand corner. The key here is to truly hug the inside of the turn and accelerate strongly through the exit. Watch for slow cars here preparing to go to Pit Lane for servicing. Turn 11: Entering this right-hand corner, the Pit Lane begins on the right, so be on the lookout for very slow cars here. If you take this final corner too tightly, or make a VERY late decision to go to the pits, you will certainly damage the front of the car on a barrier. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF AUSTRIA: A1-RING This course may only have seven corners, the fewest of the circuits used in the 2001 racing season, but it is still a highly-challenging technical course for the drivers. The circuit itself is built on a steep hillside, with the Paddock area and the Pit Straight located at the lowest elevation of the course. The significant elevation changes and poorly- placed barriers make this a particularly challenging circuit to safely navigate for 90+ minutes. Pit Straight: Long and straight; main grandstands to the left, Pit Lane to the right. Rather mundane, except that the entire Pit Straight has a slow uphill climb into the Castrol Curve. The beginning of the Pit Straight (coming off Mobilkom Curve) is also a bit bumpy. Turn 1 (Castrol Curve): After a rather mundane Pit Straight, the Castrol Curve is anything but mundane. This is a right- hand uphill corner which requires moderate braking. The Pit Lane rejoins the main course on the right at the exit of the corner. Because of the steep slope of the hill, it is all too easy to drive off the outside of the corner and into the massive sand trap. If you lose your concentration and forget even to slow down, you will likely find yourself airborne once you hit the rumble strip; similarly, if you try to take this corner at top speed, you may find yourself looking up at the ground. Straightaway: There are a few fades in the straightaway as the course continues its uphill climb. The end of the straightaway (approaching Remus Curve) has a suddenly steeper grade and demands total concentration. Turn 2 (Remus Curve): This is a TIGHT right-hand 'J' turn requiring heavy or even severe braking, and complete concentration to navigate safely (even when not dealing with traffic). The uphill climb of the circuit continues through most of the turn, making high or even moderate speeds impossible here. Rolling the right-side tires up on the thin patch of grass on the inside of the Remus Curve will almost definitely result in loss of control of your vehicle. Even worse, this is a blind corner due to the barrier. Aggressive drivers will certainly end up overrunning the Remus Curve on exit and find themselves beached in the kitty litter. If you use the accelerator too soon on exit, you WILL find yourself off-course. Straightaway: Located at the highest elevation of the course, this straightaway has a fade to the right, then another to the left. After the second fade, prepare for braking before arriving at the Gosser Curve. Make use of the distance-to- corner markers, or else you risk overrunning Gosser Curve. Turn 3 (Gosser Curve): Another tight right-hand corner, heavy braking will be required here to avoid sliding off the course and into yet another sand trap. This is also a blind corner, due to the barrier on the inside of Gosser. The circuit begins to slowly descend in elevation here. Straightaway: This is actually NOT a straightaway at all; the course map does not list the right-hand turn, but it is definitely more than just a fade. If you overrun this, you will end up in the same sand trap as before - it is simply extended along the left side of the course from the outside of Gosser until well beyond this unofficial corner. Turn 4 (Niki Lauda Curve): This is a wide left-hand corner which will require moderate or heavy braking, especially since this is a blind corner due to the slope of the hill on the inside of the turn; even if you slow greatly before entering the corner, you will likely be tapping the brakes as you progress through Niki Lauda. There is another wide patch of sand on the outside of the corner, stretching almost all the way to the entrance of the Gerhard Berger Curve. A short straightaway separates Turns 4 and 5. Note that the circuit turns to the left here; the patch of pavement which continues straight forward will lead you into a barrier. Turn 5 (Gerhard Berger Curve): This is almost identical to the Niki Lauda Curve, but with an additional sand trap which begins on the inside of the corner. Straightaway: Again more than a fade but not listed as an official corner, there is a 'turn' to the right shortly after exiting the Gerhard Berger Curve. About two-thirds of the way along, the course enters a scenic forested area; this 'transition' section is also rather bumpy. Turn 6 (Jochen Rindt Curve): This is a blind right-hand corner which can be taken with light braking, or just a small lift of the accelerator; the best way to judge this corner is by using the right-side barrier as a guide. Another sand trap awaits those who run off the outside of the corner. A short straightaway follows Jochen Rindt. Turn 7 (Mobilkom Curve): This is a right-hand corner which will require light or moderate braking. The Pit Lane begins on the right just before the entry to Mobilkom, so be careful not to bump cars slowing before going to the pits. Pit Entry: Located just before the entrance to the Mobilkom Curve, the Pit Lane is to the right. This is a very long pit lane, so plan to stay out of here as much as possible!!! ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF MONACO: MONTE CARLO (TEMPORARY STREET CIRCUIT) 'To finish first, first you must finish.' The Monaco circuit is a highly daunting temporary street course, especially from the Driver View, as the barriers are FAR too close for comfort, and passing is virtually impossible for even expert drivers. If there is a problem with a car, there are extremely few places to safely pull aside, so all drivers must be constantly wary of damaged vehicles, especially slow or stationary cars around the many blind corners. The most significant key to simply finishing a race at Monaco is SURVIVAL, which means a slow, methodical, patient race. Aggressive drivers (like myself) would almost certainly end up dead - or at least driving an extremely beat-up vehicle - driving the Monaco circuit for real!!! For a comparison, the Surfer's Paradise circuit in Newman-Haas Racing is a sweet dream compared to the Monaco circuit!!!!! The circuit is extremely narrow, to the point that if a car bangs a barrier, it will almost certainly ricochet into the opposite barrier (if not into a nearby vehicle). While driving this circuit, players may want to have "I Will Survive" playing on auto- repeat!!! Pit Straight: Not straight at all, the 'Pit Straight' fades to the right along its entire length. Near the end, the Pit Lane rejoins the main course from the right. Turn 1 (Sainte Devote): This is a tight right-hand semi-blind corner; heavy braking is required long before reaching Sainte Devote. To the left on entering this corner is one of the few areas to pull off the course if there is a problem. Overshooting the corner results in smashing the front wing against the unmoving barrier. The uphill portion of the course begins here. Straightaway (Beau Rivage): Not really straight with its multi-direction fades, the circuit climbs steeply uphill here. Because of the fades, this is actually NOT a passing zone; you may think you have enough room to pass a slower car and actually pull up alongside it, but then you and the slower vehicle will end up bumping each other and/or a barrier because of a fade. Three-wide racing is definitely NOT an option here!!!!! Turn 2 (Massanet): This is a sweeping decreasing-radius left- hand blind corner requiring moderate or heavy braking on entry and light braking (or coasting) as you continue through the turn. If you come in too fast, the corner workers will be scraping the right side of your car off the barrier at the end of the race; if you take the corner too tightly, the same will happen for the left side of the car. The exit of Massanet is the highest elevation of the circuitä which has only just begun, even if it IS 'all downhill' from here!!! Turn 3 (Casino): Moderate braking will be needed for the right-hand Casino. This corner almost immediately follows Massanet, and begins the long downward trajectory of the course. This corner is actually wider than most, to the extent that a car in trouble may be parked along the barrier on the outside of the corner. Be careful not to scrape the left-side barrier while exiting Turn 3; similarly, do not overcompensate and scrape the right-side barrier at the apex of Casino. Turn 4 (Mirabeau): Following a medium-length downhill straightaway, heavy braking is needed for this right-hand blind 'J' turn. If you miss the braking zone, your front end will be crushed up against yet another barrier. This corner continues the course's downhill slope, which adds to the difficulty of the turn. Turn 5 (Great Curve): Following an extremely short straightaway, this left-hand hairpin is one of the slowest in all of F1 racing (even 40MPH is a dangerous speed here). If you have excellent braking ability, you can actually PASS (a rarity!!!) by taking the tight inside line; otherwise, it would be best to drive through the Great Curve single-file. If there is traffic ahead, it may simply be best to fall in line, as two-wide cornering here is extremely difficult to do without damaging the car. Turns 6 and 7 (Portier): This pair of right-hand corners form a 'U' shape, but neither can be taken at any respectable speed. Between these two corners is a pull-off area on the left, with another to the left on exiting the 'U' formation. Turn 7 is the slowest of the two corners, and is the most difficult in terms of the almost-nonexistent view of the track. Accelerating too soon out of Turn 7 means banging the left side of the car against yet another immovable barrier. Do not let the beautiful view of the water distract you from the race. The circuit is a little bumpy exiting Portier, especially if you stay tight to the inside of the corner on exit. Straightaway (The Tunnel): This 'straightaway' is actually a very long right-hand fade in a semi-tunnel (the left side provides a view of the water). However, even on a sunny day, visibility here is poor due to the sun being at a 'wrong' angle compared to the circuit, and this is made even worse should you be following a car with a malfunctioning or expired engine. Start braking shortly after entering back into the sunlight (assuming Dry Weather is active) for the chicane. Chicane (Nouveau Chicane): The course narrows as you come around the chicane, but then 'widens' back to 'normal' at the exit. Fortunately, F1 2001 has removed the barrier on the inside of the chicane which made this a treacherous configuration in F1 2000. Turn 8 (Tobacco): This left-hand corner is best taken with moderate braking. Turns 9-12 (Swimming Pool): This is essentially a double chicane around the swimming pool in the classic 'bus stop' configuration. Turns 9 and 10 form a tight left-right combination, for which moderate braking is required, although little or no braking can be used if you roll straight over the rumble strips with a solid racing line and no encumbering traffic. After an extremely brief straightaway, Turns 11 and 12 form the opposite configuration (right-left), but are even tighter and require moderate braking at best. This opens out onto a short straightaway where you MIGHT be able to pass ONE car. Turns 13 and 14 (La Rascasse): This is a tight left-right chicane requiring moderate braking for Turn 13 and heavy braking for Turn 14. Even worse, Turn 14 is a 'J' turn, so the racing line is also very important here. The Pit Lane is to the right at the exit of this chicane. Turns 15 and 16 (Anthony Hoges): A tight right-left chicane, these are the final corners of the Monaco circuit. The course narrows here through the chicane, then 'widens' to 'normal' for the Pit Straight. Pit Entry: The entrance to the Pit Lane is to the right immediately after clearing La Rascasse. Given that La Rascasse is a blind corner, on every lap, expect a slower car here headed for the pits. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF CANADA: CIRCUIT GILLES VILLENEUVE This incredible circuit is built on an island, accessible to spectators only via subway. Much of the course runs along the southern and northern shores of the island. This course is also unusual in that the paddock area is to the outside of the course (as at Imola), along the northern shore of the island. The long, sweeping straightaways provide for excellent top-end speed - a much-welcome change from the slow, tight corners and the many unforgiving barriers of the streets of Monaco (the previous race circuit in Championship Mode) - but there are several tight corners here to challenge both drivers and cars. Mind the Casino Hairpin (Turn 10), the westernmost corner of the course. Also tricky is the Senna Curve, as it immediately follows the first corner of the race. Pit Straight: This follows the final chicane of the circuit. As the Pit Lane rejoins the main course from the left, the Pit Straight fades to the right, setting up Turn 1. If you were successful in flying through the final chicane at top speed without needing to navigate traffic, you will likely be pushing 200MPH at the Start/Finish Line. Turn 1: This left-hand corner will require moderate braking, and immediately flows into the Senna Curve. There is a patch of extra pavement on the right before entering Turn 1, but it is set too far back to be useful in attempting to gain a better racing line. Turn 2 (Senna Curve): This is a right-hand hairpin corner requiring heavy or severe braking. It is very easy to run too wide here, slipping off into the grass. Likewise, it is rather easy to overcompensate and cut the corner, which can cause the car to spin if taken too fast. Extreme caution is required here if racing in wet conditions, as the severity of the hairpin can itself cause the car to slide. Perhaps the best tactic is to enter Turn 1 from the extreme right of the pavement, and brake smoothly all the way through to just beyond the apex of Senna Curve before accelerating again. Beware the barrier to the left on exit. A moderate straightaway follows the Senna Curve, so acceleration from the exit is important. Turns 3 and 4: This right-left chicane can provide a good passing zone. Turn 3 is tight and semi-blind, but passing on braking is an option for those who know the chicane well. Turn 4 is an easier corner, allowing good acceleration on exit, but it is still easy to overshoot the exit of the chicane and bang the right side of the car against the nearby barrier. Expert drivers MIGHT be able to blast through this chicane at full acceleration by making judicious use of the rumble strips. This chicane begins the segment of the circuit closely bounded by barriers. Turn 5: This sweeping right-hand corner can be taken at full speed, unless you are coping with traffic. Be careful not to hug the apex too tightly, or your right-side tires will be on the grass here. Turn 6: Finally coming out of the section of Monacoesquely- close barriers, this left-hand corner will require moderate braking, or you will be flying through the grass toward the spectators in Grandstand 33. This leads out to a very brief straightaway. Turn 7: Following a very short straightaway, Turn 7 is a light-braking right-hand corner. On the outside of Turn 7 is a short, steep hillside with a barrier, so DO NOT run wide entering the corner, as it is possible to send the vehicle airborne!!! It is easy to run wide on exit and slip off the course and into the barrier on the left, so be careful. Straightaway: The course runs along the southern shore of the island here. Unfortunately, the extremely tall barrier prevents much of a view, which actually forces your eyes to be transfixed on the road and any other cars ahead. Once you pass underneath the pedestrian bridge, begin braking for the upcoming chicane. Turns 8 and 9: This right-left chicane is similar to Turns 6 and 7 in that overrunning the chicane leaves you driving through the sand directly toward another grandstand full of spectators. Moderate braking will be needed to safely enter the chicane's tight right-hand corner. The second corner of the chicane is a gentler left-hand turn, but you might still run off the pavement on exit and grind the right side of the car against the barrier, or roll up on the rumble strips on the inside of the corner and lose control of the car. Accelerate strongly out of the chicane to set up passing possibilities along the following straightaway and into Casino Hairpin. Straightaway: About two-thirds of the way along, the course fades to the left. Begin braking early for Casino Hairpin unless you really want to beach the car in the kitty litter; to begin braking after passing underneath the second pedestrian bridge is almost certainly too late for this braking zone. Turn 10 (Casino Hairpin): This is a tight right-hand hairpin requiring heavy or even severe braking, depending on when you begin braking for the corner. Somehow, this corner seems to be longer than it really is, so be judicious with the accelerator until you see clear, straight track ahead. Straightaway: On exiting Turn 10, the course fades to the right, then back to the left. However, no braking is required here. Turn 11: Officially marked on course maps as a corner, the course actually only fades to the right here, thus no braking is required. You should be fairly high up in the gearbox by the time you reach Turn 11. Straightaway (Casino Straight): The Casino Straight (named for the casino in the middle of the island) runs parallel to the northern shore of the island on which the course is built; there is not much of a view to the left, but it is not very interesting anyhow (especially when compared to Albert Park Lake in Melbourne). This is by far the longest straightaway of the entire course, so much of the time spent here will be in your car's top gear, quite likely achieving speeds over 200MPH. The Casino Straight leads to the final (right-left) chicane of the course, as well as the entry for Pit Lane. if you can spot it through the trees, the Casino de Montreal is the grayish complex off the course to the right as you drive between the final two pedestrian bridges. Turns 12 and 13: This is a right-left chicane which can be cleared (without traffic) with light or moderate braking. For experts, this chicane can be taken at full speed and no braking, but only with a flawless racing line and a perfect knowledge of the corners. The exit of Turn 13 has a wide odd-colored lane of concrete to allow for some swing-out; nonetheless, be careful not to bump the barrier. The exit of the chicane flows onto the Pit Straight. The Pit Lane entry runs straight ahead in line with the Casino Straight, so cars slowing on the left are likely heading in for servicing, and may block your optimal racing line if you are continuing on- course. Pit Entry: As you enter the final (right-left) chicane, the Pit Entry runs straight ahead. Once clear of the main course, there is very little room for deceleration before the Pit Lane's own tight right-left chicane, so it is very important to slow down on Casino Straight before reaching the Pit Entry. Keep as far to the left as possible when slowing on Casino Straight, allowing other cars to keep to the right as they prepare for the final chicane. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF EUROPE: NURBURGRING From a driving standpoint, the hilly Nurburgring circuit is very much characterized by its tight corners, some of which are semi-blind turns. Tire wear is a definite issue in long races here, especially in wet conditions. Even more important, however, is braking early for almost every corner; perhaps only the narrow streets of Monaco require more braking than does the Nurburgring circuit. Pit Straight: This straightaway is fairly long, but the Start/Finish Line is near the exit of the final corner. The Pit Lane rejoins the course near the end of the Pit Straight, just before the Castrol S. Turns 1 and 2 (Castrol S): Moderate braking is required before entering this right-left 'S' curve. It is quite easy to miss seeing the entry to the Castrol S unless traffic is present to mark the corner for you. Until you know the course really well, expect to find yourself driving straight ahead into the recovery area. Turn 2 is actually somewhat of a double-apex left-hand corner, so do not go too wide initially on exit. Also, be careful not to drive too wide exiting the Castrol S. Caution must be taken here on the first lap of a race, as the traffic truly bunches up here. Turn 3: Light braking or a quick lift of the accelerator will be necessary for this left-hand corner. However, hard braking will be required for the Ford Curve ahead. Beginning at the top of Turn 3, the course moves downhill. Turn 4 (Ford Curve): This is a hard right-hand corner, practically a 'J' curve. The course continues its downhill slope here, which significantly adds to the difficulty of the turn, especially in wet condditions. Braking too late here means a trip through the kitty litter, while riding up on the inside rumble strips usually means losing control of the car. This is definitely NOT a place to pass unless absolutely necessary. Straightaway: The course fades to the left here. If you can accelerate well out of the Ford Curve, you should be able to pass several cars here as you continue downhill. Turn 5 (Dunlop Curve): Severe braking for this hairpin is a must, unless you really want to drive through the sand. Again, rolling up on the rumble strips on the inside of the curve may cause you to lose control of the car; however, I have several times induced slight wheelspin of the right-side tires on the rumble strip, which helped to swing the car around the corner just a little faster. The course continues gently uphill here toward the Audi S. Turns 6 and 7 (Audi S): Entering the left-right Audi S, the uphill slope of the course increases, making it very difficult to see the course more than a few feet ahead. The exit of Turn 6 is the crest of this hill. Unless traffic blocks your racing line, the entire Audi S section can be taken at top speed if you have a good racing line, so good acceleration out of the Dunlop Curve will be very beneficial for passing entering Turn 6 and/or exiting Turn 7. Turn 8 (RTL Curve): With the rise in the course entering the left-hand RTL Curve, this appears to be identical to Turn 6 on approach. However, you MUST use moderate braking entering the RTL Curve, or you will definitely be off in the grass on the outside of the curve. After a short straightaway, this corner is followed by the gentler BIT Curve. Turn 9 (BIT Curve): This right-hand curve will require light or moderate braking, depending on how much acceleration was used in the brief straightaway following the RTL Curve. Turn 10 (Bilstein-Bogen): This is a gentle right-hand semi- corner which can be taken at full throttle. From here to the Veedal S, the course makes its final and steepest upward slope. Turns 11 and 12 (Veedal S): This is an extremely tight left- right made even worse for the drivers by its placement at the very crest of the hill. For those who overshoot the chicane, there is a newly-added barrier to collect you and your car. Turn 13 (Coca-Cola Curve): A 'J' turn to the right, moderate braking is required here to keep from sliding off the course. The entry of the Coca-Cola Curve is also where the Pit Lane begins, so cars may be slowing on approach to go to Pit Lane for servicing. This is the final corner of the circuit. Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins at the entry of the final corner. It is extremely important to slow down before entering Pit Lane; if you come in too fast, you will certainly damage the front of the car on the barrier. Keep tight to the right for Pit Entry, to allow those continuing the race to have the prime racing line to the left of the pavement. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF FRANCE: NEVERS MAGNY-COURS The Magny-Cours circuit is characterized by long, sweeping straightaways, and fairly quick corners. The Adelaide hairpin will almost definitely cause trouble, especially for aggressive drivers, and is one of the slowest corners in modern F1 racing. This is a very fun course to drive (admittedly a very subjective statement), but its layout can produce problems from the standpoint of hearing other cars: Three of its main straightaways are almost exactly parallel to each other with little distance and no large obstacles between them, sometimes making it difficult to determine where other cars are truly located around you as you try to anticipate where the next group of traffic that you will need to navigate is located; listen attentively to the team radio for useful traffic information. The circuit also has extremely wide areas along most of the main course for a car to pull aside should a major malfunction arise. Pit Straight: Following the tight High School chicane, strong acceleration through the Pit Straight creates good passing chances through Great Curve and into Estoril. However, the tightness of the High School chicane and the incredibly close proximity of the Pit Lane barrier requires immense caution and headache-causing concentration as you come onto the Pit Straight. The Start/Finish Line is about halfway down the Pit Straight; the Pit Lane rejoins the course from the left at this point. Turn 1 (Great Curve): In accordance with its name, this is a sweeping left-hand corner which can be taken flat-out unless encumbered by a lot of traffic. Turn 2 (Estoril): Either light or moderate braking will be needed for entering the VERY long right-hand 180-degree Estoril; in either case, you will almost certainly be tapping the brakes repeatedly through Estoril. It is quite easy to roll the right-side tires off onto the grass, and it is just as easy to slip off onto the grass on the outside of Estoril - both can easily occur, whether navigating traffic or driving alone. Straightaway (Golf): The Golf Straight if by far the longest of the course and includes several fades to the right. Turn 3 (Adelaide): The right-hand Adelaide hairpin is EXTREMELY tight. The key here is to brake EARLY, as you will be downshifting from your top gear to your lowest gear rapidly; if you begin braking too late, you will be off in the grass. If you accelerate too soon out of Adelaide, you will be rolling through the kitty litter and losing valuable track position. Even 30MPH is likely to be too fast here. Straightaway: Acceleration out of Adelaide is important for passing other cars here. There are a few fades in the course here. Turns 4 and 5 (Nurburgring): This is a right-left chicane which will require light braking. It is possible to fly through Nurburgring without braking by making use of the bright-green extension on the inside of Turn 5; however, this extension is significantly shorter than it was in F1 Championship Season 2000. Turn 6 (180 Degrees): This is quite true - the official name of this corner is '180 Degrees' according to the official Web site of Magny-Cours. This is a wide left-hand hairpin nestled well within the Estoril hairpin. Running too wide here will put you out in the sand; running too close to the apex could put you up on the rumble strips and force you to lose control. While this corner is not as slow as the Adelaide hairpin, you really do not want to try pushing very much faster here. Straightaway: The third of the three parallel-running straightaways, this 'straightaway' has several fades before the Imola chicane. Turns 7 and 8 (Imola): This right-left chicane should require light braking, except for cars with a flawless racing line. The bright-green extension on the inside of Turn 8 is longer than in F1 Championship Season 2000, which could well be used for top-speed navigation of the chicane. A short straightaway out of Imola sets up the Water Castle curve. Turn 9 (Water Castle): Somewhere between a standard 'J' turn and a hairpin, this is an increasing-radius right-hand corner leading into the final straightaway of the circuit. Turns 10 and 11 (High School): There is a false line of pavement to the right as you near the official chicane; this false pavement runs directly up to an immovable barrier (I believe this is the Pit Entry for other forms of racing at the circuit). The official chicane requires moderate braking on entering, and allows for a VERY short burst of acceleration on exit. If you completely miss this chicane, you will blast through the sand trap and break the front end on a perpendicular barrier blocking any direct access to Pit Lane. Turn 12 (High School): On entry, the Pit Lane begins to the left. The official corner is a TIGHT right-hand turn which requires moderate or even heavy braking; wheel lock is very much a possibility here, especially in wet conditions. If you miss the corner, you will blast through the all-too-brief sand trap and ram directly against a barrier and bounce backward into any cars behind you. Speed is an extreme concern here; it is virtually impossible to go too slow, but going too fast will definitely result in a crash (with great possibility of bouncing into follow-up crashes with other cars, or with another nearby barrier). Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins to the left at the entry of Turn 12. The Pit Lane has its own sharp right-hand turn almost immediately, so it is best to begin slowing (or rather, barely accelerating) as you leave the High School chicane. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF GREAT BRITAIN: SILVERSTONE For the 2000 F1 season, the British Grand Prix was moved up in the racing calendar, and resulted in a very wet weekend (although the race itself was semi-sunny); fortunately, FIA learned its lesson and moved the British Grand Prix further back in the calendar. Built on an airport site which will host the race until at least 2010, this historic course features wide run-off areas in most places. Pit Straight: The Start/Finish Line is directly at the beginning of the Pit Straight. There is no room for error on the right side of the track, as the Pit Lane barrier is directly against the pavement. Turn 1 (Copse): This is a moderate right-hand corner which can be taken at full speed, but be careful to not run off the course at the exit of the turn. The best racing line is to tightly hug the apex, but the Pit Lane barrier is right there against the pavement, so it is imperative to keep the right- side tires from rubbing the barrier. Turn 1 exits onto a long straightaway. Straightaway: The Pit Lane rejoins the main course from the right about 1/3 of the way along the straight. Turns 2-5 (Bechetts): This is a set of left-right-left-right 'S' curves. Turns 2 through 4 can be taken at full speed or with very quick tapping of the brakes, but Turn 5 requires moderate braking to keep to the pavement. Turn 6 (Chapel): This is a gentle left-hand corner which can be taken at full speed. This opens onto Hangar Straight. Straightaway (Hangar Straight): At 738.28m, this is by far the longest straightaway of the course. Powerful acceleration out of Turn 5 (the final corner of Bechetts) can lead to good passing opportunities along Hangar Straight and/or entering the almost-nonexistent braking zone for Turn 7 (Stowe). Note: To your left is the Roger Clark Circuit, owned and operated by the same organization which owns and operates this Grand Prix Circuit. Turn 7 (Stowe): Light braking or a quick lift off the accelerator will be required here (unless blocked by traffic) in order to remain on the pavement. This is a tricky, sweeping, right-hand corner followed immediately by a left- hand semi-corner. This is the southernmost point of the course. Straightaway (Vale): If you can somehow successfully navigate Stowe without braking or lifting, then you should be able to continue passing others fairly easily along Vale, especially if they had to brake heavily in Stowe. Turns 8 and 9 (Club): There is a stretch of pavement to the left, but that is NOT the official course; in fact, it has a tall barrier blocking a clear path for those who wish to accumulate a Stop-Go Penalty. The official corner is a tight left-hand turn followed by the increasing-radius right-hand Turn 9, leading out onto another long straightaway (Abbey Straight). Turns 10 and 11 (Abbey): Like the previous set of corners, there is another stretch of pavement to the left which is not part of the official course; as before, this patch of pavement is blocked by a tall barrier, and taking this route will accumulate a Stop-Go Penalty. The official Turn 10 is a tight left-hand corner, but not as tight as Turn 8. This is immediately followed by a Turn 11, a right-hand corner which can be cleared with little or no braking depending on how much you slowed entering Abbey. Be careful not to slip off the course and rub the nearby barrier on exiting Abbey. Straightaway (Farm Straight): With good acceleration out of Abbey, good passing opportunities can be made here. Turns 12-16: This final segment of the circuit is very similar to The Stadium at Hockenheim. However, these similar segments cannot be approached in the same manner. Turn 12 (Bridge): Immediately after passing underneath the pedestrian bridge, you will enter a complex similar to The Stadium at Hokkenheim. This is a right-hand corner which can likely be taken at full speed. Turn 13 (Priory): This left-hand corner will require moderate braking. Turn 14 (Brooklands): Another left-hand corner, this one requires heavy braking. There is a small sand trap for those who miss the braking zone. Turn 15 (Luffield): This set of right-hand corners essentially forms a 'U' shape, and requires moderate or severe braking to avoid sliding off into the kitty litter. The exit of Luffield can be taken flat-out all the way to Turn 5. The entry to Pit Lane is on the right shortly leaving Luffield. Turn 16 (Woodcote): Barely a corner but more than a fade, the course eases to the right here. The right-side barrier begins abruptly here (be careful not to hit it). Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins to the right between Luffield and Woodcote. The new Pit Lane has a gentle right-hand swing, so you can come into Pit Lane at top speed and have plenty of room to slow. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF GERMANY: HOCKENHEIM Surrounded by multitudes of trees which make much of the circuit rather dark in wet races, this is the fastest course used for F1 racing in 2001. If not for the Jim Clark, Brems, and Ayrton Senna chicanes, cars would be flying around the course in top gear all the way from the North Curve (Turn 1) to the entry of the Stadium (Turn 10). Except for the right side of the Pit Straight, there is more than enough room to pull well off the pavement should a car have a serious problem on any part of the circuit. It is truly interesting that the German Grand Prix immediately follows the British Grand Prix, due to The Stadium here at Hockenheim and its unnamed similar segment at Silverstone. Pit Straight: This is an extremely short straightaway compared to the rest of the course. Turn 1 (North Curve): This right-hand corner will require moderate braking to keep out of the expansive kitty litter. The Pit Lane rejoins the course from the right at the exit of North Curve. Acceleration out of North Curve is of key importance due to the length of the ensuing straightaway. Straightaway: Immensely lengthy and lined with trees, speed is of the utmost importance here. The entire straightaway is an extremely gentle fade to the right. Drift to the left when you reach the grandstands. Turns 2 and 3 (Jim Clark Chicane): Former games in the series had a patch of pavement heading straight off Turn 2, allowing for shortcutting of the chicane; this is no longer possible, as a nasty barrier blocks any shortcutting attempts. Moderate or heavy braking will be required for Turn 2 (or light braking if not in traffic and using a FLAWLESS racing line which makes judicious use of the rumble strips), but full acceleration can be taken leading out of the chicane. Straightaway: Yet another long, sweeping straightaway which fades calmly to the right, so powerful acceleration out of the Jim Clark Chicane is imperative to keep from getting passed. Drift to the left before entering the Brems Chicane, and begin braking much earlier than for the Jim Clark Chicane. Turns 4 and 5 (Brems Chicane): The original course configuration (used in older F1 racing games) did not have a chicane here, and the original pavement remains. However, the official course suddenly cuts tightly to the right and then cuts tightly to the left to rejoin the old pavement. Moderate braking will be needed for Turn 4, and light braking for Turn 5. This right-left chicane has a continual downhill slope, adding to the difficulty of the chicane. Even with the Flags option disabled, the angle of the old pavement to the official chicane is such that it is impossible to blast through this segment at top speed without spinning the car through the kitty litter. Turn 6 (East Curve): This is a very wide right-hand corner which can be taken at top speed. Strong acceleration out of Brems is key to assist in passing here. Straightaway: This is yet another long straightaway, but without any fades. Drift to the right for the Ayrton Senna Chicane. Turns 7-9 (Ayrton Senna Chicane): DO NOT follow the old course pavement directly ahead unless you really WANT to collide with the brand-new barrier. The official course turns to the left, cuts to the right, and eases left again. It is actually possible to speed into Turn 7 at top speed, lift off the throttle through Turn 8, and accelerate quickly out of the chicane - but this is certainly NOT recommended. Straightaway: The final long straightaway of the course has extra pavement on the left - this could potentially be a place to pass large numbers of cars. This extra pavement begins shortly after the exit of the Ayrton Senna Chicane, and ends at the entry of the Stadium; thus, if you are on this 'extra' pavement entering the Stadium, you will have a better racing line for Turn 10, allowing you to navigate the corner with less. Turns 10-13 (The Stadium): This is similar to the final segment of the Silverstone circuit. However, do not expect to drive The Stadium the same way you would the final segment at Silverstone. Turn 10 (Entrance to the Stadium: Agip Curve): Light braking may be required here, but you should be able to pass through the Agip Curve without any braking at all (especially if your racing line began with the 'extra' pavement on the left before the Stadium). A short straightaway follows. Turn 11 (Continuing through the Stadium: Sachscurve): This is a left-hand wide hairpin turn, requiring moderate braking. Be careful not to end up in the grass, either entering or exiting the corner. Straightaway (Continuing through the Stadium): This short straightaway has a fade to the left, followed by a fade to the right. Turns 12 and 13 (Exiting the Stadium: Opel): The first right-hand corner is somewhat tight, and heavy braking will be required here; the old course rejoins the current course from the left on exit, so if you run wide in this corner, you can likely recover here using the old pavement. The final corner of the circuit is a right-hand turn which will require moderate braking. The Pit Lane entry is to the right just before the official Turn 13. Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins to the right at the entry of Turn 13 (the final corner of the Stadium). ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF HUNGARY: HUNGARORING The Hungaroring circuit has wide run-off areas, which can be quite important, especially for Turn 1. It is imperative to qualify near the top of the grid and be (one of) the first through this corner, as traffic backs up tremendously here at the start of a race - moreso than at most other circuits due to the extremely nasty configuration of the first turn. Pit Straight: Like Interlagos, Pit Straight is the highest elevation on the course and a very long straightaway. Actually, the highest elevation is at the very end of the Pit Straight, at the entrance of Turn 1, due to the continual uphill slope. Turn 1: It's all downhill from here, almost literally. This tight right-hand hairpin corner is downhill all the way through, making early braking a necessity; plus, you will certainly be tapping the brakes all the way through this important first turn. If you do overrun the corner, there is a huge sand trap for your inconvenience. However, if you roll up on the inside rumble strips, expect your car to spin violently and collide with anything nearby. Turns 2 and 3: After a short straightaway, Turn 2 is a left- hand 'J' turn requiring moderate braking. Turn 2 is quickly followed by Turn 3, a light-braking right-hand corner which must be taken at full throttle on exit to set up passing opportunities through Turn 3 and along the ensuing straightaway. Turn 4: This moderate left-hand corner may require light braking or may be taken flat-out. Plenty of kitty litter awaits those who overrun the corner. Turn 5: Moderate braking is necessary for this right-hand 'J' turn. Plenty of sand is available on both sides of the pavement here, just in case. Turns 6 and 7: The CPU is very touchy about this right-left chicane; virtually ANY short-cutting here results in a Stop- Go Penalty. There is plenty of sand here as well, just in case. Turn 6 is tight, requiring heavy braking. Turn 7 requires moderate braking, and beware the barrier on exit if you happen to swing out too wide. Turn 8: This moderate left-hand corner may require light braking, but may also be taken as a full speed passing zone if using rapid reflexes and a flawless racing line. Turn 9: Almost immediately following Turn 8, this right-hand corner definitely requires moderate braking to keep to the pavement. Accelerate strongly out of Turn 9 to set up good passing opportunities. Turn 10: An easy left-hand corner which can be taken at top speed, but only with a good racing line. This is a prime place to pass if sufficient acceleration was made out of Turn 9. Turn 11: Shortly following Turn 10, the right-hand Turn 11 requires moderate braking to stay out of the kitty litter on the outside of the corner. Turns 12 and 13: This is a right-left chicane for which the CPU is again very touchy concerning shortcutting. Turn 14: This is a narrow 'J' turn to the left. At first, there is plenty of sand to the outside for those who overrun the corner, but then a metal barrier rubs up against the pavement beginning about halfway around the corner, so DO NOT overrun the corner if you like having the right side of the car intact. The course begins its steep uphill trajectory here. A very short straightaway follows. Turn 15: At the entry of this final corner is the Pit Lane entry, so beware of slower cars on the right. The official corner itself is a tight, uphill, right-hand hairpin with little room for those who overrun the corner. Accelerate strongly (but not too early) out of this final corner to pass along the Pit Straight and put on a show for the spectators. Do not take this corner too tightly, or you will damage the right-side tires on the Pit Lane barrier. Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins at the entry of Turn 15 on the right; begin slowing (rather, do not accelerate much) at the end of Turn 14 (the left-hand 'J' turn). ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF BELGIUM: SPA-FRANCORCHAMPS This is a well-storied course used for many forms of racing. The longest course used in the 2001 F1 season, the forest setting is rather scenic. This is also home to the famous Turn 1 - the La Source hairpin - which is deemed the slowest corner in all of F1 racing. As at Hungaroring, it is very important to be at the front of the grid on the first lap to safely navigate the first turn. Due to the forest setting, much of the circuit is perpetually shadowed, which is especially significant if racing in wet or overcast conditions. Pit Straight: Strong acceleration out of the Bus Stop chicane allows SOME room for passing here. Fortunately, the Start/Finish Line has been moved back away from La Source. The course also slopes downward here, all the way through La Source. Turn 1 (La Source): This is an incredibly tight right-hand hairpin. Fortunately, there is plenty of swing-out room and plenty of recovery space, both paved, which can provide a great passing opportunity by taking an extremely wide racing line. The downward slope of the course is not much here, but it does add to the difficulty of this hairpin turn. Brake lock-up and the resultant flat-spotting of the tires is quite easy to inadvertently accomplish here, especially in wet racing conditions, so caution is extremely important. If a car in front of you takes the wrong racing line, passing here can be easy if you can suddenly dart either to the outside or the inside of the turn. Passing can also occur here if you brake REALLY late. Straightaway (Eau Rouge): Immediately at the exit of La Source is where Pit Lane rejoins the main course, so try to keep away from the inside of the course here, especially since the barrier prevents cars exiting La Source to see cars exiting Pit Lane (and vice versa). To the right is the Pit Lane for the 24-hour races held at Spa-Francorchamps; take care not to smash into this concrete Pit Lane barrier, especially if you are too hard on the accelerator exiting La Source and force the car into a slide or a spin to the right. Immediately after passing the 'other' Pit Lane and entering Eau Rouge (Red Water), the straightaway has several fades during a semi-blind steep uphill climb into Turn 2. It is all too easy to misjudge the racing line and wind up out in the sand and the grass on either side of the pavement here, so memorization of this segment of the circuit is just as important as perfect timing in order to keep the car on the pavement. Until this corner can be taken flawlessly, it is best to keep to single-file driving through the fades. Turn 2 (Eau Rouge): This is an easy right-hand corner at the top of the steep uphill climb. The kitty litter on either side of the course fades away shortly after the corner. Straightaway (Kemmel): The course truly enters the forested area here, with trees lining both sides of the course and casting lengthy shadows which make this area of the circuit rather dark when racing in wet conditions. Cars can easily achieve speeds over 200MPH by the end of this straightaway. The end of Kemmel is where Mika Hakkinen made 'The Pass' on Michael Schumacher in the 2000 Grand Prix of Belgium. Turns 3-5 (Malmedy): This is a right-left-right combination of corners. Moderate or even heavy braking is necessary entering Malmedy (Turn 3), but little or no braking is needed for Turn 4. After an almost non-existent straightaway, light braking is needed for Turn 5 to keep from running into the nearby grandstand. The Malmedy complex has plenty of run-off room, comprised of both sand and grass, with minor short- cutting permitted by the CPU. Entering Malmedy, be sure not to keep going straight along another stretch of pavement (part of the old circuit), which leads to a barrier. Straightaway: Between Malmedy and Bruxelles (the French spelling of 'Brussels,' the capital of Belgium), the course takes a steep downward trajectory. This can be a good passing zone for those who did not need to use the brakes (much) leaving the Malmedy complex. Turn 6 (Bruxelles): The course continues downhill all the way through this right-hand hairpin, making heavy braking a necessity before the corner as well as light braking most of the way through Bruxelles, especially if the tires are rather worn. If any corner is to be overrun on a regular basis during the course of the race, this is it (due to the downhill slope), so the wide sandy recovery area may actually be a blessing in disguise. However, due to the slope of the hill, running up on the rumble strips on the inside of the turn may well result in a spin or other loss of control; if done 'correctly,' this may also result in launching the vehicle airborne. Turn 7: Shortly following Bruxelles, this left-hand corner requires moderate braking. Turn 8 and 9 (Pouhon): These two easy left-hand corners essentially form a wide 'U' shape, and require light or moderate braking. There is plenty of run-off room here, if needed, on both sides of the pavement. Turns 10 and 11 (Fagnes): This right-left complex will require moderate braking on entry, and possibly tapping the brakes through Turn 11 as well. Accelerate well out of Fagnes to pass one or two cars on the short straightaway which follows. Turn 12 (Stavelot): This is another right-hand corner, requiring light or moderate braking. It is highly important to accelerate STRONG out of Stavelot, as you won't be using the brakes again until the Bus Stop Chicane. Turn 13 (Blanchimont): This is a long, sweeping, left-hand corner which must be carried at top speed (from Stavelot) or else you WILL be passed by others. The trees here are pretty, but keep your eyes on the road, especially due to the shadows cast over the circuit. Turns 14-17 (Bus Stop Chicane): This is a tight left-right followed by a super-short straightaway and a tight right- left. The beginning of the chicane is at the top of a small rise, so the first two turns are blocked from view on approach (especially from Driver View) unless other cars are there to mark the course for you. Moderate braking should be used for both parts of the Bus Stop, but true experts can semi-easily fly through the Bus Stop at top speed without incurring a Stop-Go Penalty for shortcutting the chicane (but be prepared to save the car should the rumble strips cause you to lose control). Pit Entry: While the Bus Stop Chicane begins here with a tight left-hand corner, the Pit Lane continues straight ahead, with a quick right-left mini-chicane of its own. There is not much room in Pit Lane to slow down before reaching the Paddock, so slow on the main course, but keep to the right to allow cars remaining in the race to pass you on the left as they enter the Bus Stop Chicane. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF ITALY: MONZA This historic high-speed track hosts a highly partial pro- Ferrari crowd - affectionately known as the 'tifosi.' The 2000 Italian Grand Prix is the race in which a volunteer corner worker was killed at the Roggia Chicane, due to all the flying debris from the first-lap multi-car collision caused by Heinz-Herald Frentzen missing his braking zone. This is also the final race of the 'European' season; the final two races are both overseas, 'flyaway' races (at Indianapolis and Suzuka). Pit Straight: Strong acceleration out of the Curva Parabolica can create prime passing opportunities along the Pit Straight, the longest straightaway at Monza. The Pit Lane begins on the right shortly after exiting the Parabolica. Turns 1-3 (Rettifilio): The new chicane here is a tight right-left with a gentle right turn back into line with the original pavement. The chicane is blocked by a barrier, but the inside of Turn 1 has a paved 'extension' which may be of benefit. Even with Flags on, shortcutting the chicane TO THE RIGHT OF THE BARRIER can be done at top speed, thus lowering lap times; shortcutting to the left of the barrier results in a Stop-Go Penalty. Turn 4 (Biassono): This sweeping right-hand corner among the thick trees can be taken flat-out. To the left is a long, wide area of sand, but the corner is so extremely gentle that the sand should not be needed for any reason unless you blow an engine or severely puncture a tire. Turns 5 and 6 (Roggia): Despite the flatness of the Monza circuit, this chicane is extremely difficult to see on approach unless traffic is present to mark the pavement for you, so it is very easy to overrun the chicane. This is a very tight left-right chicane, so moderate or heavy braking is required; shortcutting through here at full throttle is possible by making use of the new, narrow, bright-green extensions on the inside of each corner, as the CPU us rather tolerant of shortcutting here (compared to previous incarnations of the game). There is a large sand trap for those who miss the chicane altogether. Turn 7 (First Lesmo): This right-hand corner requires moderate braking. There is a wide sand trap on the outside of the corner, just in case. Beware the barrier on the inside of the corner. About 150MPH is the maximum speed here, or you risk slipping off the course and into the kitty litter. If you shortcut the first two chicanes of the game, this will be the first time you absolutely need to use the brakes. Turn 8 (Second Lesmo): This right-hand corner is a little tighter than First Lesmo, and also has a significant area of kitty litter on the outside of the corner. Moderate braking will be needed here. Again, beware the barrier on the inside of the corner. Generally, about 140MPH is the maximum speed here to keep from sliding off the pavement. Straightaway/Turn 9 (Serraglio): This is really just a fade to the left, but the official course map lists this as a curve. Counting this as a fade, this marks about the halfway point on the longest straightaway of the Monza circuit. There is sufficient room to pull off the course here on either side if necessary, except when passing underneath the first bridge. The circuit is extremely bumpy between the two bridges. Turns 10-12 (Ascari): The Ascari chicane is more difficult than it seems. Turn 10 is a left-hand corner requiring at least light braking. This is followed immediately by a right-hand corner requiring moderate braking. Turn 12 can be taken at full acceleration if you slowed enough in Turn 11. Wide areas of grass and sand are available for those overruninng any part of the chicane. Still, unless encumbered by traffic, experts may be able to take Ascari at full throttle with a flawless racing line which makes use of the rumble strips as well as the bright-green 'extension' on the inside of Turn 10. Unfortunately, F1 2001 does not provide the real course's paved swing-out area at the exit of Ascari. Straightaway (Rettilineo Parabolica): This is the second- longest straightaway at Monza and a prime passing zone, especially with powerful acceleration out of Ascari. Turn 13 (Curva Parabolica): This final corner is a very-wide increasing-radius right-hand hairpin. Light or moderate braking is required on entry, but after about one-third of the way around the hairpin, stand on the accelerator all the way through to Rettifilio. The outside of the Curva Parabolica has an immense expanse of kitty litter, but this really should not be necessary unless you suddenly need to take evasive action to avoid someone else's accident. After the Lesmo corners, the Curva Parabolica is the third and final place where braking is a definite MUST. Pit Entry: Shortly after exiting the Curva Parabolica, the Pit Lane begins on the right. This is perhaps the shortest Pit Lane in all of F1; there is virtually NO room for deceleration once leaving the main course, so cars going in for servicing will begin slowing at the exit of the Curva Parabolica. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF THE UNITED STATES: INDIANAPOLIS The inaugural U.S. Grand Prix was significant for two reasons. First, for the first time ever, cars were racing 'backward' (clockwise) at Indianapolis. Second, cars were racing in the rain, which is virtually unheard-of in American auto racing (CART is an exception, but only on road courses). Fortunately, FIA gave the live rights to ABC for the American audience, a very intelligent move to try to increase F1's exposure in the American market; this would not have been nearly as effective if SpeedVision had been permitted the live rights for the race, as SpeedVision is a cable- /satellite-only channel, and not all cable systems carry SpeedVision in their more affordable packages (in Tucson, I personally pay $25 extra per month just to get the package which includes SpeedVision). Except the Pit Straight, the U.S. Grand Prix circuit features wide run-off areas, especially along Hulman Blvd. According to many of the drivers, part of the 'mystique' of the U.S. Grand Prix at Indianapolis is the closeness of the spectators; at no other F1 circuit are the fans literally 'just across the wall' from the cars (the main grandstands at Albert Park would come closest). The U.S. Grand Prix begins the final 'flyaway' (non-European) races of the 2001 season. Pit Straight: This is the same as the Pit Straight used for the Indy and NASCAR races here, but the F1 cars drive in the 'wrong' direction (clockwise). Expect top speeds close to or even exceeding 200MPH. Turns 1 and 2: After more than 25 seconds at full throttle, this tight right-left combination can be deadly if you miss the braking zone. Brake early and hard to safely navigate Turn 1 in first or second gear, then accelerate violently through Turn 2. Turn 3: This is a sweeping right-hand corner which can be taken at top speed. Turn 4: This is a long right-hand 'J' turn requiring moderate braking to keep to the pavement. Turn 5: Another right-hand corner, this corner requires light or moderate braking, and can be a good passing zone with good braking on entry. Turn 6: This left-hand hairpin requires good braking throughout. Accelerating too soon will certainly put you out on the grass. Turn 7: This is a right-hand 'J' turn onto the famous Hulman Blvd., which leads to the Indy Museum. Moderate braking is need here, but there is fortunately an immense paved swing- out area on exit which stretches much of the way toward Turn 8. Straightaway (Hulman Blvd.): This is the longest straightaway of the infield section of the Indianapolis F1 circuit, so strong acceleration exiting Turn 7 is key here. Turn 8: Turning to the left, this corner requires moderate or heavy braking, depending on your car's top speed on Hulman Blvd. However, the following straightaway is extremely short, so do not expect to accelerate much (if at all) before 'Mickey' and 'Mouse.' Turn 9 ('Mickey'): This is a tight right-hand 'J' turn, nicknamed 'Mickey' by the sportscasters at the inaugural F1 race at Indianapolis. This is a second-gear corner at best, but first gear is probably a better choice here. Turn 10 ('Mouse'): This tight left-hand hairpin corner was nicknamed 'Mouse' by sportscasters. Any dry-conditions speed above 40MPH will certainly force you off the course and into the grass. A strong, short burst of acceleration out of 'Mouse' can set up a good passing opportunity in Turn 11. Take care not to induce wheelspin on exit. Turn 11: This long right-hand corner is the final corner of the course requiring braking. It is still fairly easy to slip off the course (especially in wet racing conditions), so be careful here. From here all the way to the end of the Pit Straight, you should be fully on the accelerator for approximately 28 seconds before braking for the first corner. Turn 12: This right-hand corner brings the cars back out onto the oval used for Indy and NASCAR races, and coming back out onto the banking may be a little challenging at first. No braking is required here. Turn 13: This is the banked 'Turn 1' of the Indy and NASCAR races here, but taken in reverse (clockwise) for the U.S. Grand Prix. It is important to hug the apex of the corner tightly, but keep off the infield grass. Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins just before Turn 13. There is plenty of room to enter Pit Lane and slow down, so keep up to speed while still on the main circuit. ============================================== GRAND PRIX OF JAPAN: SUZUKA This world-famous circuit in figure-eight style is used for many forms of auto and motorcycle racing; as such, those who have played other racing games (such as Moto GP World Tour or Le Mans 24 Hours) may already have some familiarity with the Suzuka circuit. One of the most famous sights of the 'circuit' is the large Ferris Wheel on the left behind the grandstands as cars pass along the Pit Straight. This is the circuit where Michael Schumacher won the 2000 Driver's Championship. Suzuka was once the official test circuit for Honda, with the figure-eight configuration ensuring that there were a near-equal number of both left-hand and right- hand turns; similarly, the circuit was purposely designed to include as many types of corners and situations as possible, which makes the Suzuka circuit more technically difficult than it might at first appear to Suzuka novices. Pit Straight: Good speeds can be achieved here with strong acceleration out of the chicane. The Pit Lane rejoins the course from the right near the end of the Pit Straight. Turn 1: This right-hand (almost double-apex) hairpin requires moderate braking on approach, and you will likely be tapping the brakes through the hairpin itself. This begins an uphill climb, and it is difficult to see the left side of the pavement on exit, so be careful not to run too wide and end up out in the sand. There is really no reason to overrun the hairpin on entry, as the corner is quite easily identifiable. Turns 2-5 (S Curves): This is by far the hardest section of the course - tight left-right-left-right corners. The first of the 'S' curves can likely be taken at full speed, with light or moderate braking for Turn 3. Turn 4 can be taken either flat-out (not suggested) or with light braking. No matter what, slam HARD on the brakes for Turn 5, the tightest corner of the 'S' section. This entire segment of the course continues the uphill climb, making Turn 5 particularly more difficult. There is ample recovery room on either side of the course through the uphill 'S' section. The 'S' section is a good place to pass slower cars, if you have enough confidence in your brakes to pass during corner entry. No matter what, you will NOT be surviving the 'S' curves unless you use the brakes generously - or use only second or third gear. Turn 6 (Dunlop Curve): This sweeping left-hand corner is the crest of the initial uphill segment of the course. However, it is best to brake lightly or at least lift off the accelerator to keep from sliding out into the grass and sand on the right side of the long corner. Turn 7 (Degner): Here, the course turns to the right in anticipation of the figure-eight pattern. Light braking will likely be required, but it is possible to speed through here without braking. To the outside of the course is a wide expanse of grass and sand in case you overrun the corner. Turn 8 (Degner): The final right-hand corner before passing underneath the bridge, this turn is tighter than the previous corner, thus moderate or heavy braking and a steady racing line will be required here. This is also another prime passing zone. Take care not to overrun Turn 8, or your front-left tire will be damaged. Straightaway: Accelerate strongly out of Degner and you may be able to pass one or two cars as you race underneath the bridge. The course fades to the right here before reaching the tight Hairpin. The fade is a good place to begin braking for Hairpin. Turn 9 (Hairpin): This is a tight left-hand hairpin which begins the next uphill segment of the Suzuka circuit. It is possible to shortcut a little here, but the grass combined with the angle of the hill here will really slow you down and perhaps cause you to spin and/or slide, especially in wet conditions. Be careful not to accelerate too soon, or you will be out in the grass. There is a sizeable patch of kitty litter for those who miss the hairpin completely or lock the wheels. Turn 10: Continuing the uphill run, the course here makes a wide sweep to the right. Any braking here means losing track positions. Turns 11 and 12 (Spoon): This is a tricky pair of left-hand corners, in a decreasing-radius 'U' formation. The first corner is fairly standard, requiring little braking. However, Turn 12 is both tighter AND slopes downhill, so judicious usage of brakes and a pristine racing line are both important here, especially if attempting to pass a slower vehicle. If you repeatedly misjudge any single corner at Suzuka, it will be Turn 12; fortunately, there is plenty of recovery room on both sides of the pavement here. However, do not roll up on the rumble strips or the grass on the inside of Turn 12, as that will almost certainly cause you to lose control and likely spin. Straightaway: Power out of Spoon and rocket down the straightaway, passing multiple cars. After you cross the bridge, start thinking about the chicane. (If you feel a bit cocky, try speeding through the Pit Lane for the support races, located on the right as you start uphill again - this Pit Lane will be familiar to those who have played Le mans 24 Hours.) Turn 13 (130R): Shortly after crossing the bridge, the course turns gently to the left. Light braking or - even better - a quick lift off the accelerator - is almost certainly required at 130R to keep from sliding off-course, although experts can speed through here at full throttle with an excellent racing line and no encumbering traffic. Turns 14-16 (Chicane): This is the trickiest part of the course (even moreso than Hairpin), and quite likely the one area which will determine whether or not you can execute a good lap time. The chicane begins with a moderate turn to the right, then a tight left-hand corner, then ends with a wider turn to the right and empties out onto the Pit Straight; all of this is on a downhill slope, adding to the inherent difficulty of Chicane. Fortunately, the inside of the chicane is filled with only sand, not barriers, but shortcutting the chicane will likely result in a loss of control (due to the rumble strips and the kitty litter), or at least cause you to slow tremendously. Be careful coming out of Turn 15 so that you don't go too wide and bump the right side of the vehicle on the Pit Lane barrier. Pit Entry: Using the old entrance to Pit lane, the Pit Lane begins to the right just before Chicane. The current real- world course configuration has cars entering Pit Lane from the tiny stretch between Turns 15 and 16. ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== WISH LIST There are several additions and modifications I hope EA Sports makes in future versions of their F1 racing games:. These are not presented in any particular order. 1.) Handling options should be given for Normal Handling. Set-up options should include more than just tires when using Normal Handling; a smaller list of set-up options, perhaps those used in F1 2000, should be offered. 2.) While I really like the race information at the top-left and top-right of the screen, most of it is really too small to be seen easily by those (like myself) who use a small television with the PS2. This information needs to be enlarged for easier viewing. 3.) Similarly, I really miss having the running order by driver listed on the left side of the screen (as in F1 Championship Season 2000). Beyond the game itself, this information also helps players to recognize driver names and teams and colors. 4.) Please bring back Scenario Mode and Training Mode!!!!! 5.) The FIA Rules, as used in F1 2001, are FAR too oppressive. While FIA Rules should indeed be an option, it would be best to allow users to use a sub-menu to select which FIA Rules to use in a particular race. Also, if FIA has a minimum speed rule, it DEFINITELY needs to be implemented in future incarnations of the game. 6.) Unfortunately, the player is currently not given the option of choosing a driver within each team, which would be a nice addition to Teammate Challenge. 7.) When it comes to serving a Stop-Go Penalty, F1 2001 DOES NOT follow the official rules, which state that a driver can make no more than three complete laps before coming to Pit Lane to serve the Penalty. F1 2001 allows the car to cross the Start/Finish Line ONCE without serving the Penalty; crossing the Line again results in instant disqualification. THIS MUST BE FIXED IN FUTURE INCARNATIONS OF THE GAME. 8.) Also concerning Stop-Go Penalties, if a car has damage, the player should be given the option of either repairing the damage first and serving the Penalty on the next lap, or serving the Penalty first and repairing the damage later. To always force the player to serve the Stop-Go Penalty when a car has significant damage (such as a missing wing) is in essence a double penalty, because being forced to make another lap before fixing the damage could very well result in the player being forced to drop out of the race due to severe damage. 9.) Similarly, if a player has been assigned a Stop-Go Penalty and is extremely low of fuel when coming to Pit Lane, the player should be given the option to either refuel or serve the Penalty. To always force the player to serve the Penalty first can result in the player being forced to drop out of the race due to lack of fuel on the ensuing lap. 10.) History Mode - Perhaps unlockable, allow players to race in versions of F1 cars from the 1950s to the present, on courses which have previously hosted F1 races (Adelaide, Detroit, etc.). 11.) Periodic radio updates on the points-paying positions would be helpful, as it is not always feasible to safely watch the World Feed information at the bottom of the screen. 12.) Start each race on the warm-up lap, and force players to correctly find their grid position for the Standing Start. (This may best be used only in Grand Prix mode.) 13.) Provide a separate 'Map' option, which will allow players to scrutinize detailed course maps. This would be especially beneficial for visual learners. 14.) Car set-ups should include an option to adjust the maximum angle the front wheels can turn. This would be a great help in cornering, especially if the turn angle can be maximized on tight technical courses such as Monaco. 15.) Players should have the option to save car set-ups for each circuit. This would save the time and paper of writing down set-ups (or printing them from the Internet) and manually entering in set-ups for each race at each venue. ============================================== THANKS Thank you to Minesweeper for allowing me to specifically mention his Gran Turismo 3 A-spec Tuning Guide, to ViperMask for his pointer to ARCOR, and to Not Me for his insight on the bump stop. ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== WRAP-UP The official FIA Web site (http://www.fia.com/) has a lot of good information pertaining to F1 racing, including the current season's race schedule, rules and regulations, and links to the official Web sites of most of the courses used. The FIA Web site is available in both French and English. I also strongly suggest visiting Formula1.com (http://www.formula1.com/) for F1 news and race information. This is a FAR more interactive site than the FIA site, including games, Flash-based virtual laps of each circuit, team and driver information, extensive cross-linking between articles, screensavers, quizzes, and much more. ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== CONTACT INFORMATION For questions, rants, raves, comments of appreciation, etc., or to be added to my e-mail list for updates to this driving guide, please contact me at: FEATHER7@IX.NETCOM.COM; also, if you have enjoyed this guide and feel that it has been helpful to you, I would certainly appreciate a small donation via PayPal (http://www.paypal.com/) using the above e-mail address. To find the latest version of this and all my other PSX/PS2 game guides, please visit FeatherGuides (http://www.angelcities.com/members/feathersites/). The latest version will always be posted at FeatherGuides, while other Web sites may lag behind by several days in their regularly-scheduled posting updates. ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== ======================================================================= Wolf Feather Jamie Stafford ======================================================================= Just as there are many parts needed to make a human a human, there's a remarkable number of things needed to make an individual what they are. - Major Kusanagi, _Ghost in the Shell_ ======================================================================= What isn't remembered never happened. - _Serial Experiments Lain_ =======================================================================