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The Wild Beyond the Witchlight - everything you need to know about the Dungeons & Dragons adventure

The Wild Beyond the Witchlight
(Image credit: Wizards of the Coast)

The Wild Beyond the Witchlight might be the weirdest Dungeons and Dragons adventure yet. Featuring snails you can ride like horses, a realm of fairies, hare-people, and a Disneyland-esque carnival that's home to the creepiest damn clown we've ever seen, it promises a tale of "wicked whimsy" for entry-level characters.

That's because The Wild Beyond the Witchlight is D&D's first official trip to a parallel world known as the Feywild. (Think the Upside Down from Stranger Things, only nicer.) New races and backgrounds are also making an appearance, so there's plenty to get your teeth into if you want a fresh challenge.

Should you get The Wild Beyond the Witchlight? Does it deserve a place alongside the best Dungeons & Dragons books? More importantly, is the story any good? We've got all the details below, including discounts on the adventure and its accessories.

The Wild Beyond the Witchlight - what to expect

The Wild Beyond the Witchlight

(Image credit: Wizards of the Coast)

What is The Wild Beyond the Witchlight about?

The Wild Beyond the Witchlight is a full-length adventure designed to take players from levels 1-8. Featuring D&D's first official adventure set in the Feywild (a counterpoint to the nightmare dimension of Van Richten's Guide to Ravenloft or Curse of Strahd Revamped), it feels like a cross between between the Fable video game series and Alice in Wonderland. 

Although that makes it a good fit for anyone wanting something more lighthearted, this quest still has teeth. Occasionally veering into creepy territory despite its colorful aesthetic, The Wild Beyond the Witchlight is best described as a grim fairy tale.

"After all," project lead Chris Perkins said when we interviewed him about the book, "fairy tales are as much cautionary tales as they are escapism."

The Wild Beyond the Witchlight

(Image credit: Wizards of the Coast)

It might not seem that way at first; things kick off with a enchanted carnival that springs out of nowhere with rides to delight players. However, this is just the gateway to something bigger. More specifically, the carnival leads to a 'Domain of Delight' called Prismeer that's been taken over by a group of hags. Your job is to liberate the kingdom before it falls into ruin.

This will be easier said than done; as we mentioned in our The Wild Beyond the Witchlight preview, Prismeer is a place where emotions can twist the world around you. That results in some very strange and dangerous scenarios. 

Intriguingly, violence isn't essential to complete this quest; non-combat options are available for all encounters.

Are there new races in The Wild Beyond the Witchlight?

No matter how you choose to play, you'll be able to take advantage of new character types during your adventure - this book introduced fairies and the rabbit-like harengon to Dungeons & Dragons.

  • Harengon: Previously known as 'rabbitfolk', these creatures boast unique dexterity saves and can bounce great distances without provoking opportunity attacks.
  • Fairies: Besides being able to fly, fairies are able to cast spells that enlarge or reduce something in size once per day - perfect for squeezing into small spaces.

New backgrounds for The Wild Beyond the Witchlight

Along with those new races and numerous traits, The Wild Beyond the Witchlight features previously unseen backgrounds for you to try. Want to tie your character into the Feywild or the Witchlight Carnival itself? No problem. Here are the two different options:

  • The Feylost: These characters grew up in the Feywild and were fundamentally changed by it. Mechanics include unusual 'Fey Marks' that set your character apart and creatures that visit you in your dreams.  
  • Witchlight Hand: If you choose this background, your character has worked in the Witchlight Carnival for years. You also gain a companion that works at the fair and enriches your experience there.

The Wild Beyond the Witchlight - alternate covers

The Wild Beyond the Witchlight

(Image credit: Wizards of the Coast)

Is there an alternate cover for The Wild Beyond the Witchlight? Yes, and it's by artist and longtime D&D collaborator Hydro74. Featuring a displacer beast kitten called Star on the front and a special item from the campaign on the back, the book's design and soft-touch finish help it stand out from the normal version.

Although it's meant to be an in-store exclusive that you'll only get from brick-and-mortar game shops, it's still possible to find a copy online if you know where to look. We've not seen it at any US retailers yet beyond an absurdly overpriced Amazon listing (opens in new tab), but UK readers can grab it in Waterstones (opens in new tab).

The Wild Beyond the Witchlight - accessories

The Witchlight Carnival Dice & Miscellany

(Image credit: Wizards of the Coast)

A new set of dice and accessories were released alongside The Wild Beyond the Witchlight. Dubbed 'The Witchlight Carnival Dice & Miscellany', this pack includes premium dice, reference cards, a double-sided map of the carnival itself, and a felt-lined box you can use as dice trays. While it's a little pricey, those physical props should be handy for anyone running the carnival section of the campaign.

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The Witchlight Carnival Dice & Miscellany | $30 $26.99 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
This set includes 11 premium dice, a felt-lined box that can double as a pair of dice trays, and a foldout map with the Witchlight Carnival on one side and concept art on the other. 19 double-sided reference cards also come with the set. These contain info with illustrations of characters, creatures, games, and other features players will find at the carnival.

The Wild Beyond the Witchlight - today's best deals

More Dungeons & Dragons

If you want more D&D, be sure to visit our guides below. They'll run you through the basics, including how to find a game and ways to play online. 

You can also check out our Dungeons and Dragons Starter Set review if you want an introduction to one of the best tabletop RPGs around.


Looking for some recommendations beyond the best tabletop RPGs? Don't forget to check out the best board games, board games for adults, board games for 2 players, and the best cooperative board games.

Benjamin Abbott
Benjamin Abbott

As the site's Tabletop & Merch Editor, you'll find my grubby paws on everything from board game reviews to Lego buying guides. I have been writing about games in one form or another since 2012 and can normally be found cackling over some evil plan I've cooked up for my group's next Dungeons & Dragons campaign.