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Best EPOS Sennheiser headsets for gaming 2022: Incredible sound for games made by audio purists

Sennheiser gaming headset guide
(Image credit: Future/EPOS | Sennheiser)

Considering a Sennheiser headset for gaming in 2022? A wise move, particularly if you're after some top-quality game audio. Built on Sennheiser's premium audio pedigree and its long history in quality sound, Sennheiser gaming headsets are some of the most qualified to use the mantle of 'superior gaming audio'. 

First off there is a key bit of housekeeping to make you aware of: Sennheiser headsets will now be sold under the EPOS brand name. After a de-merger in 2020 (explained here), the products were sold under the 'EPOS | Sennheiser' mantle, but now, if you're looking for a Sennheiser gaming headset, you'll actually be purchasing an EPOS gaming headset in the end. Do not let this put you off in any way, however: the Sennheiser quality and reputation remain, and is enhanced through EPOS's input. As a result, some of these models are still - and will become - some of the best gaming headsets.

Anyway, while Sennheiser gaming headsets - and EPOS gaming headsets, for that matter, now - are not the flashiest or most feature-filled products on the market they benefit from being made by and for audio purists who want gaming audio execution matched by none. The design and build oozes quality, too; what's the point of great sound if you can't be comfortable wearing the headset? Plus, they'll last for ages with that solid design and build, their audio quality is timeless, and with some amazing wireless entries to complement wired, multi-device headsets, there's a healthy range to pick from.

The best Sennheiser headsets for gaming 2022

1. EPOS | Sennheiser GSP 370

The best Sennheiser gaming headset overall

Specifications

Acoustic design: Semi-open back; around ear
Cable length: wireless; 1.5m charging cable
Weight: 9.9oz
Compatibility: PS5, PS4, PC, Mac

Reasons to buy

+
Some of the best game audio ever
+
Incredible battery life
+
Sennheiser quality through and through

Reasons to avoid

-
'Only' compatible with PS5, PS4, PC, and Mac

The Sennheiser GSP 370 headset is the best I have reviewed on GamesRadar+ bar none. The quality is here in absolute bucketloads, and it's a true aligning of the 'headset factor' stars; every element that makes up a premium device combines in the GSP 370 Sennheiser gaming headset. 

In short, and starting from the top: the sound quality is pure Sennheiser goodness of the highest order, detailed, clear, rich, and multi-leveled; the build quality and design is solid, robust and a great weight for a wireless headset meant to be worn for hours at a time, with perfectly-fitting earcups that actually block out exterior noise by design; the Bluetooth connectivity is reliable and solid; and the battery life is genuinely incredible (I clocked it at nearly 100-hours). It's just a shame its compatibility doesn't stretch beyond PC, Mac, and PS4. 

The price tag is very much in the premium headset range, though, which means it's one to save up for - but it's not unusual to see other premium headsets comfortably above three figures (think of the best Razer headsets (opens in new tab), for example). However, the Sennheiser GSP 370 headset goes pretty much the whole way to justify this price point and if you get it, you will not look back. Seriously, if, you're looking for one of the best PS4 headsets or best PS5 headsets measured by almost any metric, then you should go for the GSP 370s.

2. EPOS | Sennheiser GSP 300

The best value Sennheiser headset

Specifications

Acoustic design: Closed-acoustic, over-ear
Cable length: 2m
Weight: 10.2oz
Compatibility: PS4, Xbox One, Switch, PC, Mobile, Mac

Reasons to buy

+
Sennheiser-quality audio
+
Excellently clear mic
+
Comfy
+
Affordable (for Sennheiser)

Reasons to avoid

-
No chat/game audio balancer
-
Limited features
-
Design is a bit loose/wobbly

The GSP 300 headset is a great starting point for those looking to get into Sennheiser gaming headsets - but one that can also stand in its own right given the quality, and value in particular, that it offers. As I said in my review (opens in new tab), "getting a Sennheiser-quality headset like this, at this price point, and with this device-versatility, is an excellent proposition and one that is easy to recommend".

Thus, if you're really keen to get some Sennheiser audio quality into your setup but can't stretch to the larger price tags of the more premium headsets, then the GSP 300 is the right choice. Its compatibility with every device is a major plus, while it retains the Sennheiser excellence in audio (detailed sound, excellent surround/directional accuracy, and great overall richness). Its microphone is good too, though this won't be great for mobile players or for the commute as the mic is non-detachable and a little wobbly on the design front. The latter being a little weak point on the headset overall, actually, as it feels a bit wobbly in the hands. 

In an ideal world, it'd be nice to have some more  features, but this is a more entry-to-mid range headset, and the sheer bang for buck value cannot be denied nonetheless.

3. EPOS | Sennheiser GSP 500

A premium Sennheiser headset with a best-in-class mic

Specifications

Acoustic design: Around-ear
Cable length: 1.5m
Weight: 12.6oz
Compatibility: PS4, Xbox One, Switch, PC, Mobile, Mac

Reasons to buy

+
Great mic
+
Excellent design and build

Reasons to avoid

-
Bass is a bit thin

While it's not massively dissimilar to the GSP 300 headset above, the GSP 500 does manage to distinguish itself in some key areas. First, the microphone is excellent. Really excellent. As soon as I started using it, my teammates commented on the quality and clarity of it. 

On that note, the presentation of teammates' voice audio is also great in the GSP 500s and better than the 300s overall - voices can be difficult for gaming headsets to master, but the GSP 500 is one of the best Sennheiser gaming headsets for this. 

The design is similar to the 300s, sure, but the build quality is also great and worthy of the price tag; it's excellently solid, robust, and clamps to your head and ears incredibly comfortably. Even the suede-y ear cups are lovely. And on top of that, you of course get premium Sennheiser audio quality to go with it.

The downside? The bass is a little lacking, which is a shame, but also and just about a forgivable compromise given the quality elsewhere. You'll also be able to adapt, personalize, and enhance the GSP 500s if you use the headset in combination with one of the external sound cards available - the GSX 1200 Pro (opens in new tab), particularly, and the new EPOS | Sennheiser GSX 300 (opens in new tab) (both only compatible with PC and Mac).

One of the best wired EPOS | Sennheiser sets

Specifications

Acoustic design: Open back; over ear
Cable length: 1.8m / 5.9ft
Drivers: TriForce Titanium 50mm
Weight: 9.2oz / 262g
Compatibility: PC, PS4, Xbox One, Mac, Mobile

Reasons to buy

+
Spacious, natural audio
+
Luxurious looks
+
Smart detachable mic design

Reasons to avoid

-
Is in the same category pf price as wireless sets

Once upon a time, Sennheiser made excellent headsets for gaming that looked more sophisticated than their RGB-daubed cousins and sounded like they’d been made by a long-established pro audio company - funny, that. Then EPOS took over those lines and refreshed them with an eye on repositioning them juuust slightly more towards the lifestyle market. 

A worthy successor to Sennheiser’s GAME ONE in the wired open-backed market - but that’s a specific niche.

Sennheiser EPOS H6Pro review

The H6PRO is part of that push - mature looks, premium price, and an open-backed design that’ll get audiophiles nodding. In pure, naked audio terms the old Senny GAME ONE still sounds better, but despite a darker voicing these H6PROs are natural and flat, with a tight and unexaggerated bass response.

They are, you’ll notice, both $180 / £150 and wired. That means they’re catering to a specific audience. A hybrid of audiophile and all-out gamer who wants that breezy sound and RGB-free look, but also wants a meaty microphone for Discord. 

This is an exceptionally light model for the spec - just 322g. As such, it’s not carrying the timber most high-end headsets do. You’ll find no needless brushed steel accents here. Just lightweight plastics and soft cloth cushions around an aluminium band. Neat features like the detachable mic and its swappable magnetised cover do impress, and this is good wireless headset money.

Read more: Sennheiser EPOS H6Pro review

5. EPOS | Sennheiser GSP 670

The best premium Sennheiser headset

Specifications

Acoustic design: Around-ear
Cable length: Wireless
Weight: 14oz / 398g
Compatibility: PC, PS4

Reasons to buy

+
Truly brilliant sound quality
+
Exquisite range of audio and detail
+
Excellent design and fit
+
Quality mic

Reasons to avoid

-
Incredibly expensive
-
No designated chat/in-game audio balancer

Although the GSP 370s make it somewhat hard to truly, truly go for the more expensive 670, if you're after supreme Sennheiser quality, then this is the headset for you. Its performance across games of any stripe, as well as media, is supreme. In any game, it doesn't matter what's going on or what the scenario or surroundings are, the GSP 670s will give you world-beating audio clarity, depth, breadth, and detail.

The price tag is a bit of a stumbling point - again, particularly when taking the 370s into consideration. However, if there is ever a sale price or discount (like our price-finding software will display here) then this would be a great acquisition. The lack of that killer feature, balancing between chat and in-game audio, is a bit of a pain on PS4, but on PC can be overcome easily enough. 

All in, the fact remains that the GSP 670 is one of the best Sennheiser gaming headsets - and a seriously excellent gaming headset, period.

EPOS GTW 270

(Image credit: EPOS)

6. EPOS GTW 270 Hybrid earbuds

The best Sennheiser and EPOS gaming earbuds

Specifications

Battery life: 20 hours
Connection: Low-latency Bluetooth
Noise cancelling: No (Noise isolating instead)
Weight: 384g (total package weight)
Compatibility: Nintendo Switch, PS5, PS4, PC, Mobile
Mic: Yes; built-in, dual microphone

Reasons to buy

+
Impressive sound 
+
Versatile connectivity 
+
Comfortable fit 
+
Premium feel
+
Excellent battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
Microphone won’t work with dongle 

The EPOS GTW 70 Hybrid wireless gaming earbuds focus on offering a high-end audio experience for Switch and mobile gaming. 

These earbuds boast the sort of audio quality you’d expect from the team at EPOS, whose hardware is on our top gaming headsets list, with deep bass, rich mid-tones, and fantastic directional audio making them as impressive playing games on your Switch or PS5 as they are listening to your favourite tunes through your phone. Plus, a charging case comes with the GTW 70 Hybrid that can give the earbuds up to a total of 20 hours of battery life.

They come with a USB-C dongle, allowing you to plug them into your Nintendo Switch and PS5, as well as a cable that will allow you to plug the dongle into a PS4, for example. On top of that, they also support Bluetooth, so you can sync them with any device that supports it.

It's worth noting that while they do come with an in-built microphone, this only works when you’re connected through Bluetooth - not the USB-C dongle. That’s because the dongle is focused on providing low-latency audio, so there is minimal disruption between what’s happening in your game and what you’re hearing. However, it does mean that you won’t be able to communicate with team-mates online. 

Read more: EPOS GTW 270 Hybrid 70 review

A solid mid-entry EPOS gaming headset with Sennheiser traits

Specifications

Acoustic design: Closed back
Cable length: 2m
Weight: 10oz (283g)
Compatibility: PC, PlayStation, Xbox, Switch, Mac, Mobile

Reasons to buy

+
Multi-platform
+
Grown-up looks
+
Great stereo spread

Reasons to avoid

-
Finish feels a bit plasticky for the price
-
Not GSP-grade audio

If you never bought a Sennheiser gaming headset but watched slightly perplexed as the pro audio company released collab models with Epos and then receded entirely, leaving the latter to produce revised versions of its existing range, you’ve probably got some questions.

First and foremost: Epos hasn’t magically squeezed a top-end GSP headset into a lower price point. The H3s are wired and connect via either separate audio and mic 3.5mm jacks, or a combined 3.5mm input for mobile devices. 

Controls are limited to a mic mute on the boom arm and a volume dial on the earcup, and that befits a clean, black and white aesthetic that feels pleasingly grown-up for the gaming market. There’s plenty of cushioning around the earcups, and that helps counteract a strong clamping force. It does feel cheaper than its price point though, due to heavy use of plastic. 

In audio terms it’s very much a closed-back setup - the earcups sit very snug, so the drivers can pump out the low end in a sealed chamber and deliver some power, while highs aren’t fighting room noise. There’s more artifice here than in Senny’s exceptionally clean-sounding GSPs, but then it is a cheaper model. We love the stereo spread though - games really benefit from its spacious sound stage, and if you play a lot of online shooters that can yield some advantages. 

Read more: EPOS H3 review

A brilliant all rounder

Specifications

Acoustic design: Closed-acoustic, over ear
Cable length: 9.8ft / 3m
Weight: 10.5oz / 300g
Compatibility: PC, PS4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, mobile

Reasons to buy

+
Comfy
+
Built to last
+
Tight, clear sound

Reasons to avoid

-
Lacking in bass

The Game Zero headset sits in that comfortable middle ground between the GSP 300 and the GSP 370, offering another excellent mid-range option for people looking to spend a little more cash overall on a wired, traditional headset. They retain the same excellent over-ear closed-back design, but with a slightly more "classic" gamer aesthetic overall. Hints of red break up the usual matte black finish, although they’re still on point with the Sennheiser design and subsequently still look the business.

Long, drawn-out gaming sessions aren’t a hassle at all with these thanks to their generously padded, well-spaced ear cups and they present an overall build that’s solid and definitely built to last.

Performance-wise, the Game Zero is superbly clear sounding, with the closed-back design offering some excellent passive isolation and the mic being close to perfect as well. Some might find these a little lacking on the bass side, however, which unfortunately limits them slightly for people looking for that general use, gaming plus music headset.

Read more: EPOS | Sennheiser Game Zero review

A premium audio Sennheiser headset

Specifications

Acoustic design: Around ear
Cable length: 9.8ft / 3m
Weight: 10.5oz / 300g
Compatibility: PC, PS4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, mobile

Reasons to buy

+
Powerful audio quality
+
Comfortable design
+
Wide compatibility

Reasons to avoid

-
Lacking features expected at this price point

It's easy to believe that the Game One headset comes from a brand with headphones in music studios across the world. Sennheiser is well known for making incredibly well-balanced headsets capable of reproducing audio exactly how it was meant to be heard. The same is true for this Sennheiser gaming headset.

From raging soundtracks to the incredibly detailed soundscapes of wide-open spaces, the audio coming through these incredibly comfortable velour cups is clear and detailed, across all ranges. That makes the Game Ones perfect for those looking for premium audio in their games and their music. However, it's a little disappointing that there's no noise cancellation whatsoever here, and a limited mic that may feel frustrating once you've put this much money on the table. 

That stripped back approach does allow for that boosted audio quality, however, a design ethos that seems to have made its way to the physical build on the headset itself. There are no strobing RGB effects here, or futuristic shapes and effects - just a simple open back black headset with a striking red almost chrome accent running through it. It's a subtle look, for sure, but one that music lovers will feel just as comfortable donning outside the house as well. 

Read more: EPOS | Sennheiser Game One review

A king of comfort and audio roundness - for a price

Specifications

Acoustic design: Around ear
Cable length: 8.2ft / 2.5m
Weight: 13.9oz / 395g
Compatibility: PC, PS4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, mobile

Reasons to buy

+
Adjustable headband tension
+
Top quality materials
+
Powerful sound
+
Restrained look

Reasons to avoid

-
Weak mic
-
3.5mm split cable

Sennheiser has 70 years of skin in the game when it comes to delivering top-notch audio, and the company’s foray into gaming headsets is testament to that experience. The GSP 600 slots in just below the 670 in their hierarchy and certainly isn’t cheap, but it’s full of materials and finishes that make you feel like you’re getting the VIP treatment. The satisfying weight to the volume dial on the right earcup, and the ‘click’ of the mic arm when it mutes - well, they’re basically worth the money alone. 

It’s not terribly forward-thinking, offering a braided cable with only 3.5mm split cables and no inline remote, but put up with that and you get a fantastic stereo spread and long-term comfort thanks to a nifty adjustable headband tension system.

Read more: Sennheiser GSP 600 review

Are Sennheiser and EPOS the same?

In a way, yes. But in another way, no. There's a little bit of history between the brand names and how it's all come to be under just the EPOS name now, but the bottom line is that Sennheiser's gaming audio has been folded into EPOS now - and the pedigree remains there.

Sennheiser's gaming audio division became one with EPOS back in 2020, and this partnership, or blending, first went under the mantle of 'EPOS | Sennheiser'. This felt like softening the transition, so to speak, but now the brand is totally known as EPOS - and all new lines are under this name. Older Sennheiser products might still be available to purchase at retailers, or might have had a soft refresh with the EPOS name added, but the fact remains that the products still have that Sennheiser pedigree, but also have the forward-looking and modern approach of EPOS injected into them too.

If you're interested in a headset from a top brand and want to continue your research then you should check out our Razer headset (opens in new tab)guide. Immediately.

I'm the Commissioning Editor for Hardware at GamesRadar+ and have been here since late 2018. I'm also a writer on games and have had work published over the last five years or so at the likes of Eurogamer, RPS, PCGN, and more. Day to day, I take care of a whole host of gaming tech reviews, buying guides, and news and deals content that pops up across GamesRadar+. I'm also a qualified landscape and garden designer, so I do that in my spare time. I'm also an expert on the virtual landscapes and environments of games and love to write about them too, including in an upcoming book on the topic!