50 Movies That Would Be Ruined By Modern Technology

Technology: the surest way to destroy plots

Walk The Line (2005)

The Movie: The rise, fall and redemption of the Man In Black himself, Johnny Cash.

The Tech: Twitter.

If there’s one thing Twitter does better than any other social network, it’s obliterating the mystique of previously interesting celebrities.

If Johnny Cash had been endlessly tweeting nonsense after an amphetamine binge, would his persona have been anywhere near as iconic?

Back To The Future (1985)

The Movie: An irreverent scientist and his teenage accomplice travel through time.

The Tech: Speed Cameras.

Gunning it to 88 miles per hour in a city centre?

In the eyes of the law, Doc Brown and Marty are little more than irresponsible criminals, flouting the rules of the road for their own entertainment.

Once they returned from the 1950s, they’d have had some serious fines to pay.

Say Anything (1989)

The Movie: High school underachiever Lloyd desperately attempts to win the affects of Diane before she has to move abroad to study.

The Tech:
iPod.

The famous scene where John Cusack hold aloft his boombox just wouldn’t have the same impact with an iPod. Those things just don’t have the range of a good old-fashioned ghetto blaster.

The Notebook (2004)

The Movie: The forbidden love between a poor lad and a rich girl is retold via a touching story read from a notebook.

The Tech:
Memory stick.

There’s nothing that says I love you like the cool micro-chipped efficiency of a memory stick. All right, maybe there is.

The Aristocats (1970)

The Movie: A family of posh cats are kidnapped by a butler who is intent on getting his hands on a fortune.

The Tech: Dubstep.

The charming soundtrack of The Aristocats could have been thoroughly decimated by a dubstep remix.

Skrillex has a lot more to answer for than terrible hair.

Alive (1993)

The Movie: The survivors of a plane crash have to make some tough decisions to survive.

The Tech: Fast food.

There wouldn’t be any need to chow down on the charred remains of your fellow ex-passengers if there was a handy fast food joint nearby, which there normally is in these heady days of capitalist opportunity for all.

A nice juicy burger or a piece of fried chicken really hits the spot after plummeting out of the skies into the side of a mountain.

Rosemary's Baby (1968)

The Movie: When a young woman falls pregnant, she begins to suspect that all is not right with her unborn child.

The Tech:
Ultrasound.

There’s nothing quite like an ultrasound for finding out if your child is the antichrist or not.

Those horns are easy to spot in even the fuzziest print-out.

And let’s be honest here, you’d want to know if you were carrying the spawn of satan.

What are the nutritional requirements of such a child, for starters?

Marley And Me (2008)

The Movie: A couple’s relationship becomes intrinsically linked with their troublesome dog.

The Tech: Mammal cloning.

When the dog dies (sorry, spoiler), all the heartache of his grieving family could be solved at a stroke by creating a clone of him.

You could have an endless supply of Marleys in fact, thus preventing any pet-based upset ever again.

And if the Grogans can't face owning another dog, we've got a sheep they can buy instead.

Her name's Dolly and she's an immortal.

Sommersby (1993)

The Movie: A veteran of the American civil war returns home a changed man – so much so that his wife doubts if he is actually her husband at all.

The Tech:
DNA testing.

A quick swab of the gob, and all that confusion could have been swept away.

It’s easy when you know how, it really is. Just ask Jeremy Kyle.

Desk Set (1957)

The Movie: The employees of a reference library fear for their jobs when their company decides to bring in computers.

The Tech: The Internet.

A reference library you say? The very thought!

The only reference library anyone needs nowadays is the Internet, what with its access to the entirety of humanity’s knowledge at the click of a button and all.

Reference library, pah!

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