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PS5 patent reveals more about how it will let you "jump right into whatever you like"

(Image credit: Future)

A new patent shows how PS5 (opens in new tab) will let you launch into specific parts of games to play your favorite activities as fast as loading up the next episode of The Witcher on Netflix (opens in new tab).

The United States Patent application (opens in new tab) was first filed back in September 2018 but was only published last week. Its title of "Dynamic Interfaces for Launching Direct Gameplay" isn't catchy, but it does sum up the idea well: on top of allowing you to load up a game the usual way, a theoretical game console's theoretical user interface could also automatically present several "templates" for jumping straight to in-game activities.

In a game like Call of Duty: Modern Warfare (opens in new tab), that could mean loading into the latest mission of the campaign or matchmaking for Warzone from the home screen, without any need for the usual series of loading and splash screens. You'd just go to the Modern Warfare section of the PS5 UI, select the activity you want, and get to it.

You can already accomplish some of that on PS4 by suspending the game right where you want to play next, but this would allow you to quickly jump into multiple parts of the game even if you didn't leave off there last time, or if you hadn't played in a while.

The patent doesn't mention PS5 but it lines up neatly with Sony's push to mercilessly exterminate any wait time between you and playing your games - and specifically with comments Cerny made last year about PS5 letting you "jump right into whatever you like" (opens in new tab). The SSD technology and expanded system bandwidth that Mark Cerny outlined in his recent PS5 tech deep dive (opens in new tab) could also help power this new interface innovation.

See what you could be playing with minimal wait times (aside from the wait for them to actually come out) in our guide to upcoming PS5 games (opens in new tab).

I got a BA in journalism from Central Michigan University - though the best education I received there was from CM Life, its student-run newspaper. Long before that, I started pursuing my degree in video games by bugging my older brother to let me play Zelda on the Super Nintendo. I've previously been a news intern for GameSpot, a news writer for CVG, and now I'm a staff writer here at GamesRadar.