Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart has a 60 FPS mode on PS5

(Image credit: Insomniac Games)

Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart will give players an option play through at 60 FPS, Insomniac Games has confirmed.

The developers confirmed the detail in an interview with Weekly Famitus. For the Ratchet fans out there who don't speak Japanese, the studio also kindly shared the information in English on its official Twitter account.

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Since Insomniac is framing Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart's 60 FPS support as an option, that implies there will be other options to choose as well. That will likely include a mode that prioritizes visual detail and clarity over frame rate, as is the case for some PS4 Pro games. Some next-gen games are also promising support for 120 FPS or higher, so it's possible Rift Apart will follow suit with an option for that as well.

Whatever mode you'll play on, the power of PS5 (opens in new tab) will help you appreciate fine new details like the way shrubbery grows on your enemies once they fall victim to the Topiary Sprinkler.

"My favourite part about the weapon is that now that we have all this extra power and fidelity of 4K graphics on the PS5, you can make it actually feel like topiary sculptures, because topiaries have these tiny, little, detailed leaves that aren't just a flat mesh," game director Mike Daly told us in a new Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart interview (opens in new tab)

The Ratchet & Clank series has always been a visual showcase for PlayStation consoles, pushing refinements like impressive weapon effects and fur physics that make you want to pet Ratchet's big lombax ears so bad. The results were just as impressive when Insomniac went for a more realistic style with Spider-Man PS4 (opens in new tab), and it looks like Spider-Man: Miles Morales (opens in new tab) will somehow be even prettier when it hits PS5.

Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart is easily one of the titles we're most excited about in our big list of upcoming PS5 games (opens in new tab).

I got a BA in journalism from Central Michigan University - though the best education I received there was from CM Life, its student-run newspaper. Long before that, I started pursuing my degree in video games by bugging my older brother to let me play Zelda on the Super Nintendo. I've previously been a news intern for GameSpot, a news writer for CVG, and now I'm a staff writer here at GamesRadar.