Naughty Dog is shutting down multiplayer servers for Uncharted 2, Uncharted 3, and The Last of Us on PS3 later this year

Online multiplayer modes for some of the most successful third person action games of the last generation will become unplayable later this year. Naughty Dog is shutting down servers for Uncharted 2 (opens in new tab), Uncharted 3 (opens in new tab), and The Last of Us (opens in new tab) on PS3 in September.

Naughty Dog (opens in new tab) announced that the servers would be shut down at 5 pm PST on September 3, marking an end for the odd multiplayer modes for three incredible single player adventures. You'll still be able to play The Last of Us and Uncharted 4 (opens in new tab) online on PS4, but there won't be an official way to play the two Uncharted sequels online at the end of the year. 

"It’s bittersweet to say the least," said Naughty dog senior communications manager Scott Lowe in a statement on the studio's official site. "Uncharted and The Last of Us multiplayer on the PS3 are defining entries in Naughty Dog’s history and we’ve been honored to support the passionate communities that have grown around them for almost a decade. We have so many fond memories from playing alongside you throughout the years."

Uncharted: The Nathan Drake Collection (opens in new tab), which includes the first three Uncharted games, didn't bring the online modes to PS4 as Naughty Dog didn't want to fracture the active PS3 community (opens in new tab) which will no longer be active come September. 

The Jak and Daxter developers are making all multiplayer downloadable content free on PS3 to make the hit less substantial for those still invested in those versions of each game. You can get all gameplay and cosmetic content on the PlayStation Store (opens in new tab) for free starting today. 

Feeling nostalgic over the news? Check out the inside story of Uncharted: Drake’s Fortune (opens in new tab).

Freelance Writer

Aron writes for Upcomer covering the video games and eSports industries in-depth. He was previously a freelancer whose work appeared in Wired, Rolling Stone, Washington Post, and GamesRadar, among others.