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Best Razer streaming gear 2022: look and sound your best with Team Green

Razer Key Light
(Image credit: Future / Alex Berry)

As one of the most popular gamer-centric brands, Razer streaming gear has certainly blossomed over the years into rivaling companies such as Elgato and Logitech with options perfect for any streaming setup. With more options than ever for each facet of the modern Twitch streamer / YouTuber's arsenal, this is the best Razer streaming gear on the market right now. 

It isn't just headsets and microphones nowadays, as Razer has extended its foray into the fields of audio mixing desks and key lights, too. The company's commitment to high-quality construction can be found in each of these models below, as while usually a little more expensive, potentially even boutique, you know you're getting a product that's built to last. 

After all, you want to be captured in the highest quality possible, and we've found that Razer streaming gear generally goes a good job of living up to this mantle. We've had our hands on many of these devices personally, and can tell you from experience the kind of user experience you can expect in 2022. 

The best Razer streaming gear 2022

Razer Kiyo

A brilliant and versatile camera

Specifications

Display resolution: 1080p
Recording resolution: 1080p 30fps, 720p 60fps
FOV: 90 degrees
Special features: Built-in ring light

Reasons to buy

+
Ring light is immensely useful and flexible
+
Good saturation
+
Flexible recording options

Reasons to avoid

-
Superseded by the Razer Kiyo Pro

Stylish in design and excellent in its function, the Razer Kiyo is a brilliant webcam for streaming - but also for every day and work use too. 

What's immediately noticeable on the Kiyo is its built-in light ring. This is so good in fact, that it makes the camera a contender for best ring light going too - if you see what we mean. Anyway, good lighting is key to any stream, amateur or pro, so having a built-in light source in your webcam is incredibly useful and can make it great for recording in any lighting situations even pitch black. The light's intensity is easily adjusted by spinning the exterior dial around, giving a range of control over how you appear, and what's best for your environment. Speaking of what's best for you, it even comes in a range of familiar Razercolours - including quartz pink!

In terms of the actual, and all-important camera itself, the Razer Kiyo has a 1080p sensor that boasts excellent quality. It will capture pictures with great detail, sharpness, and clarity, and will do so quickly with an adept autofocus function. Specifically, in terms of what it can do, it can record at 1080p and 30fps or at 720p in 60fps, allowing flexibility and versatility. Combine all that with the companion app, Synapse, enabling some adjustment to levels and color and presentation to the Razer Kiyo's image, which is yet another string to its bow. All in this is an excellent bit of kit for any PC-bound communication generally, and a particularly brilliant one for streaming. I have one of these and I can't recommend it enough.

Razer Seiren X

A sleek, compact and top-performing microphone

Specifications

Voltage: 5V
Polar patterns: Super-cardioid
Connectivity: USB
Frequency response: 20Hz-20,000Hz
Features: built-in shock mount, mute button, zero-latency 3.5 mm headphone monitoring port

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent, portable design
+
Brilliant cardioid performance
+
Plug-and-go setup

Reasons to avoid

-
No other polar patterns

The Razer Seiren X has a simple but elegant form factor and will neatly sit on your desk as a piece of desk furniture when not in use. Its obelisk form is compact and uncomplicated, perfectly-cylindrical, and flat-topped, its smooth shell only punctuated by the button for muting the microphone and the volume dial. 

Away from its excellent aesthetics and design though, the Seiren X has a built-in shock mount, and utilizes Razer’s fancy ‘super-cardioid’ pickup pattern, where sound is recorded at a tighter angle. Razer says this reduces unwanted background noise and allows you to deliver your voice loud and clear.

And the sound quality itself is excellent. From individual voice recordings for voice-overs to multiple people gathering around it for internet meetings and calls, it’s sound performance is excellent value and really oozes Razer's pedigree and qualities. This is great value for the performance and so we - and I, as I have one of these personally too - are happy to give this a solid recommendation to readers.

Razer Seiren Elite

The premium option for the professional streamer

Specifications

Voltage: 5V
Polar patterns: Cardioid
Connectivity: USB
Frequency response: 50Hz-20,000Hz
Features: Microphone windsdcreen, high-pass filter switch, digital/analog limiter, zero-latency 3.5 mm headphone monitoring port

Reasons to buy

+
Premium performance over the Seiren X
+
Excellent design quality
+
Can be mounted onto arms

Reasons to avoid

-
Significantly pricier than other Seiren models

This is the cream of the crop of Razert's streaming gear. If you can build your set up around the Seiren Elite then you'll be well on the way to having a professional streaming setup - or as near as one can get. It's also deceptively simple which means the Razer Seiren Elite is a very attractive, premium microphone.

The sleek, black capsule design not only means it's a great looking bit of kit and not an obtrusive bit of desk furniture, but it also ensures minimal electronic interference. Onboard the design, volume, gain, and mic mute controls sit in the design neatly and functionally simple and effective. It's also worth noting that the microphone's design enables it to be a great desktop mic, or one that can be more mobile, attached to a boom arm.

This microphone's clarity is ideal for streaming but also makes it ideal for recording at home, for work, or communicating online. A neat feature is the inbuilt high-pass filter. This cuts out unwanted low-frequency vibrations, like footsteps or machinery hums, ensuring only the cleanest recording signals are picked up, and at the other end a digital/analog limiter helps adjust your gains to prevent audio distortion, so you’ll always sound balanced and in control.

Getting all this in a premium package that also only requires a plug and play setup is an immensely attractive proposition for those looking to upgrade their streaming setup. The ability to simply plug it in a USB port, rather than messing around with external mixers and amplifiers, as some pro microphones require, is an enormous attraction, and make for a truly great streaming mic given its sound, audio and balancing qualities overall.

Razer Ripsaw HD

Stream on a budget, free from visual compromise

Specifications

Resolution: 1080p streaming; 4K passthrough
Frame rate: 60fps
Interface: USB 3.0
Works with: PC, PS4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch

Reasons to buy

+
4K 60fps passthrough
+
Easy, hardware-based audio mixing
+
Well priced

Reasons to avoid

-
Lacks dedicated streaming software
-
Lack of older console support

What the Razer Ripsaw HD can offer is a capture card that does 4K passthrough while streaming games in 1080p. This is brilliant, as you are very unlikely to find a true 4K capture card for the same price, and if you have a PS4 Pro or an Xbox One X in particular, the Razer Ripsaw HD is your best bet to scratch that high-res streaming itch. (Remember, for reference, the PS4 Pro's internal Share button and function will only record at a maximum of 1080p at 30fps.) A big plus point on top of this is that the Razer Ripsaw HD eliminates the hurdle of software-based audio mixing. You can mix audio, "hassle-free," using the hardwired mic and headphone jacks. 

Unfortunately, the Razer Ripsaw HD does not come with its own streaming software, which is a big down point in our eyes; a shame, considering how easy the actual unit is to use and sort out. Therefore, to stream in 1080p as advertised, you'll have to plump for a premium membership with XSplit or rely on the less-intuitive and slightly less-reliable, but free, Open Broadcasting Software (OBS). On top of that, unlike the original Razer Ripsaw (opens in new tab), this one doesn't support older consoles without a small collection of adapters. 

Overall, however, it's a stellar bit of kit to get into your setup and does punch well above its weight for its price tag. 

Razer's premium key light

Specifications

Colour: White 3000K - 7000K adjustable, RGB
Brightness: 2800 Lumens, adjustable from 0-100%
Connectivity: WiFi enabled
Dimensions: 360 mm x 260 mm (Light only), Min 553 mm / Max 1350 mm (Pole + Adapter + Table Clamp)
Weight: ~1600 g (Light only), ~760 g (Pole + Adapter + Table Clamp)

Reasons to buy

+
Super bright
+
Full RGB colour options
+
Great build quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive compared to competitors
-
Middling integrations

"You don’t need a better camera, you need better lighting" is the advice we see often shared with streamers looking to improve their production and Razer have stepped up to the plate with their solution, the Key Light Chroma. Sharing more than just a name with Elgato’s offering, the Razer Key Light Chroma looks eerily similar to its rival but shines when the lights come on.

In our testing, the all-metal body came across as very professional, and the included desk mounting arm was rock solid. With 2800 lumens of lighting power from its large, rounded rectangular panel the Razer Key Light Chroma also gave us more punch than you’re ever going to need. There’s a wide colour temperature range available, though fractionally less than Elgato’s Key Light, with step-less transitions from the toasty warm 3000K to icy cold blue 7000K. 

There’s a hidden trick behind the opaque white panel though: RGB. It is a Razer product after all. The Key Light Chroma offers a choice of 16.8 million colours and a suite of customisable lighting effects which really set this light apart from competitors and proved that in our testing. The brightness and saturation of the colours are strong and the creative potential this offers streamers is rather impressive.

All light functions are controllable via Razer Synapse on Windows or the Razer Streaming mobile app. While these apps do work perfectly fine for controlling basic functions, we found them to be a bit limited in terms of on the fly changes and full integration with your stream. There’s no Elgato Stream Deck or hotkey support available and connections to alert services like LumiaStream are extremely limited.

All of the Razer Key Light Chroma’s current weaknesses are software related but easily improved. Right now it’s a great option for creators looking to set up their look and stick with it but for those looking to be more dynamic it may be worth holding tight and tracking progress on the software side. Overall though, the Razer Key Light Chroma is a powerful, high-quality option.

Read more: Razer Key Light Chroma review

A premium audio mixer from Razer

Specifications

Inputs: 3.5mm, XLR
Phantom cower: Yes
Audio channels: 4

Reasons to buy

+
Easy to take control of all your audio
+
Pleasing build quality
+
XLR microphone support

Reasons to avoid

-
Relies on Windows audio mixing
-
Middling customisation
-
Expensive compared to rivals

Holding the crown of 'Razer products with the least exciting name', the Razer Audio Mixer is the gaming brand’s answer to the popular GoXLR Mini. In fact, bar two missing corners and a different logo at the top, we found they’re practically the same.

The Razer Audio Mixer is a USB audio interface offering an XLR input with phantom power, four audio faders, and a handful of semi-customizable rubber buttons. It’s a smart-looking unit and build quality is solid across the board. The faders are smooth with a pleasant amount of resistance, though they aren’t motorized so won’t react to level changes in the software and won’t dive to the bottom when you hit the mute button as you see with the GoXLR Mini. The rubber buttons are tactile and silent, though we found there to be a bit of a wobble to the two larger beep and mic mute buttons. 

As an audio interface, our testing revealed that it performs well with XLR input making it a useful option for a range of microphones, Razer or otherwise. All of the four faders are easy to configure to different channels in Razer’s Synapse software but all of your audio routing for specific apps still happens using Windows native functionality. 

It wouldn’t be a Razer product without customizable RGB lighting and there’s a range of options on offer with the Audio Mixer. Synapse provides control of everything from the Razer logo at the top to animating the fader lights. It all works neatly within the ecosystem so those with a Razer-heavy setup already will appreciate the harmony.

At $250 / £250, it’s a pricey option and almost double the price of the GoXLR Mini, but for those already aligned with the Razer world, it’s a quality, helpful addition to your stream setup.

Read more: Razer Audio Mixer review

Seiren brand sound in a small form factor

Specifications

Voltage: N/A
Polar patterns: Omnidirectional
Connectivity: Bluetooth
Frequency response: N/A - Supports Bluetooth Wideband Voice
Features: Wireless, built-in clip, 3.5mm headphone jack

Reasons to buy

+
High build quality
+
Strong battery life
+
Wireless flexibility 

Reasons to avoid

-
Middling audio quality 
-
Built in clip can be fiddly

Officially the smallest microphone in Razer’s lineup (and possibly any streamer microphone lineup) the Seiren BT is Razer’s first attempt at taking audio away from your desk. A tiny Bluetooth mic designed to give mobile streamers a quality, flexible audio option.

A sleek black pill, the Razer Seiren BT was built with portability in mind. The design features an in-built clip to attach directly to your collar, a handy feature that perfectly suits Razer’s IRL streamer goals. Six hours of runtime from the rechargeable battery offers plenty of juice and a pair of detachable windsocks for different conditions is a nice touch.

We found the setup via Bluetooth to be simple, connecting directly to our phone or the Razer easily - the latter unlocks some additional features. The Razer Seiren BT offers 3 levels of AI noise canceling which we found to do a good job of blocking unwanted background noise; perfect for putting you center stage when out and about. An omnidirectional pickup pattern means once it’s on, you can just about forget about which way it’s pointing and a 3.5mm headphone jack lets you monitor your audio on the fly.

For all the Razer Seiren BT does well, there is a trade-off: sound quality. Given the tiny form factor and $99 / £99 price point of the Seiren BT, this shouldn’t come as a major surprise. It’s important to taper expectations when it comes to performance here, as this microphone just wasn't able to deliver studio-quality vocals to us in testing no matter how hard the AI tries. Instead, it falls somewhere in line with most headset mics or Apple Airpods when it comes to audio quality. If wireless freedom is your primary need, however, the Razer Serien BT is definitely one to consider.

Read more: Razer Seiren BT review


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I'm the Commissioning Editor for Hardware at GamesRadar+ and have been here since late 2018. I'm also a writer on games and have had work published over the last five years or so at the likes of Eurogamer, RPS, PCGN, and more. Day to day, I take care of a whole host of gaming tech reviews, buying guides, and news and deals content that pops up across GamesRadar+. I'm also a qualified landscape and garden designer, so I do that in my spare time. I'm also an expert on the virtual landscapes and environments of games and love to write about them too, including in an upcoming book on the topic!