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Godfall graphics video shows off frankly ridiculously good-looking lighting and textures

A new Godfall video that shows off the power of AMD's new graphics cards also delivers a subtle shot across Nvidia's bow.

The video is an undeniably gorgeous demonstration for Godfall's visuals, and perfectly timed to justify the surprisingly steep Godfall PC specs that were officially revealed this week. The video is narrated by Counterplay Games CEO Keith Lee, and he runs down the biggest improvements to Godfall's graphics that were made possible by his studio's partnership with AMD one by one.

One of the biggest bullet points is how the game runs at high resolutions, and this is ideally where Nvidia executives start tugging at their collars: "At 4K resolution using ultra HD textures, Godfall requires tremendous memory bandwidth to run smoothly," Lee says. "In this intricately detailed scene we're using 4K by 4K texture sizes, and 12 gigabytes of graphics memory to play at 4K resolutions. The infinity cache on AMD's Radeon RX6000 series cards runs Godfall at high frame rates with maximum settings enabled."

The standard models for Radeon's entire RX6000 series of cards all have 16GB of  graphics memory, whereas only Nvidia's highest-end new card - the GeForce RTX 3090 - has enough memory to meet that demand in its standard kit.

Lee also points out how the game uses DirectX 12 Ultimate's new ray-tracing solution, DXR 1.1, to offer improved lighting for the game, and special AMD FidelityFX tech to offer sharper and more distinct details with minimal performance sacrifices. We'll have to wait until Godfall comes out on November 12 and the new AMD cards start rolling out later this month to see how much of a difference this all makes in real-life conditions, but until then it all makes for a hell of a graphics showcase.

Counterplay Games also has a lot to say about the benefits of playing Godfall on PS5, including DualSense haptic feedback and superfast loading. 

Connor Sheridan
Connor has been doing news and feature things for GamesRadar+ since 2012, which is suddenly a long time ago. How on earth did that happen?