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Super Meat Boy Forever coming next week as a Switch console launch exclusive

The long-awaited sequel Super Meat Boy Forever is coming to Switch on Wednesday, December 23 ahead of its eventual PS4 and Xbox One release. We don't know the exact window of its launch exclusivity, just that it'll be on Switch first.

Aptly named developer Team Meat confirmed the game's Switch release date in today's Nintendo Indie World showcase. We also got a new look at the bloody 2D platformer in action, with protagonists Meat Boy and Bandage Girl flinging themselves through saws, saws, and honestly just a whole lot of saws as they pursue their kidnapped daughter Nugget. 

Super Meat Boy Forever is Super Meat Boy 2 by another name, and Team Meat seriously upped the ante for the sequel. For starters, you can do more than run and jump this time. Meat Boy and Bandage Girl can slide, dive, and attack, which means levels will throw several new types of hazards your way. But the main pitch is that each playthrough is randomly assembled from thousands of possible levels using a system that the studio describes as "a remarkable feat of engineering and a monumental example of ignoring the limits of rational game design and production." 

Every level is made from 100 "chunks" worth of obstacles, and every time you beat one, a harder version is generated and added into the pool. Each time you clear the game, you'll get the option to play through it again with all-new levels. In other words, if you absolutely cannot get enough of Super Meat Boy's particular brand of corpse-running, this may well be your forever game. 

Not sure what games, accessories, or peripherals to gift this year? Here are the best gifts for gamers this season. 

Austin Wood

Austin freelanced for the likes of PC Gamer, Eurogamer, IGN, Sports Illustrated, and more while finishing his journalism degree, and he's been with GamesRadar+ since 2019. They've yet to realize that his position as a staff writer is just a cover up for his career-spanning Destiny column, and he's kept the ruse going with a focus on news and the occasional feature.