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PS5 Pro will reportedly arrive in late 2023

PlayStation 5
(Image credit: Sony PlayStation)

A PS5 Pro console is likely to release 2023, according to a new report.

In a recent video from tech channel Moore's Law is Dead, the channel's founder says that "there is a PlayStation 5 Pro coming in a similar timeframe to when one came out after the original PS4 launch." The PS4 Pro arrived three years after the base PS4, leading the YouTuber to suggest they think a PS5 could arrive "by the end of 2023."

It's not clear yet, however, how powerful that new machine will be. While some sources suggest that Sony could really push the boundaries of its tech, resulting in a console costing as much as $700, Moore's Law is Dead suggests that players might not be willing to invest that much, even with the possibility of 8K gaming. Instead, a Pro console could limit its specs in an attempt to lower prices. There's also mention of a 'PS5 Slim', which Moore's Law is Dead expects to see late next year.

While Sony is planning entirely new consoles, Microsoft is reportedly aiming to "refresh" its Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S consoles, starting with the smaller offering. After discussing Sony, the video claims that "Microsoft is targeting 'at least one' refresh for late 2022." The company's apparent priority is to re-release the Xbox Series S with improved specs. The YouTuber suggests that a new console would cost up to $50 more than the current offering, but that Microsoft plans to drop the price of the older model, potentially to less than $200.

While the Xbox Series S might get a boost first, the Xbox Series X isn't getting left behind. The video suggests that Microsoft is also planning a boost for its more powerful console, but that that refresh is "planned for 2023 or later." One potential reason behind the decision to focus on the Series S is Microsoft's reported desire to "undercut" the aforementioned PS5 Slim. 

It's important to note that in the absence of any official word from either Sony or Microsoft, while eventual updates to the current console generation seem likely, you should take any current reports with a pinch of salt. With none of this hardware expected for at least another 12 to 15 months, there's plenty of room for plans to change.

How do the current models stack up against one another? Here's what we think of the PS5 vs Xbox Series X.

Ali Jones

I'm GamesRadar's deputy news editor, working with Ben T across our gaming news articles. I started my journalistic career while getting my degree in English Literature at the University of Warwick, where I also worked as Games Editor on the student newspaper, The Boar. Since then, I've run the news sections at PCGamesN and Kotaku UK, and also regularly contributed to PC Gamer. As you might be able to tell, PC is my platform of choice, so you can regularly find me playing League of Legends or Steam's latest indie hit.