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Killzone: Liberation review

A broader view of the battlefield just means there's more deadliness to worry about

Although the controls are easy, the action is anything but. They might look like stormtroopers and pour out of magical closets in one-to-three-man waves, but the Helghast are a formidable enemy; most of them are smart enough to hide behind cover while fighting you, and the really scary ones carry powerful shotguns and toss grenades to flush you out of hiding. They're also fond of traps, and so you'll constantly have to deal with hard-to-see mines, laser tripwires and impossible-to-hit spider robots that explode when they get close to you (or close to an enemy, which makes them fun).

You've got a few advantages of your own, though; each stage is filled with weapons chests (which pack guns, explosives and health packs), and a quick life boost is usually just a smashable crate away. There are even a few times where you'll get to pilot a big, powerful vehicle, like a tank or a hovercraft, that can smash through the Helghast with satisfying ease. (Of course, these points are usually where the Helghast start carrying missile launchers, so the benefit is negligible.)

In addition to the lengthy campaign mode, Liberation throws in a bunch of unlockable challenge modes - essentially quick, pick-up-and-play skirmishes with simple, pre-defined goals - that can boost Templar's abilities. It also features a slew of multiplayer modes, including a two-player co-op run through the campaign, a six-player deathmatch and team-based capture-the-flag, team deathmatch and assault game modes. These are incredibly fun if you've got six people with PSPs together, but if you're not so lucky, a downloadable patch enabling infrastructure play will be available soon from the game'sofficial site.

More Info

DescriptionWith snappy multiplayer action and surprisingly complex level structure, Killzone: Liberation is another killer action title for the PSP.
US censor ratingTeen
Release date31 October 2006 (US), (UK)


After graduating from college in 2000 with a BA in journalism, I worked for five years as a copy editor, page designer and videogame-review columnist at a couple of mid-sized newspapers you've never heard of. My column eventually got me a freelancing gig with GMR magazine, which folded a few months later. I was hired on full-time by GamesRadar in late 2005, and have since been paid actual money to write silly articles about lovable blobs.
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