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94 comments

  • winner2 - December 22, 2012 11:38 a.m.

    Situation is unofficialy overblown. People die all the time.
  • C.King - December 22, 2012 11:52 a.m.

    i been confused about that actually, you're right people do die all the time. so why do we keep yakking about the same stuff about certain incidents and not all incidents. would it be a solution to start having security guards everywhere now? i can't really blame games for being violent since i believe it's when people who don't have an outlet for their frustrations that go nuts but maybe video games isn't enough of one. perhaps everyone should take up a fighting sport like boxing, fencing, or a martial art.
  • Funkzillabot - December 22, 2012 12:09 p.m.

    Yes. People do die. That is a fact of life. However, they aren't usually GUNNED DOWN in elementary school at the age of 8, in such vast numbers. But using condescending words like "overblown" for such a serious issue -- works well as an excuse.....I guess.
  • Dman3981 - December 22, 2012 3:41 p.m.

    Well a man in Beijing went into an elementary school and slashed 22 kids. Nobody seemed to care about that. Granted they weren't killed but they were severely injured and could have been killed.
  • JachAnen - December 24, 2012 4:06 p.m.

    Actually people did care about that and the day after extra guards were put in place as they have had 2 of these incidents. How many shootings like this have the US had without doing anything?? And wouldn't you rather have all these gun nuts running around with a knife that is considerably easier to run away from than bullets?? He wouldn't have gotten away with 26 kills thats for sure and probably not suicide either.
  • ParagonT - December 26, 2012 6:45 a.m.

    Unless he planted a bomb or strapped a bomb onto himself. Not that hard to do. Or just used a chainsaw, hatchet, etc...
  • gadjo - December 27, 2012 10:51 a.m.

    Off topic, but a chainsaw would actually be an incredibly useless weapon for a mass killing. Sure, it would be a horrible way to die for the one person he attacked, but it's harder to make a fast cut with a chainsaw than you think.
  • ParagonT - December 27, 2012 1:57 p.m.

    I've held a chainsaw before, its not that hard to swing or move with. It's doesn't even need to be big to do damage. This of course was also implying the Chinese incident with the slasher. He somehow got 20 slashes in with some in serious condition, just imagine. Besides, I don't think the guy really had a strict number in his head thinking "I have to slash this many children or this was all for nothing..." It's definitely not the most effective, your right, but it would have done much more than a few stitches can fix.
  • ParagonT - December 27, 2012 2:03 p.m.

    My mistake, 22.
  • ~LanceR. - December 22, 2012 9:46 a.m.

    Here comes the blame game..
  • gabriel-crumb - December 22, 2012 9:03 a.m.

    Had he not shot up the school, he would have simply blown it up with a bomb. People don't want to hear that tragedies like this were unpreventable, but so long as the criminally insane EXIST in this world, things like this are unfortunately inevitable. If you want to blame anyone, blame those that knew the shooter was disturbed and took no steps get him help. Those in the family who stood by and allowed him and his mother to degenerate into the mentally disturbed monsters they became.
  • JachAnen - December 24, 2012 4:11 p.m.

    So you know that this kid knew how to make a bomb?? Are Americans taught that in school?? And if his mother had no guns in her house, that he would know where to get them and still do what he did?? And from what I have heard, the kid didn't seem this messed up. Sometimes psychos can't be seen before it's to late.
  • ParagonT - December 26, 2012 6:49 a.m.

    The internet. How do you know if he didn't know how to make a bomb? We can place the assumption game all we want but you know just as little as everyone else.
  • UltimateLemon - December 25, 2012 2:40 p.m.

    I don't know if you know this, most civilians have hard time getting bombs and the police takes dim views at people making IEDs. On the other hand, guns are telatively easy to come by in US; precisely because people aren't willing to have their right to carry firearms restrictes.
  • daniel-moore - December 22, 2012 7:20 a.m.

    So... the fact the NRA have there own Playstation 2 game is irreverent right? Look up NRA Gun Club for PS2, The game sucks on an every possible aspect but does prove they are Hypocritical.
  • ParagonT - December 22, 2012 6:18 a.m.

    The gun industry and game industry is not to blame. Although video games do increase aggression in youth and adults alike, that does not mean it's the reason many do these atrocious things. Side note: I can just see it now, the civilians disarmed and your military still equipped. That doesn't seem like a healthy relationship at all.
  • Thedigitalg - December 22, 2012 11:50 a.m.

    Actually, video games drastically decrease sensitivity to violence, but decrease violent tendencies. Meaning, a tragedy wouldn't really affect me, but I wouldn't commit a violent crime.
  • ParagonT - December 22, 2012 1:06 p.m.

    Actually I did an extensive report on this and it does increase aggression, not meaning it increases crime or violence, but competitive and social aggression.
  • sxh967 - December 22, 2012 2:58 p.m.

    I don't know if you saw it but there was an experiment done, which showed that Project Gotham Racing actually caused people to become more aggressive than being killed or killing someone brutally on Gears of War. The reasons given were that people find it difficult to relate to games like Gears of War (which is totally unrealistic) or even games like Battlefield, or GTA because they don't have real life experiences with which to compare it. People have experiences of racing (perhaps in the form of athletics at school or on a mountain bike) but it appears that sports and driving games actually made people more aggressive. Basically, based on the results from that report (and it was a well carried out one using the latest neuroscience technology available), "violent" video games don't really make people that aggressive at all. Anyway, if you did a report I'd love to read it, I'll send you my email address by PM if you're happy to send it to me. Peace!
  • ParagonT - December 22, 2012 6:01 p.m.

    If you ask me my sources in about a months time (which is when I'm back into college), I'll PM you them when I can access my old flash-drive. The studies that I found were peer reviewed, full text with EBSCO, and of course I had a few library sources, so I hope you can access them. Also, I just read the Full Text and the research is very quite interesting, I did my report at the beginning of my sophomore year, so this is something new to think about. As for the subject of the research, this needs to be peer reviewed and repeated on different occasions by others. It does state that driving games do produce more aggressive responses. The hypothesis of the games being related to real life occurrences and experience is a good one and plausible. So to fully understand this concept, they would need to try this out on kids who have much less experience with vehicles, perhaps someone who has killed before, and actual players of the sport in the game. (I can't imagine that many of the few subjects that played the Tennis game had played before.) Also this needs to be applied to more than just 20 and 40 participants. Good stuff, I await when a publication is made on more of this subject. ----Psychological Bulletin; Mar 2010, Vol. 136 Issue 2, p 151-173, 23p---- But just a quick search and read through popped this up. This has statistical data in it to actually show the reader what studies have shown. It's a long read, but it admits some problems with current information available et. longitudinal studies. It also states some clear things about misinterpretations within some authors arguments. We should continue this ala PM sometime. Good article. I'll look more into it later.

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