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Government videogame review: have your say!

9 Oct, 2007

Last month UK PM Gordon Brown announced plans for a public review into violent and sexual imagery in games.

Today the report has been formalised and given a figurehead in Dr Tanya Byron (of Little Angels/House of Tiny Tearaways TV fame). The report will referred to as the Byron Review: children and new technology.

A 'call for evidence' has been listed at the official government website which outlines the questions the review will be addressing and gives any interested parties the opportunity to voice their opinions on any of the questions below.

So if you want to have a say in the way the UK government's policy on videogames is directed we recommend you get involved while you can and register at www.dcsf.gov.uk/consultations  (the closing date is the 20 November.) You'll only regret it later if you don't.

The points for discussion in full.

1. What are the benefits of video games to a) children and young people, b) society, c) the economy?

2. What are the opportunities presented by video games to a) children and young people, b) society, c) the economy?

3. What are the potential and actual risks to children and young people who engage with video games and how should the Review approach defining and measuring the risks? 

4. What do a) children and young people and b) parents know already about the potential and actual risks of playing video games?

5. What do a) children and young people and b) parents think and feel about the potential and actual risks of playing video games?

6. What are the range of mechanisms that exist to help children, young people and parents manage the potential or actual risks of playing a) hard copy video games b) games downloaded from the internet c) games played on line?

7. To what extent do a) children and young people and b) parents understand and use the video games age classification system and/or other descriptions of content?

8. In what other ways do a) children and young people and b) parents seek to manage perceived risks of video gaming and how do they feel about their ability to do so?

9. How well do these different approaches and mechanisms work?

10. What roles do the retail and advertising sectors play in supporting children, young people and parents to manage potential and actual risks in playing video games?

11. What opportunities exist for children, young people and parents to learn about safe, responsible and fulfilling video game playing – and do they help?

12. What, if anything, could be changed in order to help children, young people and parents manage the potential or actual risks of playing a) hard copy video games b) games downloaded from the internet c) games played on line, and what are the pros and cons of different approaches?

13. What are the emerging opportunities for developing other ways of supporting children, young people and parents?

 

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