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New Star Wars book reveals why The High Republic fell – and kicks off a new era of stories

(Image credit: Lucasfilm/Del Rey)

Lucasfilm has bold plans for The High Republic, a whole new series of Star Wars books and comics set 200 years before the Skywalker Saga. Now, we’ve seen the very first glimpse of the tragic event that starts it all.

IGN features an extract from Charles Soule’s upcoming novel Light of the Jedi, set for release in January 2021.

In it, the Republic ship The Legacy Run undergoes a dangerous hyperspace manoeuvre which sees not only Captain Hedda Casset go down with the ship, but the wreckage shooting off at hyper-speed to various points of the galaxy. Which is not good. Not good at all.

Why is that moment so important? Well, The High Republic is described as the moment where “the Galactic Republic is at its height. Protected by the Jedi Knights, guardians of peace and justice throughout the galaxy.”

The destruction of The Legacy Run is the moment where it all breaks apart and sets off a chain reaction of events that, conceivably, led to the rise of the Sith and creation of the Empire. It’s that crucial to Star Wars lore. And it all begins here.

“The opening beats of Light of the Jedi depict an epic disaster, and a heroic, thrilling response by both the Republic and the Jedi to save lives and end the crisis. It's just the beginning, though. The Legacy Run disaster kicks off a much larger story; it really is just one piece of a much bigger saga,” Soule told IGN.

With a Marvel comic series, a High Republic Adventures comic book, plus a pair of YA novels to look forward to, the future is looking bright for Star Wars away from the big screen. 2021 can’t come soon enough.

For more on The High Republic, here’s every major Jedi that will be appearing in the saga.

GamesRadar+'s Entertainment Writer. Lover of all things Nintendo, in a tortured love/hate relationship with Crystal Palace, and also possesses an unhealthy knowledge of The Simpsons (which is of no use at parties).