Best SSD for gaming 2022: Top performing drives for your PC

Best SSD for gaming - Samsung 980 Pro
(Image credit: Future)

The best SSDs for gaming make loading screens a thing of the past. Gone are the days when finishing a level meant you had time to check your phone. No matter which platform you play on now, solid state drives are king, and have definitely taken over from the slower HDDs of previous generations. Take a game like Marvel’s Spider-Man, for example. Despite releasing with pretty speedy fast travel in 2018, it recently came to PC in a remastered edition. Gaming SSDs in 2022 are so superior to the PS4’s HDD that the humorous cutscenes of Spidey riding the subway barely have time to show before you’re zipping about Manhattan again.

What puts the best SSDS for gaming way ahead of HDDs though? Without getting too technical, SSDs offer much faster read and write speeds - with some offering over 7,000 MB/s - as they don't rely on the traditional spinning discs of HDDs. For reference, even some of the HDDs on our best external hard drive list would be lucky to clock 200 MB/s.

In 2022, the most popular models among the best SSDs for gaming are Gen 4.0 NVMe drives; though SATAs and Gen 3.0 NVMes are still good-value options, especially in large capacities. Gen 4.0 SSDs can operate many times faster than a SATA III SSD thanks to their extremely efficient motherboard interface that allows higher input/output operations per second (IOPS). These SSDs are also smaller than SATAs, which means they fit neatly into the best gaming PCs - and now act as some of the best PS5 SSDs too. 

We are getting ever closer to PCle Gen 5.0 drives, which will surely shake up the best SSD for gaming market. Luckily, SSD has been seeing a real price drop across the board in 2022, so either way, these amazing forms of storage should be a lot more affordable in the months to come.

The best SSD for gaming in 2022

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WD Black SN850

(Image credit: Western Digital)
The best SSD for gaming overall

Specifications

Capacities: up to 4TB
Interface: AIC PCIe 4.0 x4
Read/write speed: 7000 / 5300 MB/s
Random read/write speed: 1M / 720K IOPS
DRAM cache: 1GB DDR4
SLC cache: 300GB dynamic
Write endurance: 600TB
Warranty: 5 years

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent all-round performance
+
Exceptional 4K QD1 write speed
+
Large SLC cache

Reasons to avoid

-
Can get hot under sustained loads
-
Lacks the Phison E18 controller

Right now, the WD Black SN850 is our favourite SSD for gaming. 

Tested here in 1TB form and also available in 500GB and 2TB capacities, the SN850 is an absolute screamer thanks to its quad-lane PCIe Gen 4 interface, shiny new controller chipset, and a large 300GB chunk of its SanDisk 96L 3D TLC flash memory running in super-fast SLC cache mode. WD claimed that the SN850 can push 7,000 MB/s and 5,000 MB/s read and write respectively; our testing found that the WD Black SN850 lived up to the claimed figures with 6,996 MB/s read and 5,205 MB/s write - actually surpassing the quoted figures! 

Where it really scores, however, is in 4K random performance, which is arguably more important in terms of how responsive your PC feels. At 250MB/s, it’s the fastest flash drive we’ve seen for 4K random writes at queue depth one. Impressive.

As you’d expect given the SLC cache provisioning, sustained performance is excellent, too, maintaining peak performance right up to that 300GB marker, which should be plenty for most people. WD’s confidence in the SN850’s broader longevity is likewise indicated by the five-year warranty and 6TB write rating. All of which means our only reservations with this excellent SSD involve cooling and pricing. For the former, there is none as standard, which is a slight concern given this SSD can run hot. 

Silicon Power US70

(Image credit: Silicon Power)
The best budget Gen 4.0 NVMe SSD

Specifications

Capacities: 1TB - 2TB
Interface: AIC PCIe 4.0 x4
Read/write speed: 5,000 / 4,400 MB/s
Random read/write speed: 750,000 / 750,000 IOPS
Warranty : 5 years

Reasons to buy

+
Great price-to-performance ratio
+
Affordable for its capacity 
+
Easy to install and setup

Reasons to avoid

-
Gets hot under stress 

The great thing about SSD technology is that you don’t have to go to the biggest brands and most expensive manufacturers for great read and write speeds. The Silicon Power US70 is one of the more affordable Gen 4.0 NVMe drives that you can get your hands on in 2022, and this is due to the more modest targeted figures of 5,000 MB/s read and 4,400 MB/s write. In our testing, we found that the drive yielded respectable figures of around 3 GB/s read and 3.3 GB/s write respectively which is solid considering the quoted numbers, but a little away from what was possible. 

AnvilPro gave us the score of 16,591.33 which positions the Silicon Power US70 in league with some of the humbler Gen 4.0 SSDs on the market right now. Thermal performance was particularly impressive, as the hottest the US70 got when being benched and enduring lengthy file transfers hovered between the 40 and 44-degree mark. This means that the drive ran nice and cool, which is something we cannot say for every Gen 4.0 SSD that passes by our test rigs.

The Silicon Power US70 is unlikely to set the world of gaming PCs ablaze with its lightning fast rates, however, if you're after a strong performer at prices starting from around the $100 / £100 mark then there's little more you could ask for. That price-to-performance ratio is the all important factor here. 

Seagate FireCuda 530

(Image credit: Future/Jeremy Laird)
The best premium SSD for gaming

Specifications

Capacities: up to 4TB
Interface: AIC PCIe 4.0 x4
Read/write speed: 7,300 / 6,900 MB/s
Random read/write speed: 1M / 1M IOPS
DRAM cache: 2GB DDR4
SLC cache: up to 450GB (model dependent)
Write endurance: 2550TB
Warranty: 5 years

Reasons to buy

+
Super all-round performance
+
Epic endurance
+
PS5 compatible

Reasons to avoid

-
Good rather than great 4K throughput
-
One of the most expensive on the market

Seagate is one of the biggest names in storage and the Seagate Firecuda 530 2TB is absolutely up there with the big boys. This is partly due to the use of the excellent Phison E18 controller.

We found in our testing that the Firecuda 530 2TB lived up to the claimed figures of 7,300 MB/s and 6,900 MB/s read, making this drive one of the faster Phison E18-based SSDs around. We clocked just over 7GB/s and just shy of the 6.9GB/s read figures. 

The random performance of the Firecuda 530 2TB isn't quite as strong as its sequential offerings, though. Simply put, this drive offers good rates but doesn't quite excel in the same fashion as other Phison E18 units. We clocked 83 MB/s 4K reads and 251 MB/s writes, which still offers a great experience, however, doesn't quite hit that 300 MB/s figure that the WD Black SN850 can.

If you can say all that of most drives based on the Phison E18 controller, the Firecuda’s epic 2,550TB write endurance rating is something really exceptional. It’s also worth noting that this drive is fully compatible with the Sony PS5 and is optionally available with a PS5-optimised heatsink. All told, it’s one heck of an SSD that also happens to be one of our favourite PS5 SSDs.

Kingston Fury Renegade SSD

(Image credit: Kingston)
The best SSD for seriously fast sequential performance

Specifications

Capacities: up to 4TB
Interface: PCIe 4.0 NVMe
Read/write speed: 7,300 / 7,000 MB/s
Random read/write speed: 1,000,000 / 1,000,000 IOPS
Warranty: 5 years

Reasons to buy

+
Stellar built-in heat spreader 
+
Amazing sequential read speeds 
+
Double-sided

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricey in higher configurations

The Kingston Fury Renegade impresses across the board as one of the best SSDs for gaming on the market right now. With its stated speeds reaching upwards of 7,000 MBS, we're happy to report that this drive really is the real deal when it comes to blazing-fast performance perfect for DirectStorage. 

Our benchmarks don't lie, and neither did Kingston. The Fury Renegade achieved read and write speeds of 7,344.99MB/s and 6,873.21MB/s respectively through CrystalDiskMark, and a stellar Anvil score of 21,649.35 for some seriously impressive performance. Of course, raw numbers mean nothing if the in-game performance can't back it up. Fortunately, loading and transfer times were as close to instant as you would hope for from a drive of this caliber. 

Briefing touching on transfer times, we noted that CyberPunk2077, a 64.88GB game, took only 22.66 seconds being written from one NVMe drive to the Kingston. It's a similar story with Destiny 2, and its 73.5GB of content, which made the jump between drives in just 28 seconds. Loading times were all but non-existent as well, as we were able to jump into Halo Infinite's main campaign in a mere 18 seconds - straight into gameplay.

WD Black SN770

(Image credit: Western Digital)

5. WD Black SN770 1TB

The best affordable Gen 4.0 NVMe SSD

Specifications

Capacities: up to 2TB
Interface: PCIe 4.0 NVMe
Read/write speed: 5,150 / 4,900 MB/s
Random write / read speed: 740K / 800K IOPS
Warranty: 5 years

Reasons to buy

+
Achieves targeted read and write speeds
+
Decent sequential performance 
+
Competitively priced for a 1TB drive

Reasons to avoid

-
Random read speeds are average

The WD Black SN770 is the successor to the hugely popular mid-tier WD Black SN750 SE model. It features a vastly improved sequential and random performance but at a similar price point. While you're unlikely to be blown away by the raw numbers that the WD Black SN770 outputs, it is one of the best SSDs for gaming for those after an affordable, and consistent, Gen 4.0 drive in 2022. 

In our testing, we found that the WD Black SN770 achieved its respectable claimed sequential speeds, with CrystalDiskMark read and write benchmarks of 5,227.53 and 4,980.83 respectively. What's more, the Anvil Pro score was equally solid at 20,024.98, which is a figure normally reserved for more upmarket NVMe drives. 

With its aggressive asking price MSRP of $129.99 / £142.99 for a 1TB model, the WD Black SN770 certainly positions itself as one of the more competitive offerings from the storage brand. If you're after a drive with a terrific price-to-performance ratio that'll do everything from quick OS boot times to lightning-fast in-game loading, then the WD Black SN770 is a hard proposition to beat for the money. 

WD Black SN750

(Image credit: Western Digital)

6. WD Black SN750

A familiar name and model is a go-to NVMe SSD

Specifications

Capacities: 250GB - 4TB
Interface: M.2 PCIe 3.0 x4
Seq. read (1MB): 3,108 MB/s (250GB)
Seq. write (1MB): 1,575 MB/s (250GB)
Seq. read (4MB): 2,474 MB/s (250GB)
Seq. write (4MB): 1,488 MB/s (250GB)

Reasons to buy

+
Fairly priced
+
One of the best performing M.2 SSDs on the market
+
Range of capacities available

Reasons to avoid

-
More expensive than SATA

One of the best performing M.2 SSDs on the market is the WD Black SN750. It doesn't innovate much over its predecessor – it's still on the same hardware, after all – but the performance tests prove that you don't need to fix what ain't broke. It's worth noting that we've only tested the 250GB variant of the SN750 – the increased sizes seem to offer better performance, peaking at 1TB, before the 2TB option starts to decrease again. However, at just £45/$55 for the 250GB model, you're not breaking the bank for an SSD that can hold a good few games.

In AnvilPro, the 250GB SN750 came back with 2,474 MB/s and 1,488 MB/s read and write scores in the sequential 4MB category, but improved upon them slightly – as expected – in CrystalDiskMark's 1MB test, with 3108 MB/s and 1575 MB/s. These are incredibly hearty numbers and show that the drive has the chops to handle whatever you throw at it.

I've been mainly using the SN750 for my single-player games – Assassin's Creed Valhalla, Cyberpunk 2077, etc. – and the loading is impressively quick, to the point where this SSD – especially at this price – would easily take the number one spot in this buying guide were it not for the incredible speeds of the AN1500.

Crucial MX500

(Image credit: Crucial)

7. Crucial MX500

A top-performing SATA type SSD

Specifications

Capacities: 250GB - 2TB
Interface: SATA 6Gbps
Seq. read (1MB): 561 MB/s (1TB)
Seq. write (1MB): 468 MB/s (1TB)
Seq. read (4MB): 524 MB/s (1TB)
Seq. write (4MB): 482 MB/s (1TB)

Reasons to buy

+
The best SATA SSD available
+
Cheap compared to M2 SSDs

Reasons to avoid

-
SATA is much slower than other formats

SATA-type drives are the oldest form of SSDs on the market. And while they can't quite compare against the M.2 form storage devices, they are still worthy of their place in the best SSD for gaming conversation - almost purely on value alone.

Simply put, nowadays, they are remarkably cheap. And you can have multiple SATA drives in your PC, provided you have the cables and setup, and for a bargain price. These drives can really shine as great backup drives for games and storing files on and the Crucial MX500 is the best of the lot, so you can't go far wrong. Especially since it costs considerably less than other SATA SSD models at just $50 or £40 for 250GB, or around $225/£200 for a 2TB bad boy.

On the benchmarking front, the Crucial MX500 doesn't 'impress' much compared to the other SSDs in this guide, but as explained above, that's due to the SATA connection - everything is relative, after all. In the sequential 1MB test, it provides 561 MB/s read and 468 MB/s write – almost identical to the 4MB test with 524 MB/s and 482 MB/s respectively.

If you're looking for a main SSD, then, budget-dependent, one of the above SSDs are likely your best bet, but if you're looking for a secondary drive, or are building a budget rig, then the Crucial MX500 is certainly one of the best of the rest. I currently use it for all the games I can't fit on my other drives and while the loading speeds aren't quite the same, it's still far better and faster than any HDD would be (and most other SATA SSDs, for that matter).

Best SSD for gaming: Frequently asked questions

What is a good size for a gaming SSD?

As games continue to get larger, we generally recommend either a 1TB or 2TB  model over anything smaller in the NVMe form factor. This is to give you enough headroom to load up titles from your virtual game libraries (such as Steam, Epic, or Origin) without having to constantly make room for new releases. Also, 1TB / 2TB drives tend to run slightly faster than their smaller siblings in the same product line. 

What is a good SSD speed for gaming?

While there's no hard and fast rule as to the quickness of an SSD, we would strongly recommend a minimum of a Gen 3.0 drive in your gaming PC as it has rates of up to 3,500 MB/s read and write respectively. However, should you want the best of the best, then we're seeing sequential performance exceeding 7,000 MB/s from flagship Gen 4.0 drives at the moment. Our advice is to go with the fastest drive that your budget allows, but ideally, you'll want to go NVMe over the slower SATA and HDD models online. 

Are SSDs good for gaming?

With PC games continuing to become more demanding in terms of bandwidth and file sizes, SSDs are the way to go to minimize loading times and have faster boot-up speeds. A Gen 4.0 SSD especially is fast enough to load in things such as HD textures and the larger game worlds that modern titles utilize. You'll certainly notice the difference than if you booted your games through a traditional hard drive.

What brand of SSD is best?

From the list above, two brands stand out to us as the go-to SSD manufacturers. Seagate and Western Digital.

WD (which owns SanDisk, if you didn't know), was founded back in 1986 and is now one of the most trusted names in all of storage. Their WD Black products in both SSD and HDD are stellar, and their popularity speaks for them. 

Seagate, which is perhaps more of a household name than WD, has always been at the peak of the storage mountain. Their FireCuda 530 was the first SSD confirmed for the PS5, and it's easy to see why.

With that in mind, we stand by what we said earlier on in our list. You don't have to go to big brand names to find exceptional read and write speeds. When it comes to SSD, you can trust the technology.


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Duncan Robertson
Hardware Editor

Ever since playing Journey at the age of 15, I’ve been desperate to cover video games for a living. After graduating from Edinburgh Napier University with a degree in Journalism, I contributed to the Scottish Games Network and completed an Editorial Internship over at Expert Reviews. Besides that, I’ve been managing my own YouTube channel and Podcast for the last 7 years. It’s been a long road, but all that experience somehow landed me a dream job covering gaming hardware. I’m a self-confessing PlayStation fanboy, but my experience covering the larger business and developer side of the whole industry has given me a strong knowledge of all platforms. When I’m not testing out every peripheral I can get my hands on, I’m probably either playing tennis or dissecting game design for an upcoming video essay. Now, I better stop myself here before I get talking about my favourite games like HUNT: Showdown, Dishonored, and Towerfall Ascension.
Location: UK Remote

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