Home - first look

Sony unveils its new online strategy: realistic avatars, custom spaces and enough user input to choke a horse

While playing dress-up and using emotive actions like waving and dancing is cool, though, your character is really the least of what you'll get. Home also gives every player their own apartment (upgradeable, apparently) to mess around with, which you can decorate with new paint jobs or game-centric themes. You can also add furniture to your digs, and here's where things get cool. Unlike, say, The Sims, in which furniture is laid out on a grid, you can arrange your surroundings however you like - even if it's stacking your trendy new chairs haphazardly in a corner by literally throwing them at the wall.


After graduating from college in 2000 with a BA in journalism, I worked for five years as a copy editor, page designer and videogame-review columnist at a couple of mid-sized newspapers you've never heard of. My column eventually got me a freelancing gig with GMR magazine, which folded a few months later. I was hired on full-time by GamesRadar in late 2005, and have since been paid actual money to write silly articles about lovable blobs.


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