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  • GlobalNightmare - April 13, 2013 1:27 a.m.

    Pokemon wouldn't exist without the Final fantasy series. World of warcraft wouldn't exist without gauntlet. Doom wouln't exist without Wolfenstein. How does farmville hit the list? That exists because of sim city. Track and field? Micro machines? Sonic? Columns? Starfox? Castlevania? I could go on,and on. Is this a personal list, or has legit research been done? Some great games on this list, but so many have been overlooked. Try again.
  • JarkayColt - April 13, 2013 7:34 a.m.

    This list doesn't seem so much to do with precursory or strictly pioneering games; although there is some crossover, it's more to do with revolution, the lasting impact, and legacy. FarmVille is there because it made social gaming blow up real big and whether you like it or not it's had a lasting effect on the industry since; FYI Sim City was on the list too for an entirely different reason so I don't really get your point. Castlevania is also mentioned alongside Metroid, for instance, as it should be. Everything here seems to be there with good reason (first is not necessarily greatest), and it obviously isn't a personal list as the article has no single credited author. Just sayin'.
  • mafyooz - April 13, 2013 12:57 a.m.

    I was ready to pour scorn when I saw the screenshot of E.T. (I remember playing it on my mates Atari and it was every bit as bad as its reputation suggests), but after reading the reason for its inclusion I definitely see why it's on here :)
  • weezerbholly - April 13, 2013 12:01 a.m.

    Ummmm... fast blue hedgehog anyone?
  • JohnnyEagle - April 12, 2013 7:30 p.m.

    I don't mind Angry Birds being on the list. I mind that there was no mention of the Crush the Castle games in that section of the list.
  • MrXLiebezeit - April 12, 2013 5:10 p.m.

    Why Final Fantasy VII? I thought Final Fantasy IV/II was a bit more important, not necessarily better though. Also, it saddens me that my favorite game isn't on here, but when thinking about it, most people haven't played it. "With bony hands I hold my partner/ On soulless feet we cross the floor/ The music stops as if to answer/ An empty knocking at the door/ It seems his skin was sweet as mango/ When last I held him to my breast/ But now we dance this grim fandango/ And will four years before we rest" Grim Fandango may not have been very important, but it definitely was a masterpiece of game development.
  • ViolentLee - April 12, 2013 4:48 p.m.

    - I'd throw Batman: Arkham Asylum on the list for its innovative combat and the fact that it raised the bar for licensed games. - Assassin's Creed brought about user-friendly platforming and impressive crowd mechanics. - Canabalt was the first endless runner game - a genre that's HUGE on smartphones. - Elder Scrolls: Oblivion was a very important current-gen first-person sandbox game, which begat other huge titles like Fallout 3, Skyrim, etc. It also was one of the first console games to have real, substantial DLC as well as the much-maligned horse armor.
  • J-Fid - April 12, 2013 4:11 p.m.

    Not really surprised at the top of the list, although I thought Super Mario 64 would be a lot higher.
  • clint-welding - April 12, 2013 3:48 p.m.

    I think Conker's Bad Fur Day should have been on here, for it was a game that had outstanding graphics, sound effects, and physics, that no other games on N64, or Playstation could compare. It proved that graphical limits can be seemingly overcome by the right developers. Pokemon Stadium was revolutionary for being the first Console game to connect with handheld games for connectivity and bonus content. Mario Kart was the first party racer, Mario Party is a game that started the whole party/mini game collection games. Sonic the Hedgehog was the first game to innovate fast speeds in a side- scroller/platformer. Banjo-Kazooie was one of Nintendo 64's first games to utilize team action and moves, along with all else that was crammed in, like exploration and transformations. Banjo-Tooie took that further. Super Smash Bros opened up a great series to gather a bunch of people and play non stop, it was an easy to play fighting game that anyone could play. Marvel VS Capcom was likely one of the first cross over games to start the trend, who knows, without it, there may have never been a Kingdom Hearts or Mario & Sonic Olympic games, Tekken X Streetfighter, or even Project X Zone.
  • Talvari - April 12, 2013 3:37 p.m.

    Ahh, so many great games and so many memories. Awesome list :D Also god damn farmville >:@
  • taokaka - April 12, 2013 3 p.m.

    I think Uncharted 2 deserves a spot on the list, the reason is that it inspired a plethora of cinematic third person shooters after successfully combining the gameplay concepts of Gears of war with the cinematic action of god of war. Even at last years E3 the general consensus was that the winner was 2009's uncharted 2.
  • closer2192 - April 12, 2013 2:47 p.m.

    I agree with most of the items on this list, although I don't agree with all their placements. I personally think Wii Sports is up too high. Also, I find it interesting that there aren't any non-racing sports games other than Wii Sports on the list when Madden and FIFA are pretty consistently top-5 to top-10 selling games. There must have been some earlier sports game that's played a pivotal role in this development in gaming history.
  • JarkayColt - April 12, 2013 2:54 p.m.

    Technically speaking, Pong is a sports game. And I think that's about as pivotal as you'll get.
  • closer2192 - April 12, 2013 3:44 p.m.

    I mean, NHL 93? One of the early Maddens? NBA Jam?
  • FunkyPickle - April 12, 2013 2:33 p.m.

    Halo 2 is certainly not the weakest game in the trilogy. Not as content packed as Halo 3, but blows Combat Evolved out of the water. Best Multiplayer maps in the series. Doesn't help that Halo CE had a boring corridor-shooter Campaign as well.
  • garnsr - April 12, 2013 2:25 p.m.

    Isn't Shenmue the origin of QTEs? Shouldn't that be the most lasting aspect of the game?
  • BladedFalcon - April 12, 2013 2:34 p.m.

    I think though, that it was the first God of War that popularized QTEs in the way we know them today for most games.
  • MrXLiebezeit - April 12, 2013 5:08 p.m.

    Noo, there were many, MANY more on the SEGA CD. Though I think Shenmue actually did it half decently, those ones.... not so much.
  • garnsr - April 12, 2013 5:19 p.m.

    Are you talking about the games like Time Gal, or Dragon's Lair that had no controls other than directions? I wouldn't consider those QTEs, and I remember people being excited when Yu Suzuki introduced his new system that he called Quick Time Events. That's the earliest use of that kind of control in a game where you can actually move around, but there may have been something earlier. The term definitely started with Shenmue, though.
  • MrXLiebezeit - April 12, 2013 5:23 p.m.

    Yeah, the term definitely started with Shenmue, I'm not denying that. But I can swear there were games that weren't as simple as Time Gal, and Dragon's Lair on the SCD that feature similar gameplay as the QTEs of today. Maybe I'm wrong, I haven't played on a SCD in ages, last time I played on was at an old friends who got one when they were about to be discontinued. Poor SEGA and their crap peripherals.
  • mike2082 - April 13, 2013 6:53 a.m.

    Hehe I still have my Sega stuff and they work (Genesis, Sega CD, and Saturn). Makes me want to pull them down and hook them up again!

Showing 61-80 of 99 comments

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