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Ghostwire Tokyo – release date, PS5 exclusivity, and everything you need to know

GhostWire: Tokyo
(Image credit: Bethesda Softworks)

Ghostwire: Tokyo is a PS5 console exclusive that you won't want to miss. It's an otherworldly mystery and ghost-hunting adventure from Tango Gameworks, the studio responsible for breathing new life into the survival horror genre with The Evil Within. In Ghostwire: Tokyo you'll take to neon-lit streets and battle against The Visitors, masked apparitions that are taking credit for the disappearance of Tokyo's population. 

Announced back in 2019, a Ghostwire: Tokyo release date is finally within reach. We also have a better sense of the magically-enhanced hand-to-hand combat you'll use to fight off the agile spirits and faceless ghosts that are haunting Tokyo, and information on how Bethesda's latest release will make use of exclusive PS5 features like the console's super-fast SSD and the DualSense controller’s adaptive triggers. Read on for everything you need to know about Ghostwire: Tokyo, what will surely be one of 2022's weirdest and most unmissable releases. 

Ghostwire: Tokyo release date

Ghostwire: Tokyo

(Image credit: Bethesda)

The Ghostwire: Tokyo release date is set for Spring 2022. This window was reaffirmed by publisher Bethesda during the PS5 September Showcase and means we should have the game in hand before June 2022. Announced back in 2019, we had long-anticipated that this upcoming action-adventure would launch in 2021, although Tango Gameworks confirmed earlier this year that Ghostwire: Tokyo had been delayed to give its team time to deliver an "experience unlike anything else we've ever made." We'll have to wait a little longer to explore Tango's vision of a haunted Tokyo then, but there's plenty of info to get excited over in the meantime. 

Is Ghostwire: Tokyo a PS5 exclusive?

Ghostwire: Tokyo

(Image credit: Bethesda)

Ghostwire: Tokyo will launch on PS5 and PC when it releases in 2022. Bethesda made the Ghostwire: Tokyo deal with Sony ahead of its acquisition by Xbox, with Microsoft stating that it would honor exclusivity deals made prior to the merger. Ghostwire: Tokyo is in a similar position to Deathloop then, which has made its console debut on PS5 and is expected to launch on Xbox Series X and Xbox Game Pass later next year once a timed-exclusivity window is up. Bethesda is yet to confirm that Ghostwire: Tokyo is indeed a timed-exclusive for PS5, so watch this space. 

Ghostwire: Tokyo story

Ghostwire: Tokyo

(Image credit: Bethesda)

The Ghostwire: Tokyo story takes place in a twisted version of Tokyo. A mysterious fog has descended upon the city, causing 99% of the city's population to disappear – you have been spared by the Visitors, a supernatural threat led by a masked figure known only as Hannya. In Ghostwire: Tokyo it'll be your job to explore the narrow alleyways, neon-lit streets, and underbelly of the cityscape to uncover the truth and bring about peace. But to accomplish that goal, you'll first need to master your ghost-hunting skills and Ethereal Weaving – a combat stance that is best described as karate-meets-magic. 

Is Ghostwire: Tokyo a horror game?

Ghostwire: Tokyo

(Image credit: Bethesda)

Given the pedigree, it would be easy to assume that Ghostwire: Tokyo is going to be a horror game. It is being made by Tango Gameworks after all, the developer responsible for The Evil Within and The Evil Within 2 – the studio head is none other than Resident Evil creator Shinji Mikami. But Ghostwire: Tokyo is not, Bethesda promises, an outright horror. This is the studio's first stab at an action-adventure game, taking its proficiency in building beautiful worlds that are densely atmospheric and merging that with fast-paced, hyper-kinetic combat. We've never seen Tango put anything quite like this out into the world. 

Ghostwire: Tokyo combat

Ghostwire: Tokyo

(Image credit: Bethesda)

Ghostwire: Tokyo is a first-person action game with movements inspired by traditional Kuji-kiri hand gestures. It's been described best as 'karate-meets-magic' and that checks out from what we've seen of it so far, with Tango Gameworks promising an intricate, upgradable combo-based combat system that marries sharp movement with supernatural elemental abilities called Ethereal Weaving. While the studio is known best for third-person shooters, it actually brought Shinichiro Hara in to lead the Ghostwire: Tokyo combat team – a designer who worked on the push-forward combat and Glory Kill system that helped define DOOM (2016).  As a result, Ghostwire: Tokyo will have us taking back the streets of Tokyo by casting upgradable magic with martial arts gestures quite unlike anything we've seen from this team before. 

Ghostwire: Tokyo enemies

Ghostwire: Tokyo

(Image credit: Bethesda)

Ghostwire: Tokyo might not be a horror game, but it sure does have some spooky enemies. Using your Ethereal Weaving, you'll wield the power of fire, wind, and water to take down a wide array of supernatural threats. These include agile and acrobatic spirits that have taken the form of headless school children; faceless ghosts adorned in funeral attire which can deflect attacks with oversized umbrellas; dolls hoisted up into the air on invisible strings, towering foes wielding sharpened scissor blades, little children in yellow raincoats… listen, you get the idea by now. Ghostwire: Tokyo has a whole vibe. 

Tokyo: Ghostwire PS5 features

Ghostwire: Tokyo

(Image credit: Bethesda)

Tango Gameworks is designing Ghostwire: Tokyo to make the most of the PS5. The studio is targeting dynamic 4K with HDR and ray-tracing, as well as support for 3D audio. Bethesda has also promised that Ghostwire: Tokyo will make use of the PS5's SSD storage to deliver "high speed, near-zero loading times" which will make "traversing Ghostwire: Tokyo seamless." Ghostwire: Tokyo will also utilise the DualSense Adaptive Triggers and Haptic feedback to help improve immersion, with the controller rumble showcasing the successful execution of moves in combat and simulating the development of your abilities over time – as your skills get stronger, so too will the haptic response. 

Ghostwire: Tokyo trailer

The latest Ghostwire: Tokyo trailer, revealed as part of the PlayStation Showcase in September 2021, gave us perhaps our best look at the game yet. It introduced us to antagonist Hannya and their many acolytes that are swarming Tokyo. We also got our first look at the protagonist, the mysterious man who was spared from the supernatural event that caused the population to vanish, and a little hint towards the wider narrative. There's a lot going on, but it's well worth a watch – particularly if you're finding the wait for Ghostwire: Tokyo's 2022 release date difficult to bear. 


Josh West

Josh West is Features Editor of GamesRadar+. With over 10 years experience in both online and print journalism, Josh has written for a number of gaming, entertainment, music, and tech publications, including 3D Artist, Edge, gamesTM, iCreate, Metal Hammer, Play, Retro Gamer, and SFX. He holds a BA (Hons) in Journalism and Feature Writing, has appeared on the BBC and ITV to provide expert comment, written for Scholastic books, edited a book for Hachette, and worked as the Assistant Producer of the Future Games Show. In his spare time, Josh plays bass guitar and video games. Years ago, he was in movies and TV shows that you've definitely seen but will never be able to spot him in.