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Phasmophobia ghosts follow voices now, so get used to whispering

Phasmophobia
(Image credit: Kinetic Games)

A new Phasmophobia update lets the ghosts use the sound of your voice to guide their hunting, so you best start whispering if you want to make it back to base alive.

As explained on the official Phasmophobia Twitter account, most folks already assumed that ghosts were listening to our voices to find out where we are, so Kinetic Games was basically like, "Well now that you mention it, that's a great idea."

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Kinetic Games also confirmed that "the voice update is based on how loud your mic is," so the more you can stifle your whimpering and cries for help, the better your chances of survival. Though, the studio notes that the feature is in its experimental stages at the moment, asking players to report any issues should they arise.

To make matters even more dire, the new update also eliminates a few exploits you might've been using to escape from ghosts. A fix for the Grafton level removes the ability to hide behind the wood panel in the storage room, and another fix stops you from walking through some of the exterior walls in the prison level.

Phasmophobia launched on Steam Early Access in 2020 and became an instant hit with streamers and horror fans, to an extent that surprised developer Kinetic Games and led them to change and expand their plans for future updates. "I was originally planning the Early Access to be short... where I just add a few more maps, ghost types and equipment. However, due to the game's popularity, everyone's expectations are increased so I am going to have to reconsider my plans for the game's future," the developer told IGN at the time.

Here's how Phasmophobia turned the horror-averse Alyssa Mercante into a bonafide fear junkie.

Jordan Gerblick

After scoring a degree in English from ASU, I worked in - *shudders* - content management while freelancing for places like SFX Magazine, Screen Rant, Game Revolution, and MMORPG. Now, as GamesRadar's Arizona-based Staff Writer, I'm responsible for managing the site's western regional executive branch, AKA my apartment, and writing about whatever horror game I'm too afraid to finish.