Warning: BioShock's Secrets Revealed

MAJOR, GAME RUINING SPOILERS! Read only if you want to know EVERYTHING

Warning: This page contains major BioShock spoilers. Proceed at your own game-ruining risk!










Spoiler #7

Andrew Ryan begs you to kill him

For half of BioShock, your primary goal is to kill Andrew Ryan. He's an intimidating, oppressive presence in Rapture. You hear only his taunting voice and see only his lower face as it flickers on static-filled television screens. As the creator, visionary and leader of this former utopia, he seems to be everywhere.

Yet when you finally meet the figurehead, he appears small and ordinary. Just an average man, pacing back and forth in his office. He talks to you instead of attacking you, and the only weapon he carries is a golf club.

A golf club with which he commands you to strike him down. Go ahead - our video reveals the disturbing death scene in all its gruesome glory.

Why does he do it? As a man accustomed to power, perhaps Andrew Ryan simply wanted the satisfaction of choosing where and how he reached his end. Better to die at his son's hands than Fontaine's.

Warning: This page contains major BioShock spoilers. Proceed at your own game-ruining risk!










Spoiler #7

Andrew Ryan begs you to kill him

For half of BioShock, your primary goal is to kill Andrew Ryan. He's an intimidating, oppressive presence in Rapture. You hear only his taunting voice and see only his lower face as it flickers on static-filled television screens. As the creator, visionary and leader of this former utopia, he seems to be everywhere.

Yet when you finally meet the figurehead, he appears small and ordinary. Just an average man, pacing back and forth in his office. He talks to you instead of attacking you, and the only weapon he carries is a golf club.

A golf club with which he commands you to strike him down. Go ahead - our video reveals the disturbing death scene in all its gruesome glory.

Why does he do it? As a man accustomed to power, perhaps Andrew Ryan simply wanted the satisfaction of choosing where and how he reached his end. Better to die at his son's hands than Fontaine's.