War Front strategy guide - unit analysis

Every unit poked and prodded for strengths and weaknesses

Helicopter
Cost: $1210
Army Points: 3
Hit Points: 220

Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the units you deploy into the various battle zones is a key component of success. Here%26rsquo;s a look at the offensive units you%26rsquo;ll be able to deploy when controlling the Allied, German, and Russian forces, and how they stack up in terms of cost and effectiveness. And while War Front is based on an alternate history, many of the units in the game either saw combat or were on the verge of entering the fight when the war ended. With that in mind, we%26rsquo;ve included a little historical background on many of them to give you a better idea of the fighting machines that dueled in the greatest conflict humanity has ever known. Also check out the other sections of our guide, including general tips and strategies, and complete Allied and German mission walkthroughs. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 0 ---*---*---*--- Allied Forces Strength: Air Power Motto: %26ldquo;Death From Above%26rdquo; Most Appropriate For: Novice to Intermediate Skill Levels MG Infantry Cost: $100 Army Points: 1 Hit Points: 60 The basic foot soldier of the Allied forces can be produced cheaply and fairly quickly. MG Infantry are effective against enemy infantry and light vehicles. Pros: With the %26ldquo;Capture Buildings%26rdquo; ability upgrade, you can use MG Infantry to seize both buildings and vehicles. Cons: Highly vulnerable to any type of weapon-bearing vehicle, and it%26rsquo;s a good thing they can capture buildings: Their lack of firepower means it takes them quite a while to bring down any enemy structures. Bottom Line: One of the few Tech Level 1 units you%26rsquo;ll still be producing at the end of the game because of its Capture Buildings skill. Bazooka Trooper Cost: $185 Army Points: Hit Points: 80 The firepower wielded by Bazooka Troopers allows them to take out both installations and lightly armored enemy vehicles. Pros: They can be produced and deployed rapidly, and when several are combined for a massed assault they can quickly destroy tanks or demolish buildings. Cons: The advantages of a massed attack are offset by their vulnerability to artillery and tank fire when they%26rsquo;re packed into a tight group. Bottom Line: Decent preliminary defense against light armor. Probably most effective when dropped behind enemy lines to destroy unprotected buildings. Ranger Cost: $300 Army Points: 2 Hit Points: 75 Rangers are the Allied army%26rsquo;s elite foot soldiers, equal to any enemy troops they might face. Pros: They either kill or heavily wound enemies with a single shot, have a much longer firing range than other U.S. infantry, and their High Explosives ability allows them to destroy buildings with satchel charges. Cons: Considerably more expensive than MG Infantry or Bazooka Troopers, and they%26rsquo;re susceptible to enemy fire when placing bombs at a target. Bottom Line: If a building lacks enough protection to prevent a Ranger from planting High Explosives, you could probably use cheaper MF Infantry to capture it. But their long range makes them ideal for protecting a base against enemies attempting sneak attacks to destroy or capture your buildings. Halftrack Cost: $800 Army Points: 2 Hit Points: 210 This speedy truck serves double-duty: It can carry up to 12 soldiers, and wields a machine gun that can take out infantry and light armor. Pros: Cheap and rapidly produced, the Halftrack%26rsquo;s speed and high rate of machine-gun fire makes it a good choice for patrol duty or to eliminate lightly armored mobile artillery units like the Katyusha or Wurfrahmen. Cons: Its speed comes at a price: just a couple of hits from even the lightest enemy tanks will cost you the vehicle. Bottom Line: Excellent for rushing to trouble spots, especially if the threat is infantry or AA vehicles %26mdash; but watch out if it faces anything firing explosive shells. Bofors Cost: $600 Army Points: 2 Hit Points: 200 Bofors was one of the first names in anti-aircraft weaponry%26mdash;so much so that AA guns in general were called Bofors even when they were produced by another manufacturer. Used by both sides during World War II. Pros: The fastest, cheapest way to gain protection against enemy aircraft either at a base or as part of a mobile force. Can also target paratroopers as they descend toward the gun. Cons: Unlike AA guns, they count toward your army limit, and on their own they%26rsquo;re defenseless against any enemy ground forces. Bottom Line: Not quite as effective as its Russian and German counterparts, but it%26rsquo;s still the unit of choice for guarding armor and infantry from airborne attacks as they advance on targets. Matilda Cost: $500 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 200 The main tank of the British army at the outbreak of World War II came in several variations, with the Matilda II playing a key role in the North African campaign. As newer German tanks were produced, however, the Matilda proved much less of a threat, and it was phased out of service by 1943. Pros: Luckily, this Matilda is considerably speedier than its real-life counterpart, and it packs more single-shot firepower than the Halftrack. Cons: It can hold its own against other nations%26rsquo; light tanks, but that%26rsquo;s about it. And its low rate of fire makes it less effective against infantry than the Halftrack%26mdash;which just happens to have 10 more Hit Points to boot. Bottom Line: You probably won%26rsquo;t build too many of these light tanks once you reach Tech Level 2 unless you%26rsquo;re running low on resources and can%26rsquo;t afford something better. Sherman Cost: $1020 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 300 First used in Operation Torch, the Allied invasion of North Africa in November, 1942, the M4 Sherman was the WWII equivalent of the Chrysler K car: It could be manufactured quickly and easily, was reliable in the field, simple to service, and its chassis served as the basis for thousands of other armored vehicles. Early-model Shermans could be easily %26ldquo;brewed up%26rdquo; by German Panther and Tiger tanks, quickly earning them nicknames like %26ldquo;Tommycookers%26rdquo; and %26ldquo;Ronsons%26rdquo; (after the cigarette lighter guaranteed to light up on the first attempt). In War Front, the Sherman is still inferior to its Russian and German counterparts, but not to that extent. Pros: Its firepower is isn%26rsquo;t top-notch, but it can roll with the punches thrown by enemy tanks. Once the Sherman is available, you%26rsquo;ll probably never click on the Matilda icon again. Cons: None Bottom Line: Could be better%26hellip;but it could be a lot worse. Calliope Sherman Cost: $1562 Army Points: 5 Hit Points: 300 By mounting a rack containing 60 4.5%26rdquo; rockets atop a Sherman, the Allies transformed an infantry support tank into a self-propelled artillery piece, dubbed the %26ldquo;Rocket Launcher T34 Calliope.%26rdquo; The shock effect of this many rockets hitting an enemy location is hard to underestimate, and the Calliope played an important part in the breakthrough in the Po Valley in Italy. Pros: Unlike the standard Sherman, it can lob rockets onto any specified location, be it a spot on the ground or an enemy building. Cons: It might be built on the same chassis as the Sherman, but the Calliope takes a lot more damage from enemy fire. What do you think would happen if an HE round hit that rack of rockets? Bottom Line: One of the coolest-looking units in the game, but you can produce two Priests for less money and get similar results%26mdash;and at the cost of only one more Army Point. Pershing Cost: $1617 Army Points: 6 Hit Points: 450 Officially known as the T26 and called the %26ldquo;Pershing,%26rdquo; this was originally designed as a heavy tank and did not reach the battlefield in Europe until near the end of the fighting, in February 1945. Its much more powerful gun made it clearly superior to even %26ldquo;upgunned%26rdquo; Shermans, and it could go toe-to-toe with the German Tiger I and Panthers it faced. It eventually saw service in the Korean Conflict, where it chalked up admirable kill rates against Russian-made T-34/85s deployed by the North Koreans. Pros: You can%26rsquo;t deploy a heavier hitter than the Pershing, and it looks like even better when you compared it to the price of the Calliope (even if it doesn%26rsquo;t have artillery capability). Cons: Long production time, can only be made at Tech Level 3, and still not a match for the super-tanks wielded by the Russians and Germans. Bottom Line: Dollar for dollar, it%26rsquo;s your best card in the tank game%26mdash;why not play it? Priest Cost: $700 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 200 This American-made self-propelled artillery piece was designated the M7, but the British dubbed because the ring surrounding its .50-caliber machine gun resembled a pulpit (and also because it replaced the %26ldquo;Bishop%26rdquo;). Pros: Unlike tanks, the Priest can be ordered to bombard a specific spot%26mdash;and it doesn%26rsquo;t need to have line of sight to do it. It has the longest range of any Tech Level 1 or 2 vehicle in the Allied arsenal. Cons: Because of its arcing trajectory, the Priest is vulnerable to fast-moving tanks: the target could have already moved by the time the Priest%26rsquo;s shell reaches its destination. Bottom Line: Great for demolishing buildings or raining fire on a particular spot, but it doesn%26rsquo;t deliver quite the %26ldquo;oomph%26rdquo; you%26rsquo;d like when hitting armored vehicles. You%26rsquo;ll want to keep tanks like the Sherman or Pershing around it for protection as it does its work. M40 Cost: $1254 Army Points: 5 Hit Points: 350 Packing a 155mm gun, the M40 self-propelled artillery vehicle actually saw very little action in World War II, but it was used by Allied forces in Korea and was adapted for later use by the British. It was officially known as the %26ldquo;155mm Gun Motor Carriage M40,%26rdquo; which would probably have been shortened to a catchy nickname like %26ldquo;Priest%26rdquo; or %26ldquo;Bishop%26rdquo; if it had seen more action. Pros: Longer range than the Priest, and with nearly double the armor it can take a lot more abuse than the cheaper artillery unit. Cons: Unavailable until you reach Tech Level 3, and it takes twice as long to produce as a Priest. Bottom Line: By the point in a battle where you can build both Priests and M40s, the latter%26rsquo;s battlefield durability and greater firepower give it the edge even considering its greater cost in resources and AP points. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 1 ---*---*---*---Helicopter Cost: $1210 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 220 Although the Germans developed the first truly practical helicopter in 1936 and the aircraft was put to use by several combatant countries in World War II, it role in combat was not fully realized until decades later. In War Front, however, the accelerated development of experimental military equipment means you%26rsquo;ll have access to this unique and multi-faceted warbird. Pros: As the only aircraft that Heroes can enter, helicopters can play a pivotal role at critical points in a battle by delivering them and extra ground troops to a vital location. And while Call-In Paratroop drops can also deliver various types of ground troops, they aren%26rsquo;t able to return fire like the Helicopter can. Cons: It%26rsquo;s much slower than other aircraft and is highly vulnerable to AA fire. Unlike in real life, there are no survivors when these choppers go down%26mdash;bad news if a Hero is on board! Bottom Line: A special-use unit that can prove specially useful in certain situation, provided you keep an eye on it as it wends its way to its destination. P-51 Mustang Cost: $800 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 210 There were faster and more heavily armed interceptors in World War II, but the general consensus is that the P-51 Mustang was the finest fighter plane of the war. The P-51H variant%26rsquo;s top speed was nearly 500 mph; the P-51D had a range of over 1,600 miles with drop tanks; both were equipped with up to six .50-caliber machine guns, and the P-51D was capable of carrying air-to-ground rockets. Pros: Super-fast and nimble, the Mustang can deliver brutal strafing runs against enemy infantry and light vehicles, easily dealing with any enemy interceptor it faces. Cons: Feeble against hard targets like bunkers, armored vehicles, and buildings. Bottom Line: Besides strafing incoming infantry, Mustangs are perfectly suited as escorts for fighter-bombers or bombers, or to lure AA fire away from either of them. P-38 Lightning Cost: $990 Army Points: 4 Hit Points: 350 The first warplane designed by the Lockheed Corporation was a doozy. Although its top speed (360 mph) was not breathtaking, its nose-mounted armaments packed a wallop: four .50-caliber machine guns and a 20mm cannon, augmented by rocket launchers and/or bombs. The Germans called it the %26ldquo;Twin-Tailed Devil%26rdquo;%26mdash;and probably prayed to God every time they saw it descend in a tactical support role to devastate airfields, rail lines, and troop transports. Pros: Like the Mustang in the Interceptor class, neither the Russians or Germans can produce a Fighter-Bomber close to the Lightning. It%26rsquo;s especially deadly once you research the Air-To-Ground Capability: a single Lightning can bring down defensive bunkers and other smaller buildings. Cons: None Bottom Line: Consider the Lightning the most essential tool in your tactical weapons arsenal! Call-In B-17Cost: $1200Tech Level Required: 1 Without a doubt the most famous bomber of World War II, the B-17 was nicknamed the “Flying Fortress” thanks to its multitude of .50-caliber machine-gun turrets (the B-17G had 13 in all). Unfortunately, fortresses were apparently much stronger on terra firma than in the air: without fighter support over German soil, B-17 squadrons suffered appalling casualty rates early in the war. Still, this is the quintessential WWII bomber. Pros: You can gain access to this vital strategic weapon very early in the game, and it can eliminate strongholds that would otherwise block the advance of your ground forces. Cons: Quite susceptible to AA fire. Bottom Line: Cheap enough to chance on a deep run into enemy territory, but best used when you know that AA defenses along its flight path are at a minimum. Call-In Aphrodite BomberCost: $1500Tech Level Required: 2 Normally, the Allies wouldn’t consider this type of weapon, even though it delivers mighty destruction in its wake. But the Germans’ frightening breed of high-tech weapons has called for new tactics, and advances in remote-control technology has turned this into a thoroughly viable—and highly devastating—tactical alternative. Pros: This remote-controlled heavy bomber is laden with explosives…and it’s guaranteed to reach its target regardless of the damage it takes on the way. Cons: You can’t build it until you reach Tech Level 2, but then again good things come to those who wait. Bottom Line: Just another reason why air power is the strong suit of the Allied forces. Call-In Earthquake BombCost: $2500Tech Level Required: 3 Though the B-17 might have earned the most glory in WWII, the Lancaster played a vital role in the Allied victory in the European theater. It was the bomber that carried the “Earthquake Bomb,” also known as the “Grand Slam”—a bomb designed on the principle that explosive energy packs a much great punch released in compressed area (underground) than in open areas (above or at ground level). At 22,000 pounds, the Earthquake Bomb represented a weight nearly three times the maximum bomb load of a Flying Fortress. Pros: The devastation is immense, and the resulting crater slows down vehicles and infantry attempting to traverse it. Cons: Like the B-17, it too is vulnerable to AA fire. Bottom Line: Worth clearing out a path for — but make sure your troops get out of the vicinity before this monster plows into the ground. Call-In Nuclear StrikeCost: $4000Tech Level Required: 3 You probably already know the impact of a tactical nuclear device, and if you don’t you can probably guess: major, mind-blowing devastation. War Front doesn’t depict the effects of a true, hydrogen-based nuclear weapon, but rather what one would expect from an atomic bomb designed for tactical use. Pros: Nothing in the immediate vicinity will survive more than a few seconds; the shock wave will rattle buildings and vehicles outside the blast zone; and the bombed area will emit poisonous radiation for a brief period after the initial detonation. Cons: It costs a pretty penny, but fortunately the bombers that deliver the payload are more adept at dodging or absorbing enemy fires than the B-17s and Lancasters delivering less-powerful weapons. Bottom Line: Use it when you can. ‘Nuff said. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 2 ---*---*---*--- German ForcesStrength: Armored ForcesMotto: “Blood and Iron”Most Appropriate For: Intermediate to Advanced Skill Levels Wehrmacht InfantryCost: $100Army Points: 1Hit Points: 60 While no one questions the bravery, courage or effort of other infantry in World War II, it’s almost universally agreed that the Wehrmacht’s foot soldiers were, man for man, the best-trained and most effective in either theater of war. Pros: Like all infantry in War Front, the Wehrmacht units are cheap, quickly produced, and have the capability to capture both buildings and vehicles. Cons: Almost defenseless against armored units, and essentially useless in bringing down enemy structures. Bottom Line: Their ability to capture buildings and be deployed as paratroopers gives them value even when you’re able to make more advanced infantry or armored units. Wehrmacht PanzerfaustCost: $200Army Points: 1Hit Points: 80 These German infantry wield Panzerfausts, which in real life were cheap, disposable, and preloaded anti-tank weapons not to be confused with Panzerschrecks, a reusable bazooka-style weapon. Pros: Inexpensive option for defending against lightly armored enemy units or taking down enemy buildings. Cons: Only slightly more resilient than Wehrmacht Infantry, and when used in close groups to maximize their firepower they’re highly vulnerable to enemy artillery. Bottom Line: Because they can be dropped as paratroops, these units are excellent for pinpoint attacks behind enemy lines to destroy key installations. They also excel at defending bases from similar attacks by the enemy. Jetpack InfantryCost: $400Army Points: 3Hit Points: 75 Although jetpacks are now considered more a novelty item than anything else, the Germans — ever seeking a technological edge in a war where they were outnumbered and outgunned — actually created a prototype jetpack called the Himmelstürmer. The Himmelstürmer was designed to provide short jumps (up to 60m), mainly to bypass obstacles like minefields, waterways, or defensive fortifications. Pros: Even a small force of Jetpack Infantry can wreak havoc in an enemy base, since they can “jump” to safety — or to a new target — as soon as you see the enemy respond to their presence. They’re also useful on the open battlefield: landing behind large, slow-moving vehicles, they can often inflict great damage or even destroy them before the lumbering enemy can respond. Cons: They move quite slowly on foot, and lack the ability to capture buildings or vehicles. Bottom Line: Maximizing a squad of Jetpack Infantry can be a high-maintenance task—but the rewards can be equally high! ExoskeletonCost: $1050Army Points: 3Hit Points: 300 Like jetpacks, walking war machines were originally the purview of science fiction; unlike jetpacks, they’ve never emerged from that domain — at least not in real life. Pros: Exoskeletons are faster than tanks, eat up few Army Points, and are equipped with both machine guns and rockets, making them one of the most versatile ground units in your arsenal. Cons: Relatively low hit points, especially on a cost-per-dollar basis. Bottom Line:  Their speed and versatility achieve optimal effect when you encircle a major target, preventing several of them from receiving collateral damage from an explosion. They’re also great base defenders. Flammwagen APCCost: $700Army Points: 2Hit Points: 250 German engineers loved to produce specialized variants on existing vehicles, and perhaps no vehicle saw so many iterations as the Sdkfz 251: there were 23 official types, and an unknown number of iterations that weren’t officially classified. The Sdkfz 251/16, or “Flammpanzerwagen,” was a half-track that could carry up 12 soldiers (including the crew) and flamethrowers as well as an MG 34 machine gun. Pros: There’s a reason this costs more than the Panther: it dishes out a lot more damage in a shorter amount of time. Cons: Lightly armored, and it must stop and face the enemy when unleashing its fiery payload — a drawback that exposes it to damage from even weak foes. Bottom Line: Speedy and packing a high-powered punch, the Flammwagen can be rushed to trouble spots in a base-defense role or sent out to eliminate infantry or weaker armored enemies such as the Allied Priest or Russian Katyusha. PantherCost: $530Army Points: 3Hit Points: 210 The Panther, or Panzer V,  was the German response to the Russian T-34, a tank that outgunned and outmaneuvered earlier incarnations of the Panzer line. In the real World War II, it would easily have outclassed the Matilda and T-70, its two enemy equivalents in War Front. Pros: You don’t need to advance to Tech Level 2 to produce it, and it’s the equal of the enemy’s Tech Level 1 tanks. The turreted gun means it doesn’t have to face an enemy in order to fire. Cons: Weak armor doesn’t make up for the speed of this relatively smallish tank. Bottom Line: The Panther in War Front isn’t reflective of its real-life counterpart, so don’t build a lot of them thinking it is. TigerCost: $1000Army Points: 4Hit Points: 390 In the first year it saw action, the Tiger was more noted for mechanical failures than its battlefield prowess. As the war shifted and the Germans went over to the defensive, however, this heavy tank struck fear in the hearts of America, British, and Russian tank crews. Pros: Judged on its costs in terms of resources and Army Points, this is probably the best tank in the German lineup. Cons: The only negatives come when compared to other German tanks: it doesn’t have the firepower and armor of more expensive armored units like the Maus tank or Elephant tank killer. Bottom Line: Can go head-to-head with the Soviet T-34 and outclasses the Allied Sherman. Sonic TankCost: $1500Army Points: 5Hit Points: 250 Although most sonic weapons are aimed at inducing aural pain to incapacitate individual soldiers, a huge sonic blast could — in theory — cause vibrations that would shatter buildings and vehicles. Pros: Get these tanks close enough to a target, and the devastation is massive and fast. The turreted weapon allows the Sonic tank to circle targets while delivering damage. Cons: Getting them there. Sonic tanks have amazingly light armor for a unit carrying this price tag, and it’s awfully disappointing to see them so easily crushed by artillery or even anti-tank infantry. Bottom Line: Great for assaults on enemy bases, provided they’re fronted by heavily armored tanks. MausCost: $1510Army Points: 6Hit Points: 500 The heaviest tank to be developed into a working prototype during World War II, the Maus wielded a mighty 128mm cannon and a 75mm coaxial gun and sported steel armor that was 240mm thick in some places. If it had been used in the war, its weight would have been too great for many bridges. The Germans planned for it to ford rivers or, if they were too deep, to submerge and cross on the bottom, using snorkels for air and cables attached to another Maus for electrical power. Pros: Super-heavy armor gives it staying power, and that big cannon gives it major killing power. You can’t ask for more in a tank. Cons: Slower than the Tiger, so it’s not well-suited for fast-moving operations; it also takes longer to produce Bottom Line: This is the tank to build if you have the resources, time, and are planning a straightforward assault. ElephantCost: $1520Army Points: 6Hit Points: 450 A major component of WWII tank-warfare doctrine was that certain vehicles were designated as “tank killers” — essentially self-propelled anti-tank gun platforms. This was the role of the Elephant (“Elefant” in German). It was initially called the “Ferdinand” after its designer, Ferdinand Porsche, but after some design changes it was officially called the Elephant on Hitler’s orders. (Note: A strict vegetarian, Hitler often remarked to acquaintances that the elephant was the strongest of all land animals, yet ate no meat.) Pros: Delivers a mighty wallop against even the largest enemy tanks, and is well-armored. Cons: Like nearly all anti-tank vehicles in World War II, the Elephant lacks a turret and must directly face its opponent when attacking. Not surprisingly, it’s also slow. Bottom Line: Pair it up with the Maus, Hummel, and some AA vehicles to create a powerful and well-rounded armored battalion. WurfrahmenCost: $750Army Points: 2Hit Points: 260 The chassis of the Sdkfz 251 is again put to good use, this time as a mobile rocket launcher. The Wurfrahmen 40 featured side-mounted rocket launchers, while the Wurfrahmen auf Infanterieschlepper sported a rear-mounted frame for launching rockets and resembles the unit seen in War Front.. Pros: Cheap, long-range artillery unit that can be ordered to bombard any spot on the battlefield. A great choice for mobile base defense because it doesn’t drain valuable power supplies. Cons: A bit thin in terms of armor, and because it is artillery its projectiles take a while to reach the target. Bottom Line: An excellent value in terms of resources and production time. You’ll probably be using this even when the Hummel is available. HummelCost: $1225Army Points: 5Hit Points: 350 The fast pace of blitzkrieg combat necessitated the need for self-propelled artillery, and thus was born the Hummel. It offered the firepower of traditional artillery, but could also move fast enough to keep up with Panzer forces that were spearheading breakthroughs in enemy lines. Pros: A true champion when it comes to reducing enemy buildings to rubble. Cons: Neither its ammunition or its howitzer are suited for combat against moving vehicles. Bottom Line: Although it can absorb more damage than the Wurfrahmen, the Hummel still needs the protection of other armored units (or significant numbers of ground troops). WirbelwindCost: $600Army Points: 2Hit Points: 210 Built using the Panzer IV chassis, the Wirbelwind was equipped with four rapid-firing AA guns. Although relatively few Wirbelwinds were produced during the war, they were known to be used against Allied infantry — an ability that is not reproduced in War Front. Pros: Highly economical anti-air defense option that doesn’t drain power supplies. Cons: Unlike AA Bunkers, they’re vulnerable even to enemy infantry, and they count toward your Army limit. Bottom Line: A quick, easy solution for anti-aircraft defense at your base early in the game, and almost an essential for any mobile armored force. RheintochterCost: $1260Army Points: 3Hit Points: 150 German arms designers and manufacturers were known for ideas ahead of their time, and the Rheintochter is one of them. Although it never was deployed during the war, the Rheintochter was a much more simple version (it relied on human control for flight and detonation) of the surface-to-air missiles developed in the 1950s and 1960s. Pros: It’s a “one shot, one kill” device: it never misses, and the target always goes down. Cons: Long reload time and weak armor. Bottom Line: Mix them in with Wirbelwinds for a mobile, powerful AA system. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 3 ---*---*---*--- Me 262Cost: $930Army Points: 3Hit Points: 200 If not for Adolf Hitler’s insistence that the Me 262 be developed as a bomber, it might have entered the war much sooner — and that could have had a major impact on the outcome of the air war over Germany. Instead, the first operational jet fighter didn’t see action until August, 1944, and by then the massive number of Allied bombers meant it had to focus on them rather on dogfighting. Pros: A speedy interceptor that matches up well against enemy fighters, and it can put a major hurt on bombers. Cons: Fairly expensive, and its ground-support role is limited to attacking infantry and light armor. Bottom Line: Despite its limitations, you should always have a few of these at your disposal to protect your Stukas from Mustangs and Yak-9s. StukaCost: $1100Army Points: 4Hit Points: 300 For thousands of Allied soldiers, the Stuka’s trademark siren meant it was time to take cover. But the German dive bomber earned its deadly reputation early in the war, when the Luftwaffe had unchallenged air superiority. When improved Allied fighters arrived, the Stuka’s slow speed and sluggish maneuverability led to extremely high loss rates in the last two to three years of the war. Pros: An adequate ground-attack aircraft, especially adept at hitting moving targets. Cons: Like the Me 262, it’s fairly expensive for its class; unlike the Allied P-38 Lightning, there’s no way to upgrade its bomb-only capability. Bottom Line: Just as in real life, the Stuka is not up to par with the ground-support airplanes of the Allies or Russia. Giant ZeppelinCost: $5000Army Points: 5Hit Points: 1000 In the first few years of World War I, Zeppelins were able to drop their bombs almost at will over English soil, but the arrival of faster fighters and incendiary ammo rendered the Zeppelins obsolete. The Giant Zeppelin in War Front is a rigid airship with high-powered cannons and strong armor to protect against fire from AA guns and enemy fighters. Pros: The cannons mounted on the Giant Zeppelin can easily take out super-heavy tanks fielded by the Allies and Russians, and is invaluable in reducing major buildings. Cons: This lumbering craft has a high number of hit points, but unfortunately they bleed away rather quickly when enemy AA guns train their sights on the big target. Bottom Line: Perfect as a heavily armed “guardian angel” traveling above an armored formation that’s equipped with AA vehicles to protect it from enemy fighters. Call-In Junkers BomberCost: $1200Tech Level Required: 1 Though perhaps most famed for the Ju 87 Stuka, Junkers manufactured a slew of aircraft for Germany, particularly in the bomber and transport classes. The six-engine bomber depicted in War Front resembles the Ju 390, a prototype with a range of over 6,000 miles. Pros: Can be built at Tech Level 1, and it delivers damage to a fairly wide area. Cons: Interceptors can provide protection from enemy fighters, but the slow Junkers can be brought down rather quickly by ground-based AA fire. Bottom Line: Always send along Me 262s to not only protect against enemy fighters, but also draw away AA fire from this large plane. Call-In Horten BomberCost: $2000Tech Level Required: 2 The Luftwaffe always seemed to have great designs in the works, but the vast majority never made it into production. Such was the case with the Horten 229, a jet-powered “flying wing” bomber that was the forerunner of today’s B-2 Stealth bomber. Pros: The extra money you spend for the Horten rather than the Junkers is worth it: this bomber can take much more damage than the Junkers and still deliver the goods. Cons: Despite the extra armor, the Horten can still be brought down by fire from AA guns and interceptors; you must reach Tech Level 2 before you can call in the Horten. Bottom Line: Unless you’re strapped for resources, you should always opt for the Horten over the Junkers. V1/V2Cost: V1 Launch Pad $3000, $4000 to upgrade to V2Tech Level Required: 2 for V1, 3 for V2 upgrade The V1 and V2 are generally considered the world’s first guided missile and first ballistic missile, respectively. Although their accuracy was poor, their ability to strike without warning (or very little warning, in the case of the V-1) gave the Allies incentive to seek out and destroy their launch sites, diverting forces that would otherwise be used in the move into Germany. Pros: Neither the V1 or V2 can be brought down by AA fire. Cons: A V2 launch not only carries considerable resources costs, but also the time spent reaching Tech Level 3. And while the V1 is more accurate than the V2, there’s no guarantee that either will hit the precise point you target. Bottom Line: A V1 or V2 blast can flatten a large area and deflate an opponent’s morale. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 4 ---*---*---*--- Russian ForcesStrength: InfantryMotto: “Power In Unity”Most Appropriate For: Intermediate and Advanced Skill Levels Red Army InfantryCost: $100Army Points: 1Hit Points: 60 How many men could the Soviets deploy into battle? Consider this: by December 1, 1941, the Russians suffered between four and five million casualties — but after all that they managed to have 280 rifle and cavalry divisions and 44 tank or mechanized brigades in the field for a counterattack. About 500,000 men a month were drafted into the war until its end. Pros: There’s nothing that elevates these troopers over the Allied and German soldiers, but they’re produced slightly more quickly — and when you’re producing a lot, “slightly” matters. Cons: The same as with any infantry unit: they’re fodder for armored units and practically useless against buildings. Bottom Line: Red Army Infantry can prove useful throughout a battle because they can capture buildings and vehicles, and they are the only ground troops available for paratroop drops. Molotov InfantryCost: $150Army Points: 1Hit Points: 70 Ironically, Molotov Cocktails were first used by the forces of Francisco Franco’s forces in the Spanish Civil War—forces supported by Nazi Germany. Their next major role came in the Russo-Finnish war when they were used not by the Russians, but by the Finns: they sarcastically nicknamed the homemade petrol bombs “Molotov Cocktails” because Soviet politician Vyacheslav Molotov claimed the Russian planes dropping bombs were really dispensing food. Pros: They cost 50% more than Red Army infantry units, but do considerably more damage against any type of vehicle or building they attack. Cons: None. Bottom Line: Consider these lowly soldiers an integral part of your strategy — even one can do significant damage before being killed. Red Army MedicCost: $250Army Points: 2Hit Points: 50 The Soviets immediately termed the war against the German invaders as a “Great Patriotic War,” and despite years of oppression and brutality the vast majority of the Russian people chose their Motherland over collusion with the Nazis—not knowing the Nazis would have killed them regardless. Huge numbers of volunteers, many of them women, tended the Soviet wounded, and fighting such a brutal war on their own soil provided the Red Army troops a bit of reassurance their Nazi counterparts could never hope for. Pros: Medic units automatically heal wounded units in their vicinity, which means they survive and advance in experience level—making them even more deadly to the enemy. Cons: They’re doctors, not soldiers, damn it—which is a Star Trek way of saying they have no offensive capabilities whatsoever. You also have to reach Tech Level 2 to train them. Bottom Line: Expensive for infantry units, but you should definitely produce several to accompany soldiers you send into battle. KomissarCost: $210Army Points: 1Hit Points: 75 Although some Soviet apologists will argue the specifics, the fact remains: komissars were often positioned near the front line to ensure Soviet troops didn’t desert. Their deterrent? An execution on the spot. In one recorded incident, a divisional commander at Stalingrad gathered his men, gave a speech on the need for courage—then walked down the front line of the formation and shot every tenth man in the head. Now that’s motivation! Pros: His pistol deals a great deal of damage, and boosts the rate of fire of troops around him. Cons: Slightly expensive. Bottom Line: The Soviet army kept them with their troops, and look at the results. Do the same. PartisansCost: $1500 ($300 per Partisan)Army Points: 5Hit Points: 50 [Note: Partisans are not produced at installations, but we include them here because they are infantry units.] The Nazis assumed the Soviet people would rise in revolt against a regime that brutally oppressed them. That assumption would have been correct if the Nazis hadn’t brutalized the Russians on an even more barbaric scale, and the role partisans played in the defeat of the German invaders can hardly be understated. Pros: Partisans can appear anywhere on the map...even in places where the “fog of war” is still in place and you have no intelligence about what’s there. Cons: You can’t produce them one at a time, so if you’re short of resources you might have to wait for the opportunity to insert these guerilla warriors behind enemy lines. Bottom Line: Consider yourself lucky: the Allies and Germans have nothing that matches the stealth ability of these freedom fighters! Vodka DealerCost: $330Army Points: 2Hit Points: 50 First things first: there were no “vodka dealers” per se in the Soviet Army. But Red Army soldiers did have a penchant for the clear liquor, and as anyone who’s imbibed more than a moderate amount knows, it does give you a feeling of invincibility. Pros: Doesn’t get much better than this: any infantry unit in the Vodka Dealer’s radius cannot be killed. Cons: Relatively low hit points…perhaps he should drink some of his own stock! Bottom Line: Like the Medic and Komissar, consider the Vodka Dealer an essential part of any infantry squad you send into battle. ZIS 42Cost: $720Army Points: 2Hit Points: 150 The Zis 42 was a half-track vehicle typically used in a cargo-transportation role in World War II. Pros: Highly effective against infantry, and its troop-carrying capacity (12) gives it added value. Cons: Very light armor, especially compared to enemy APCs. Bottom Line: There are probably better units you can spend resources on than this one. APC MoleCost: $1350Army Points: 3Hit Points: 250 The term “mole” usually applies to a spy, but in this case the term is literal: the APC mole burrows underground and digs a tunnel to the target destination. Needless to say, this technology did not exist in World War II—or if it did, someone really dropped the ball on using it. Pros: Carries up to 10 troops and can pop up anywhere on the map. Cons: The vehicle itself is defenseless. Bottom Line: Coordinate an attack with an APC Mole filled with Molotov Infantry, Komissars, and Vodka dealers along with Partisans, and you’ve caused a major headache for the enemy. T-70Cost: $360Army Points: 3Hit Points: 180 If the Sherman was the K car of World War II tanks, the T-70 was the Mini-Cooper: fast but undergunned, it still served a role in the Soviet war effort because it was easy to produce. The success of the T-34—and the way that tank warfare evolved to encompass many more tank-on-tank battles—spelled the demise of this little spitfire. Pros: Cheap, cheap, cheap. Cons: You get what you pay for: the T-70 has the lowest hit points of any Tech Level 1 Tank. Bottom Line: You might need to build some, but don’t get carried away and build too many just because you haven’t hit Tech Level 2 yet. T-34Cost: $760Army Points: 4Hit Points: 270 When the Germans invaded the Soviet Union in 1941, the last thing they expected was a tank that not only matched their finest armored beast, but also surpassed it in every way. Some German tanks at the end of the war might have outgunned the T-34, but for the bulk of the conflict it was the standard by which all medium tanks were judged. Pros: An inexpensive tank that can square off with anything the enemy forces can throw at it. Cons: The cheap resource price comes at the expense of one extra Army Point over enemy equivalents. It doesn’t sound like much, but it can add up if you’re cranking them out for a big armored assault. Bottom Line: At this price, you can afford to make them and say to hell with the extra Army Point. Ice SpitterCost: $960Army Points: 4Hit Points: 250 We are all familiar with “dry ice,” a substance cold enough to cause frostbite on contact with skin. Given the incentive to create new superweapons that could turn the tide of war—coupled with the Russian weather—would it be surprising to see a weapon that pushes dry ice from the realm of commercial use into the role of an offensive weapon? Pros: When an Ice Spitter attacks, everyone stops to take notice—because they can’t move even if they wanted to. Works on buildings as well as vehicles. Cons: Aside from freezing objects in place, the Ice Spitter does no damage. Bottom Line: Use it in conjunction with even weak units like the T-70 tank, the Zis 42, or Molotov Infantry: once an object is frozen, it tends to break up easily when hot lead hits it! IS-3 StalinCost: $1152Army Points: 6Hit Points: 400 When the Soviets saw the new Panther and Tiger tanks deployed by the Germans at the Battle of Kursk in 1943, they knew they needed something with greater firepower and more armor than the T-34. This eventually led to the development of the “Iosif Stalin tank,” or IS series. The IS-2 saw action in World War II, while the IS-3—with its trademark rounded turret and angled front hull—was first shown to western observers at the Allied Victory Parade in Berlin in September, 1945. Pros:  Much heavier armor gives the IS 3 greater survivability than the Tiger, and its gun deals out a lot more damage. Cons: Slower than the T-34, and you must upgrade your War Factories to produce them. Bottom Line: An essential unit once the enemy is able to produce heavy tanks. Kharkov RampagerCost: $1600Army Points: 7Hit Points: 1800 As the German situation grew more desperate and the Nazis were constantly on the defensive, they turned to ever-larger vehicles wielding massive guns and sporting amazingly thick armor in the hopes they could stand up to the Russian onslaught. The Kharkov Rampager is a hypothetical response to German prototypes like the Maus: its stupendously thick armor means it can absorb incredible amounts of punishment and still continue to knock out enemy tanks and artillery. Pros: The armor is so thick, you can pretty much send this behemoth straight into enemy fire and know it will take down more than its share of enemies before it’s destroyed. Use the Rampage skill to increase its killing capacity even more (best utilized when the tank is dug in). Cons: Slow movement and turning means more nimble units can get in many hits before the Rampager is able to respond. Bottom Line: German and Allied commanders will curse when they see this giant lumbering toward their forces. ZSU-37Cost: $480Army Points: 2Hit Points: 190 Talk about a second-hand design: the Zsu 37 was built using the SU-76 chassis, which in turn was built using a lengthened T-70 chassis. Developed late in the war, when German air superiority had flagged. Pros: Like many Soviet units, it’s cheaper than its Allied and German cousins, and it performs better than the Bofors. Cons: Thin armor makes it more vulnerable to enemy fire. Bottom Line: An inexpensive, quick way to provide stopgap AA defense at a base, and a crucial part of any armored battalion. KatyushaCost: $640Army Points: 3Hit Points: 150 Perhaps no images are more associated with Soviet firepower in World War II than footage of rockets screaming from Katyusha launchers. The Germans nicknamed them the Katyusha the “Stalin Organ,” and the rocket-launcher assembly itself could be mounted on almost anything: tractors, flatbed trucks, and even gunboats. Pros: The Katyusha is quickly produced and boasts an amazingly long range, allowing you to drop fire on distant enemy vehicles and fortifications. It also has a surprisingly fast rate of fire. Cons: Flatbed trucks are great for hauling stuff, but they don’t hold up too well when fired upon: it only takes one or two hits from a tank or several Bazookas/Panzerfausts to finish them off. Bottom Line: It’s difficult to imagine this much firepower for such a low cost. You’ll still be producing this Tech Level 1 unit at the end of even very long battles. Moving Giant TurretCost: $1600Army Points: 6Hit Points: 1300 There is quite possibly nothing as unnerving to an enemy as a long-range artillery attack. One moment, troops and tanks are moving into position; the next they lay broken and shattered, crushed without warning. Pros: The range of the Moving Giant Turret is simply mind-boggling, which means it can take your opponent quite a while just to figure out where the barrage is originating from—and then he has to figure out how to get units there to stop it. Cons: This long-range deathbringer moves even more slowly than the Kharkov Rampager, and it must stop in order to fire. Particularly vulnerable to anti-tank infantry or light, speedy vehicles like the Flammwagen or Halftrack. Bottom Line: As a Soviet commander, you have no better tool than this for bringing down important enemy structures. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 5 ---*---*---*--- YakovlevCost: $900Army Points: 3Hit Points: 180 There were several variations of this single-engine fighter produced over the course of the war: in War Front, you’ll be deploying the famous Yak-9. Even though German bombing raids hampered production, the plane proved to be highly successful. Pros: Can escort Sturmoviks on bombing raids to protect them from enemy fighters, as well as lure AA guns into not firing on vulnerable Tupolev or Winter’s Breath Call-In Bombers. Cons: Weak armor means even fire from enemy interceptors is enough to bring these nimble planes crashing to the ground. Bottom Line: One reason you should focus on ground forces in your quest for victory. SturmovikCost: $1100Army Points: 4Hit Points: 280 Just like the Russian people, Soviet industry answered the call to battle when the Germans invaded. One of its most impressive feats was the Ilyushin Sturmovik: between the Il-2 and Il-10, over 36,000 were built. The Il-2 is the model featured in War Front. Pros: Can provide quick strikes to enemy fortifications and installations, as well as serve in a ground-attack role against slow-moving enemy armor or infantry formations. Cons: Like the Yakovlev, the Sturmovik’s armor is weak in comparison to enemy fighter-bombers. Bottom Line: Keep some of these available at all times, but building too many is a waste of Army Points better spent on infantry or armored units. Call-In Tupolev BomberCost: $1200Tech Level Required: 1 The Tupolev TB-3 was a four-engine heavy bomber used by the Soviet Air Force in the 1930s and 1940s. Of course, any plane that was in service in the 1930s stood little chance of success by the middle of the war, and after 1942 the Russians pulled them from duty after 1942. Interestingly, the Soviets considered using the TB-3 as a way to airlift small tanks into battle zones. Pros: An inexpensive way to lay waste to a large area of enemy territory. Cons: Slow and unmaneuverable, the TB-3 is especially vulnerable to AA fire. Bottom Line: Make sure you’ve cleared out any sources of AA fire, and try to have some Yakovlevs in the target area to deal with any enemy interceptors that might shoot down this antiquated bomber. Call-In Winters BreathCost: $2500Tech Level Required: 3 With the Ice Spitter technology perfected, the Soviets decided to extend its icy welcome through the use of air delivery. Pros: Its payload instantly freezes everything in an extremely large radius: even buildings are unable to produce units until the ice has melted. Cons: The TB-3 is the bomb platform the Soviets have chosen for the TB-3, so the same disadvantages apply. You also need to reach Tech Level 3 before you can access this weapon. Bottom Line: Don’t waste the resources on this unless you are ready to move in with other units capable of shattering the frozen enemy buildings and vehicles. Call-In Artillery StrikeCost: $2000Tech Level Required: 3 The Call-In Artillery Strike is even more nerve-shattering to your enemies than the devastation of the Moving Giant Turret because there’s nothing they can do stop it (aside from capturing your Radio Station, that is). Pros: The area of destruction is large, and the damage is significant. Cons: Not as accurate as a bombing strike or shelling by the Moving Giant Turret, and the reload time is rather long. Bottom Line: Just imagining your enemies tearing their hair out because there’s nothing they can do to stop this explosive downpour is reason in and of itself to give the order to open fire! Now that you’re an encyclopedia of death, get more tips and tactics, as well as full walkthroughs of the Allied and German campaigns in the rest of our guide.

Although the Germans developed the first truly practical helicopter in 1936 and the aircraft was put to use by several combatant countries in World War II, it role in combat was not fully realized until decades later. In War Front, however, the accelerated development of experimental military equipment means you’ll have access to this unique and multi-faceted warbird.

Pros: As the only aircraft that Heroes can enter, helicopters can play a pivotal role at critical points in a battle by delivering them and extra ground troops to a vital location. And while Call-In Paratroop drops can also deliver various types of ground troops, they aren’t able to return fire like the Helicopter can.

Cons: It’s much slower than other aircraft and is highly vulnerable to AA fire. Unlike in real life, there are no survivors when these choppers go down—bad news if a Hero is on board!

Bottom Line: A special-use unit that can prove specially useful in certain situation, provided you keep an eye on it as it wends its way to its destination.

P-51 Mustang
Cost: $800
Army Points: 3
Hit Points: 210

Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the units you deploy into the various battle zones is a key component of success. Here%26rsquo;s a look at the offensive units you%26rsquo;ll be able to deploy when controlling the Allied, German, and Russian forces, and how they stack up in terms of cost and effectiveness. And while War Front is based on an alternate history, many of the units in the game either saw combat or were on the verge of entering the fight when the war ended. With that in mind, we%26rsquo;ve included a little historical background on many of them to give you a better idea of the fighting machines that dueled in the greatest conflict humanity has ever known. Also check out the other sections of our guide, including general tips and strategies, and complete Allied and German mission walkthroughs. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 0 ---*---*---*--- Allied Forces Strength: Air Power Motto: %26ldquo;Death From Above%26rdquo; Most Appropriate For: Novice to Intermediate Skill Levels MG Infantry Cost: $100 Army Points: 1 Hit Points: 60 The basic foot soldier of the Allied forces can be produced cheaply and fairly quickly. MG Infantry are effective against enemy infantry and light vehicles. Pros: With the %26ldquo;Capture Buildings%26rdquo; ability upgrade, you can use MG Infantry to seize both buildings and vehicles. Cons: Highly vulnerable to any type of weapon-bearing vehicle, and it%26rsquo;s a good thing they can capture buildings: Their lack of firepower means it takes them quite a while to bring down any enemy structures. Bottom Line: One of the few Tech Level 1 units you%26rsquo;ll still be producing at the end of the game because of its Capture Buildings skill. Bazooka Trooper Cost: $185 Army Points: Hit Points: 80 The firepower wielded by Bazooka Troopers allows them to take out both installations and lightly armored enemy vehicles. Pros: They can be produced and deployed rapidly, and when several are combined for a massed assault they can quickly destroy tanks or demolish buildings. Cons: The advantages of a massed attack are offset by their vulnerability to artillery and tank fire when they%26rsquo;re packed into a tight group. Bottom Line: Decent preliminary defense against light armor. Probably most effective when dropped behind enemy lines to destroy unprotected buildings. Ranger Cost: $300 Army Points: 2 Hit Points: 75 Rangers are the Allied army%26rsquo;s elite foot soldiers, equal to any enemy troops they might face. Pros: They either kill or heavily wound enemies with a single shot, have a much longer firing range than other U.S. infantry, and their High Explosives ability allows them to destroy buildings with satchel charges. Cons: Considerably more expensive than MG Infantry or Bazooka Troopers, and they%26rsquo;re susceptible to enemy fire when placing bombs at a target. Bottom Line: If a building lacks enough protection to prevent a Ranger from planting High Explosives, you could probably use cheaper MF Infantry to capture it. But their long range makes them ideal for protecting a base against enemies attempting sneak attacks to destroy or capture your buildings. Halftrack Cost: $800 Army Points: 2 Hit Points: 210 This speedy truck serves double-duty: It can carry up to 12 soldiers, and wields a machine gun that can take out infantry and light armor. Pros: Cheap and rapidly produced, the Halftrack%26rsquo;s speed and high rate of machine-gun fire makes it a good choice for patrol duty or to eliminate lightly armored mobile artillery units like the Katyusha or Wurfrahmen. Cons: Its speed comes at a price: just a couple of hits from even the lightest enemy tanks will cost you the vehicle. Bottom Line: Excellent for rushing to trouble spots, especially if the threat is infantry or AA vehicles %26mdash; but watch out if it faces anything firing explosive shells. Bofors Cost: $600 Army Points: 2 Hit Points: 200 Bofors was one of the first names in anti-aircraft weaponry%26mdash;so much so that AA guns in general were called Bofors even when they were produced by another manufacturer. Used by both sides during World War II. Pros: The fastest, cheapest way to gain protection against enemy aircraft either at a base or as part of a mobile force. Can also target paratroopers as they descend toward the gun. Cons: Unlike AA guns, they count toward your army limit, and on their own they%26rsquo;re defenseless against any enemy ground forces. Bottom Line: Not quite as effective as its Russian and German counterparts, but it%26rsquo;s still the unit of choice for guarding armor and infantry from airborne attacks as they advance on targets. Matilda Cost: $500 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 200 The main tank of the British army at the outbreak of World War II came in several variations, with the Matilda II playing a key role in the North African campaign. As newer German tanks were produced, however, the Matilda proved much less of a threat, and it was phased out of service by 1943. Pros: Luckily, this Matilda is considerably speedier than its real-life counterpart, and it packs more single-shot firepower than the Halftrack. Cons: It can hold its own against other nations%26rsquo; light tanks, but that%26rsquo;s about it. And its low rate of fire makes it less effective against infantry than the Halftrack%26mdash;which just happens to have 10 more Hit Points to boot. Bottom Line: You probably won%26rsquo;t build too many of these light tanks once you reach Tech Level 2 unless you%26rsquo;re running low on resources and can%26rsquo;t afford something better. Sherman Cost: $1020 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 300 First used in Operation Torch, the Allied invasion of North Africa in November, 1942, the M4 Sherman was the WWII equivalent of the Chrysler K car: It could be manufactured quickly and easily, was reliable in the field, simple to service, and its chassis served as the basis for thousands of other armored vehicles. Early-model Shermans could be easily %26ldquo;brewed up%26rdquo; by German Panther and Tiger tanks, quickly earning them nicknames like %26ldquo;Tommycookers%26rdquo; and %26ldquo;Ronsons%26rdquo; (after the cigarette lighter guaranteed to light up on the first attempt). In War Front, the Sherman is still inferior to its Russian and German counterparts, but not to that extent. Pros: Its firepower is isn%26rsquo;t top-notch, but it can roll with the punches thrown by enemy tanks. Once the Sherman is available, you%26rsquo;ll probably never click on the Matilda icon again. Cons: None Bottom Line: Could be better%26hellip;but it could be a lot worse. Calliope Sherman Cost: $1562 Army Points: 5 Hit Points: 300 By mounting a rack containing 60 4.5%26rdquo; rockets atop a Sherman, the Allies transformed an infantry support tank into a self-propelled artillery piece, dubbed the %26ldquo;Rocket Launcher T34 Calliope.%26rdquo; The shock effect of this many rockets hitting an enemy location is hard to underestimate, and the Calliope played an important part in the breakthrough in the Po Valley in Italy. Pros: Unlike the standard Sherman, it can lob rockets onto any specified location, be it a spot on the ground or an enemy building. Cons: It might be built on the same chassis as the Sherman, but the Calliope takes a lot more damage from enemy fire. What do you think would happen if an HE round hit that rack of rockets? Bottom Line: One of the coolest-looking units in the game, but you can produce two Priests for less money and get similar results%26mdash;and at the cost of only one more Army Point. Pershing Cost: $1617 Army Points: 6 Hit Points: 450 Officially known as the T26 and called the %26ldquo;Pershing,%26rdquo; this was originally designed as a heavy tank and did not reach the battlefield in Europe until near the end of the fighting, in February 1945. Its much more powerful gun made it clearly superior to even %26ldquo;upgunned%26rdquo; Shermans, and it could go toe-to-toe with the German Tiger I and Panthers it faced. It eventually saw service in the Korean Conflict, where it chalked up admirable kill rates against Russian-made T-34/85s deployed by the North Koreans. Pros: You can%26rsquo;t deploy a heavier hitter than the Pershing, and it looks like even better when you compared it to the price of the Calliope (even if it doesn%26rsquo;t have artillery capability). Cons: Long production time, can only be made at Tech Level 3, and still not a match for the super-tanks wielded by the Russians and Germans. Bottom Line: Dollar for dollar, it%26rsquo;s your best card in the tank game%26mdash;why not play it? Priest Cost: $700 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 200 This American-made self-propelled artillery piece was designated the M7, but the British dubbed because the ring surrounding its .50-caliber machine gun resembled a pulpit (and also because it replaced the %26ldquo;Bishop%26rdquo;). Pros: Unlike tanks, the Priest can be ordered to bombard a specific spot%26mdash;and it doesn%26rsquo;t need to have line of sight to do it. It has the longest range of any Tech Level 1 or 2 vehicle in the Allied arsenal. Cons: Because of its arcing trajectory, the Priest is vulnerable to fast-moving tanks: the target could have already moved by the time the Priest%26rsquo;s shell reaches its destination. Bottom Line: Great for demolishing buildings or raining fire on a particular spot, but it doesn%26rsquo;t deliver quite the %26ldquo;oomph%26rdquo; you%26rsquo;d like when hitting armored vehicles. You%26rsquo;ll want to keep tanks like the Sherman or Pershing around it for protection as it does its work. M40 Cost: $1254 Army Points: 5 Hit Points: 350 Packing a 155mm gun, the M40 self-propelled artillery vehicle actually saw very little action in World War II, but it was used by Allied forces in Korea and was adapted for later use by the British. It was officially known as the %26ldquo;155mm Gun Motor Carriage M40,%26rdquo; which would probably have been shortened to a catchy nickname like %26ldquo;Priest%26rdquo; or %26ldquo;Bishop%26rdquo; if it had seen more action. Pros: Longer range than the Priest, and with nearly double the armor it can take a lot more abuse than the cheaper artillery unit. Cons: Unavailable until you reach Tech Level 3, and it takes twice as long to produce as a Priest. Bottom Line: By the point in a battle where you can build both Priests and M40s, the latter%26rsquo;s battlefield durability and greater firepower give it the edge even considering its greater cost in resources and AP points. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 1 ---*---*---*---Helicopter Cost: $1210 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 220 Although the Germans developed the first truly practical helicopter in 1936 and the aircraft was put to use by several combatant countries in World War II, it role in combat was not fully realized until decades later. In War Front, however, the accelerated development of experimental military equipment means you%26rsquo;ll have access to this unique and multi-faceted warbird. Pros: As the only aircraft that Heroes can enter, helicopters can play a pivotal role at critical points in a battle by delivering them and extra ground troops to a vital location. And while Call-In Paratroop drops can also deliver various types of ground troops, they aren%26rsquo;t able to return fire like the Helicopter can. Cons: It%26rsquo;s much slower than other aircraft and is highly vulnerable to AA fire. Unlike in real life, there are no survivors when these choppers go down%26mdash;bad news if a Hero is on board! Bottom Line: A special-use unit that can prove specially useful in certain situation, provided you keep an eye on it as it wends its way to its destination. P-51 Mustang Cost: $800 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 210 There were faster and more heavily armed interceptors in World War II, but the general consensus is that the P-51 Mustang was the finest fighter plane of the war. The P-51H variant%26rsquo;s top speed was nearly 500 mph; the P-51D had a range of over 1,600 miles with drop tanks; both were equipped with up to six .50-caliber machine guns, and the P-51D was capable of carrying air-to-ground rockets. Pros: Super-fast and nimble, the Mustang can deliver brutal strafing runs against enemy infantry and light vehicles, easily dealing with any enemy interceptor it faces. Cons: Feeble against hard targets like bunkers, armored vehicles, and buildings. Bottom Line: Besides strafing incoming infantry, Mustangs are perfectly suited as escorts for fighter-bombers or bombers, or to lure AA fire away from either of them. P-38 Lightning Cost: $990 Army Points: 4 Hit Points: 350 The first warplane designed by the Lockheed Corporation was a doozy. Although its top speed (360 mph) was not breathtaking, its nose-mounted armaments packed a wallop: four .50-caliber machine guns and a 20mm cannon, augmented by rocket launchers and/or bombs. The Germans called it the %26ldquo;Twin-Tailed Devil%26rdquo;%26mdash;and probably prayed to God every time they saw it descend in a tactical support role to devastate airfields, rail lines, and troop transports. Pros: Like the Mustang in the Interceptor class, neither the Russians or Germans can produce a Fighter-Bomber close to the Lightning. It%26rsquo;s especially deadly once you research the Air-To-Ground Capability: a single Lightning can bring down defensive bunkers and other smaller buildings. Cons: None Bottom Line: Consider the Lightning the most essential tool in your tactical weapons arsenal! Call-In B-17Cost: $1200Tech Level Required: 1 Without a doubt the most famous bomber of World War II, the B-17 was nicknamed the “Flying Fortress” thanks to its multitude of .50-caliber machine-gun turrets (the B-17G had 13 in all). Unfortunately, fortresses were apparently much stronger on terra firma than in the air: without fighter support over German soil, B-17 squadrons suffered appalling casualty rates early in the war. Still, this is the quintessential WWII bomber. Pros: You can gain access to this vital strategic weapon very early in the game, and it can eliminate strongholds that would otherwise block the advance of your ground forces. Cons: Quite susceptible to AA fire. Bottom Line: Cheap enough to chance on a deep run into enemy territory, but best used when you know that AA defenses along its flight path are at a minimum. Call-In Aphrodite BomberCost: $1500Tech Level Required: 2 Normally, the Allies wouldn’t consider this type of weapon, even though it delivers mighty destruction in its wake. But the Germans’ frightening breed of high-tech weapons has called for new tactics, and advances in remote-control technology has turned this into a thoroughly viable—and highly devastating—tactical alternative. Pros: This remote-controlled heavy bomber is laden with explosives…and it’s guaranteed to reach its target regardless of the damage it takes on the way. Cons: You can’t build it until you reach Tech Level 2, but then again good things come to those who wait. Bottom Line: Just another reason why air power is the strong suit of the Allied forces. Call-In Earthquake BombCost: $2500Tech Level Required: 3 Though the B-17 might have earned the most glory in WWII, the Lancaster played a vital role in the Allied victory in the European theater. It was the bomber that carried the “Earthquake Bomb,” also known as the “Grand Slam”—a bomb designed on the principle that explosive energy packs a much great punch released in compressed area (underground) than in open areas (above or at ground level). At 22,000 pounds, the Earthquake Bomb represented a weight nearly three times the maximum bomb load of a Flying Fortress. Pros: The devastation is immense, and the resulting crater slows down vehicles and infantry attempting to traverse it. Cons: Like the B-17, it too is vulnerable to AA fire. Bottom Line: Worth clearing out a path for — but make sure your troops get out of the vicinity before this monster plows into the ground. Call-In Nuclear StrikeCost: $4000Tech Level Required: 3 You probably already know the impact of a tactical nuclear device, and if you don’t you can probably guess: major, mind-blowing devastation. War Front doesn’t depict the effects of a true, hydrogen-based nuclear weapon, but rather what one would expect from an atomic bomb designed for tactical use. Pros: Nothing in the immediate vicinity will survive more than a few seconds; the shock wave will rattle buildings and vehicles outside the blast zone; and the bombed area will emit poisonous radiation for a brief period after the initial detonation. Cons: It costs a pretty penny, but fortunately the bombers that deliver the payload are more adept at dodging or absorbing enemy fires than the B-17s and Lancasters delivering less-powerful weapons. Bottom Line: Use it when you can. ‘Nuff said. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 2 ---*---*---*--- German ForcesStrength: Armored ForcesMotto: “Blood and Iron”Most Appropriate For: Intermediate to Advanced Skill Levels Wehrmacht InfantryCost: $100Army Points: 1Hit Points: 60 While no one questions the bravery, courage or effort of other infantry in World War II, it’s almost universally agreed that the Wehrmacht’s foot soldiers were, man for man, the best-trained and most effective in either theater of war. Pros: Like all infantry in War Front, the Wehrmacht units are cheap, quickly produced, and have the capability to capture both buildings and vehicles. Cons: Almost defenseless against armored units, and essentially useless in bringing down enemy structures. Bottom Line: Their ability to capture buildings and be deployed as paratroopers gives them value even when you’re able to make more advanced infantry or armored units. Wehrmacht PanzerfaustCost: $200Army Points: 1Hit Points: 80 These German infantry wield Panzerfausts, which in real life were cheap, disposable, and preloaded anti-tank weapons not to be confused with Panzerschrecks, a reusable bazooka-style weapon. Pros: Inexpensive option for defending against lightly armored enemy units or taking down enemy buildings. Cons: Only slightly more resilient than Wehrmacht Infantry, and when used in close groups to maximize their firepower they’re highly vulnerable to enemy artillery. Bottom Line: Because they can be dropped as paratroops, these units are excellent for pinpoint attacks behind enemy lines to destroy key installations. They also excel at defending bases from similar attacks by the enemy. Jetpack InfantryCost: $400Army Points: 3Hit Points: 75 Although jetpacks are now considered more a novelty item than anything else, the Germans — ever seeking a technological edge in a war where they were outnumbered and outgunned — actually created a prototype jetpack called the Himmelstürmer. The Himmelstürmer was designed to provide short jumps (up to 60m), mainly to bypass obstacles like minefields, waterways, or defensive fortifications. Pros: Even a small force of Jetpack Infantry can wreak havoc in an enemy base, since they can “jump” to safety — or to a new target — as soon as you see the enemy respond to their presence. They’re also useful on the open battlefield: landing behind large, slow-moving vehicles, they can often inflict great damage or even destroy them before the lumbering enemy can respond. Cons: They move quite slowly on foot, and lack the ability to capture buildings or vehicles. Bottom Line: Maximizing a squad of Jetpack Infantry can be a high-maintenance task—but the rewards can be equally high! ExoskeletonCost: $1050Army Points: 3Hit Points: 300 Like jetpacks, walking war machines were originally the purview of science fiction; unlike jetpacks, they’ve never emerged from that domain — at least not in real life. Pros: Exoskeletons are faster than tanks, eat up few Army Points, and are equipped with both machine guns and rockets, making them one of the most versatile ground units in your arsenal. Cons: Relatively low hit points, especially on a cost-per-dollar basis. Bottom Line:  Their speed and versatility achieve optimal effect when you encircle a major target, preventing several of them from receiving collateral damage from an explosion. They’re also great base defenders. Flammwagen APCCost: $700Army Points: 2Hit Points: 250 German engineers loved to produce specialized variants on existing vehicles, and perhaps no vehicle saw so many iterations as the Sdkfz 251: there were 23 official types, and an unknown number of iterations that weren’t officially classified. The Sdkfz 251/16, or “Flammpanzerwagen,” was a half-track that could carry up 12 soldiers (including the crew) and flamethrowers as well as an MG 34 machine gun. Pros: There’s a reason this costs more than the Panther: it dishes out a lot more damage in a shorter amount of time. Cons: Lightly armored, and it must stop and face the enemy when unleashing its fiery payload — a drawback that exposes it to damage from even weak foes. Bottom Line: Speedy and packing a high-powered punch, the Flammwagen can be rushed to trouble spots in a base-defense role or sent out to eliminate infantry or weaker armored enemies such as the Allied Priest or Russian Katyusha. PantherCost: $530Army Points: 3Hit Points: 210 The Panther, or Panzer V,  was the German response to the Russian T-34, a tank that outgunned and outmaneuvered earlier incarnations of the Panzer line. In the real World War II, it would easily have outclassed the Matilda and T-70, its two enemy equivalents in War Front. Pros: You don’t need to advance to Tech Level 2 to produce it, and it’s the equal of the enemy’s Tech Level 1 tanks. The turreted gun means it doesn’t have to face an enemy in order to fire. Cons: Weak armor doesn’t make up for the speed of this relatively smallish tank. Bottom Line: The Panther in War Front isn’t reflective of its real-life counterpart, so don’t build a lot of them thinking it is. TigerCost: $1000Army Points: 4Hit Points: 390 In the first year it saw action, the Tiger was more noted for mechanical failures than its battlefield prowess. As the war shifted and the Germans went over to the defensive, however, this heavy tank struck fear in the hearts of America, British, and Russian tank crews. Pros: Judged on its costs in terms of resources and Army Points, this is probably the best tank in the German lineup. Cons: The only negatives come when compared to other German tanks: it doesn’t have the firepower and armor of more expensive armored units like the Maus tank or Elephant tank killer. Bottom Line: Can go head-to-head with the Soviet T-34 and outclasses the Allied Sherman. Sonic TankCost: $1500Army Points: 5Hit Points: 250 Although most sonic weapons are aimed at inducing aural pain to incapacitate individual soldiers, a huge sonic blast could — in theory — cause vibrations that would shatter buildings and vehicles. Pros: Get these tanks close enough to a target, and the devastation is massive and fast. The turreted weapon allows the Sonic tank to circle targets while delivering damage. Cons: Getting them there. Sonic tanks have amazingly light armor for a unit carrying this price tag, and it’s awfully disappointing to see them so easily crushed by artillery or even anti-tank infantry. Bottom Line: Great for assaults on enemy bases, provided they’re fronted by heavily armored tanks. MausCost: $1510Army Points: 6Hit Points: 500 The heaviest tank to be developed into a working prototype during World War II, the Maus wielded a mighty 128mm cannon and a 75mm coaxial gun and sported steel armor that was 240mm thick in some places. If it had been used in the war, its weight would have been too great for many bridges. The Germans planned for it to ford rivers or, if they were too deep, to submerge and cross on the bottom, using snorkels for air and cables attached to another Maus for electrical power. Pros: Super-heavy armor gives it staying power, and that big cannon gives it major killing power. You can’t ask for more in a tank. Cons: Slower than the Tiger, so it’s not well-suited for fast-moving operations; it also takes longer to produce Bottom Line: This is the tank to build if you have the resources, time, and are planning a straightforward assault. ElephantCost: $1520Army Points: 6Hit Points: 450 A major component of WWII tank-warfare doctrine was that certain vehicles were designated as “tank killers” — essentially self-propelled anti-tank gun platforms. This was the role of the Elephant (“Elefant” in German). It was initially called the “Ferdinand” after its designer, Ferdinand Porsche, but after some design changes it was officially called the Elephant on Hitler’s orders. (Note: A strict vegetarian, Hitler often remarked to acquaintances that the elephant was the strongest of all land animals, yet ate no meat.) Pros: Delivers a mighty wallop against even the largest enemy tanks, and is well-armored. Cons: Like nearly all anti-tank vehicles in World War II, the Elephant lacks a turret and must directly face its opponent when attacking. Not surprisingly, it’s also slow. Bottom Line: Pair it up with the Maus, Hummel, and some AA vehicles to create a powerful and well-rounded armored battalion. WurfrahmenCost: $750Army Points: 2Hit Points: 260 The chassis of the Sdkfz 251 is again put to good use, this time as a mobile rocket launcher. The Wurfrahmen 40 featured side-mounted rocket launchers, while the Wurfrahmen auf Infanterieschlepper sported a rear-mounted frame for launching rockets and resembles the unit seen in War Front.. Pros: Cheap, long-range artillery unit that can be ordered to bombard any spot on the battlefield. A great choice for mobile base defense because it doesn’t drain valuable power supplies. Cons: A bit thin in terms of armor, and because it is artillery its projectiles take a while to reach the target. Bottom Line: An excellent value in terms of resources and production time. You’ll probably be using this even when the Hummel is available. HummelCost: $1225Army Points: 5Hit Points: 350 The fast pace of blitzkrieg combat necessitated the need for self-propelled artillery, and thus was born the Hummel. It offered the firepower of traditional artillery, but could also move fast enough to keep up with Panzer forces that were spearheading breakthroughs in enemy lines. Pros: A true champion when it comes to reducing enemy buildings to rubble. Cons: Neither its ammunition or its howitzer are suited for combat against moving vehicles. Bottom Line: Although it can absorb more damage than the Wurfrahmen, the Hummel still needs the protection of other armored units (or significant numbers of ground troops). WirbelwindCost: $600Army Points: 2Hit Points: 210 Built using the Panzer IV chassis, the Wirbelwind was equipped with four rapid-firing AA guns. Although relatively few Wirbelwinds were produced during the war, they were known to be used against Allied infantry — an ability that is not reproduced in War Front. Pros: Highly economical anti-air defense option that doesn’t drain power supplies. Cons: Unlike AA Bunkers, they’re vulnerable even to enemy infantry, and they count toward your Army limit. Bottom Line: A quick, easy solution for anti-aircraft defense at your base early in the game, and almost an essential for any mobile armored force. RheintochterCost: $1260Army Points: 3Hit Points: 150 German arms designers and manufacturers were known for ideas ahead of their time, and the Rheintochter is one of them. Although it never was deployed during the war, the Rheintochter was a much more simple version (it relied on human control for flight and detonation) of the surface-to-air missiles developed in the 1950s and 1960s. Pros: It’s a “one shot, one kill” device: it never misses, and the target always goes down. Cons: Long reload time and weak armor. Bottom Line: Mix them in with Wirbelwinds for a mobile, powerful AA system. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 3 ---*---*---*--- Me 262Cost: $930Army Points: 3Hit Points: 200 If not for Adolf Hitler’s insistence that the Me 262 be developed as a bomber, it might have entered the war much sooner — and that could have had a major impact on the outcome of the air war over Germany. Instead, the first operational jet fighter didn’t see action until August, 1944, and by then the massive number of Allied bombers meant it had to focus on them rather on dogfighting. Pros: A speedy interceptor that matches up well against enemy fighters, and it can put a major hurt on bombers. Cons: Fairly expensive, and its ground-support role is limited to attacking infantry and light armor. Bottom Line: Despite its limitations, you should always have a few of these at your disposal to protect your Stukas from Mustangs and Yak-9s. StukaCost: $1100Army Points: 4Hit Points: 300 For thousands of Allied soldiers, the Stuka’s trademark siren meant it was time to take cover. But the German dive bomber earned its deadly reputation early in the war, when the Luftwaffe had unchallenged air superiority. When improved Allied fighters arrived, the Stuka’s slow speed and sluggish maneuverability led to extremely high loss rates in the last two to three years of the war. Pros: An adequate ground-attack aircraft, especially adept at hitting moving targets. Cons: Like the Me 262, it’s fairly expensive for its class; unlike the Allied P-38 Lightning, there’s no way to upgrade its bomb-only capability. Bottom Line: Just as in real life, the Stuka is not up to par with the ground-support airplanes of the Allies or Russia. Giant ZeppelinCost: $5000Army Points: 5Hit Points: 1000 In the first few years of World War I, Zeppelins were able to drop their bombs almost at will over English soil, but the arrival of faster fighters and incendiary ammo rendered the Zeppelins obsolete. The Giant Zeppelin in War Front is a rigid airship with high-powered cannons and strong armor to protect against fire from AA guns and enemy fighters. Pros: The cannons mounted on the Giant Zeppelin can easily take out super-heavy tanks fielded by the Allies and Russians, and is invaluable in reducing major buildings. Cons: This lumbering craft has a high number of hit points, but unfortunately they bleed away rather quickly when enemy AA guns train their sights on the big target. Bottom Line: Perfect as a heavily armed “guardian angel” traveling above an armored formation that’s equipped with AA vehicles to protect it from enemy fighters. Call-In Junkers BomberCost: $1200Tech Level Required: 1 Though perhaps most famed for the Ju 87 Stuka, Junkers manufactured a slew of aircraft for Germany, particularly in the bomber and transport classes. The six-engine bomber depicted in War Front resembles the Ju 390, a prototype with a range of over 6,000 miles. Pros: Can be built at Tech Level 1, and it delivers damage to a fairly wide area. Cons: Interceptors can provide protection from enemy fighters, but the slow Junkers can be brought down rather quickly by ground-based AA fire. Bottom Line: Always send along Me 262s to not only protect against enemy fighters, but also draw away AA fire from this large plane. Call-In Horten BomberCost: $2000Tech Level Required: 2 The Luftwaffe always seemed to have great designs in the works, but the vast majority never made it into production. Such was the case with the Horten 229, a jet-powered “flying wing” bomber that was the forerunner of today’s B-2 Stealth bomber. Pros: The extra money you spend for the Horten rather than the Junkers is worth it: this bomber can take much more damage than the Junkers and still deliver the goods. Cons: Despite the extra armor, the Horten can still be brought down by fire from AA guns and interceptors; you must reach Tech Level 2 before you can call in the Horten. Bottom Line: Unless you’re strapped for resources, you should always opt for the Horten over the Junkers. V1/V2Cost: V1 Launch Pad $3000, $4000 to upgrade to V2Tech Level Required: 2 for V1, 3 for V2 upgrade The V1 and V2 are generally considered the world’s first guided missile and first ballistic missile, respectively. Although their accuracy was poor, their ability to strike without warning (or very little warning, in the case of the V-1) gave the Allies incentive to seek out and destroy their launch sites, diverting forces that would otherwise be used in the move into Germany. Pros: Neither the V1 or V2 can be brought down by AA fire. Cons: A V2 launch not only carries considerable resources costs, but also the time spent reaching Tech Level 3. And while the V1 is more accurate than the V2, there’s no guarantee that either will hit the precise point you target. Bottom Line: A V1 or V2 blast can flatten a large area and deflate an opponent’s morale. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 4 ---*---*---*--- Russian ForcesStrength: InfantryMotto: “Power In Unity”Most Appropriate For: Intermediate and Advanced Skill Levels Red Army InfantryCost: $100Army Points: 1Hit Points: 60 How many men could the Soviets deploy into battle? Consider this: by December 1, 1941, the Russians suffered between four and five million casualties — but after all that they managed to have 280 rifle and cavalry divisions and 44 tank or mechanized brigades in the field for a counterattack. About 500,000 men a month were drafted into the war until its end. Pros: There’s nothing that elevates these troopers over the Allied and German soldiers, but they’re produced slightly more quickly — and when you’re producing a lot, “slightly” matters. Cons: The same as with any infantry unit: they’re fodder for armored units and practically useless against buildings. Bottom Line: Red Army Infantry can prove useful throughout a battle because they can capture buildings and vehicles, and they are the only ground troops available for paratroop drops. Molotov InfantryCost: $150Army Points: 1Hit Points: 70 Ironically, Molotov Cocktails were first used by the forces of Francisco Franco’s forces in the Spanish Civil War—forces supported by Nazi Germany. Their next major role came in the Russo-Finnish war when they were used not by the Russians, but by the Finns: they sarcastically nicknamed the homemade petrol bombs “Molotov Cocktails” because Soviet politician Vyacheslav Molotov claimed the Russian planes dropping bombs were really dispensing food. Pros: They cost 50% more than Red Army infantry units, but do considerably more damage against any type of vehicle or building they attack. Cons: None. Bottom Line: Consider these lowly soldiers an integral part of your strategy — even one can do significant damage before being killed. Red Army MedicCost: $250Army Points: 2Hit Points: 50 The Soviets immediately termed the war against the German invaders as a “Great Patriotic War,” and despite years of oppression and brutality the vast majority of the Russian people chose their Motherland over collusion with the Nazis—not knowing the Nazis would have killed them regardless. Huge numbers of volunteers, many of them women, tended the Soviet wounded, and fighting such a brutal war on their own soil provided the Red Army troops a bit of reassurance their Nazi counterparts could never hope for. Pros: Medic units automatically heal wounded units in their vicinity, which means they survive and advance in experience level—making them even more deadly to the enemy. Cons: They’re doctors, not soldiers, damn it—which is a Star Trek way of saying they have no offensive capabilities whatsoever. You also have to reach Tech Level 2 to train them. Bottom Line: Expensive for infantry units, but you should definitely produce several to accompany soldiers you send into battle. KomissarCost: $210Army Points: 1Hit Points: 75 Although some Soviet apologists will argue the specifics, the fact remains: komissars were often positioned near the front line to ensure Soviet troops didn’t desert. Their deterrent? An execution on the spot. In one recorded incident, a divisional commander at Stalingrad gathered his men, gave a speech on the need for courage—then walked down the front line of the formation and shot every tenth man in the head. Now that’s motivation! Pros: His pistol deals a great deal of damage, and boosts the rate of fire of troops around him. Cons: Slightly expensive. Bottom Line: The Soviet army kept them with their troops, and look at the results. Do the same. PartisansCost: $1500 ($300 per Partisan)Army Points: 5Hit Points: 50 [Note: Partisans are not produced at installations, but we include them here because they are infantry units.] The Nazis assumed the Soviet people would rise in revolt against a regime that brutally oppressed them. That assumption would have been correct if the Nazis hadn’t brutalized the Russians on an even more barbaric scale, and the role partisans played in the defeat of the German invaders can hardly be understated. Pros: Partisans can appear anywhere on the map...even in places where the “fog of war” is still in place and you have no intelligence about what’s there. Cons: You can’t produce them one at a time, so if you’re short of resources you might have to wait for the opportunity to insert these guerilla warriors behind enemy lines. Bottom Line: Consider yourself lucky: the Allies and Germans have nothing that matches the stealth ability of these freedom fighters! Vodka DealerCost: $330Army Points: 2Hit Points: 50 First things first: there were no “vodka dealers” per se in the Soviet Army. But Red Army soldiers did have a penchant for the clear liquor, and as anyone who’s imbibed more than a moderate amount knows, it does give you a feeling of invincibility. Pros: Doesn’t get much better than this: any infantry unit in the Vodka Dealer’s radius cannot be killed. Cons: Relatively low hit points…perhaps he should drink some of his own stock! Bottom Line: Like the Medic and Komissar, consider the Vodka Dealer an essential part of any infantry squad you send into battle. ZIS 42Cost: $720Army Points: 2Hit Points: 150 The Zis 42 was a half-track vehicle typically used in a cargo-transportation role in World War II. Pros: Highly effective against infantry, and its troop-carrying capacity (12) gives it added value. Cons: Very light armor, especially compared to enemy APCs. Bottom Line: There are probably better units you can spend resources on than this one. APC MoleCost: $1350Army Points: 3Hit Points: 250 The term “mole” usually applies to a spy, but in this case the term is literal: the APC mole burrows underground and digs a tunnel to the target destination. Needless to say, this technology did not exist in World War II—or if it did, someone really dropped the ball on using it. Pros: Carries up to 10 troops and can pop up anywhere on the map. Cons: The vehicle itself is defenseless. Bottom Line: Coordinate an attack with an APC Mole filled with Molotov Infantry, Komissars, and Vodka dealers along with Partisans, and you’ve caused a major headache for the enemy. T-70Cost: $360Army Points: 3Hit Points: 180 If the Sherman was the K car of World War II tanks, the T-70 was the Mini-Cooper: fast but undergunned, it still served a role in the Soviet war effort because it was easy to produce. The success of the T-34—and the way that tank warfare evolved to encompass many more tank-on-tank battles—spelled the demise of this little spitfire. Pros: Cheap, cheap, cheap. Cons: You get what you pay for: the T-70 has the lowest hit points of any Tech Level 1 Tank. Bottom Line: You might need to build some, but don’t get carried away and build too many just because you haven’t hit Tech Level 2 yet. T-34Cost: $760Army Points: 4Hit Points: 270 When the Germans invaded the Soviet Union in 1941, the last thing they expected was a tank that not only matched their finest armored beast, but also surpassed it in every way. Some German tanks at the end of the war might have outgunned the T-34, but for the bulk of the conflict it was the standard by which all medium tanks were judged. Pros: An inexpensive tank that can square off with anything the enemy forces can throw at it. Cons: The cheap resource price comes at the expense of one extra Army Point over enemy equivalents. It doesn’t sound like much, but it can add up if you’re cranking them out for a big armored assault. Bottom Line: At this price, you can afford to make them and say to hell with the extra Army Point. Ice SpitterCost: $960Army Points: 4Hit Points: 250 We are all familiar with “dry ice,” a substance cold enough to cause frostbite on contact with skin. Given the incentive to create new superweapons that could turn the tide of war—coupled with the Russian weather—would it be surprising to see a weapon that pushes dry ice from the realm of commercial use into the role of an offensive weapon? Pros: When an Ice Spitter attacks, everyone stops to take notice—because they can’t move even if they wanted to. Works on buildings as well as vehicles. Cons: Aside from freezing objects in place, the Ice Spitter does no damage. Bottom Line: Use it in conjunction with even weak units like the T-70 tank, the Zis 42, or Molotov Infantry: once an object is frozen, it tends to break up easily when hot lead hits it! IS-3 StalinCost: $1152Army Points: 6Hit Points: 400 When the Soviets saw the new Panther and Tiger tanks deployed by the Germans at the Battle of Kursk in 1943, they knew they needed something with greater firepower and more armor than the T-34. This eventually led to the development of the “Iosif Stalin tank,” or IS series. The IS-2 saw action in World War II, while the IS-3—with its trademark rounded turret and angled front hull—was first shown to western observers at the Allied Victory Parade in Berlin in September, 1945. Pros:  Much heavier armor gives the IS 3 greater survivability than the Tiger, and its gun deals out a lot more damage. Cons: Slower than the T-34, and you must upgrade your War Factories to produce them. Bottom Line: An essential unit once the enemy is able to produce heavy tanks. Kharkov RampagerCost: $1600Army Points: 7Hit Points: 1800 As the German situation grew more desperate and the Nazis were constantly on the defensive, they turned to ever-larger vehicles wielding massive guns and sporting amazingly thick armor in the hopes they could stand up to the Russian onslaught. The Kharkov Rampager is a hypothetical response to German prototypes like the Maus: its stupendously thick armor means it can absorb incredible amounts of punishment and still continue to knock out enemy tanks and artillery. Pros: The armor is so thick, you can pretty much send this behemoth straight into enemy fire and know it will take down more than its share of enemies before it’s destroyed. Use the Rampage skill to increase its killing capacity even more (best utilized when the tank is dug in). Cons: Slow movement and turning means more nimble units can get in many hits before the Rampager is able to respond. Bottom Line: German and Allied commanders will curse when they see this giant lumbering toward their forces. ZSU-37Cost: $480Army Points: 2Hit Points: 190 Talk about a second-hand design: the Zsu 37 was built using the SU-76 chassis, which in turn was built using a lengthened T-70 chassis. Developed late in the war, when German air superiority had flagged. Pros: Like many Soviet units, it’s cheaper than its Allied and German cousins, and it performs better than the Bofors. Cons: Thin armor makes it more vulnerable to enemy fire. Bottom Line: An inexpensive, quick way to provide stopgap AA defense at a base, and a crucial part of any armored battalion. KatyushaCost: $640Army Points: 3Hit Points: 150 Perhaps no images are more associated with Soviet firepower in World War II than footage of rockets screaming from Katyusha launchers. The Germans nicknamed them the Katyusha the “Stalin Organ,” and the rocket-launcher assembly itself could be mounted on almost anything: tractors, flatbed trucks, and even gunboats. Pros: The Katyusha is quickly produced and boasts an amazingly long range, allowing you to drop fire on distant enemy vehicles and fortifications. It also has a surprisingly fast rate of fire. Cons: Flatbed trucks are great for hauling stuff, but they don’t hold up too well when fired upon: it only takes one or two hits from a tank or several Bazookas/Panzerfausts to finish them off. Bottom Line: It’s difficult to imagine this much firepower for such a low cost. You’ll still be producing this Tech Level 1 unit at the end of even very long battles. Moving Giant TurretCost: $1600Army Points: 6Hit Points: 1300 There is quite possibly nothing as unnerving to an enemy as a long-range artillery attack. One moment, troops and tanks are moving into position; the next they lay broken and shattered, crushed without warning. Pros: The range of the Moving Giant Turret is simply mind-boggling, which means it can take your opponent quite a while just to figure out where the barrage is originating from—and then he has to figure out how to get units there to stop it. Cons: This long-range deathbringer moves even more slowly than the Kharkov Rampager, and it must stop in order to fire. Particularly vulnerable to anti-tank infantry or light, speedy vehicles like the Flammwagen or Halftrack. Bottom Line: As a Soviet commander, you have no better tool than this for bringing down important enemy structures. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 5 ---*---*---*--- YakovlevCost: $900Army Points: 3Hit Points: 180 There were several variations of this single-engine fighter produced over the course of the war: in War Front, you’ll be deploying the famous Yak-9. Even though German bombing raids hampered production, the plane proved to be highly successful. Pros: Can escort Sturmoviks on bombing raids to protect them from enemy fighters, as well as lure AA guns into not firing on vulnerable Tupolev or Winter’s Breath Call-In Bombers. Cons: Weak armor means even fire from enemy interceptors is enough to bring these nimble planes crashing to the ground. Bottom Line: One reason you should focus on ground forces in your quest for victory. SturmovikCost: $1100Army Points: 4Hit Points: 280 Just like the Russian people, Soviet industry answered the call to battle when the Germans invaded. One of its most impressive feats was the Ilyushin Sturmovik: between the Il-2 and Il-10, over 36,000 were built. The Il-2 is the model featured in War Front. Pros: Can provide quick strikes to enemy fortifications and installations, as well as serve in a ground-attack role against slow-moving enemy armor or infantry formations. Cons: Like the Yakovlev, the Sturmovik’s armor is weak in comparison to enemy fighter-bombers. Bottom Line: Keep some of these available at all times, but building too many is a waste of Army Points better spent on infantry or armored units. Call-In Tupolev BomberCost: $1200Tech Level Required: 1 The Tupolev TB-3 was a four-engine heavy bomber used by the Soviet Air Force in the 1930s and 1940s. Of course, any plane that was in service in the 1930s stood little chance of success by the middle of the war, and after 1942 the Russians pulled them from duty after 1942. Interestingly, the Soviets considered using the TB-3 as a way to airlift small tanks into battle zones. Pros: An inexpensive way to lay waste to a large area of enemy territory. Cons: Slow and unmaneuverable, the TB-3 is especially vulnerable to AA fire. Bottom Line: Make sure you’ve cleared out any sources of AA fire, and try to have some Yakovlevs in the target area to deal with any enemy interceptors that might shoot down this antiquated bomber. Call-In Winters BreathCost: $2500Tech Level Required: 3 With the Ice Spitter technology perfected, the Soviets decided to extend its icy welcome through the use of air delivery. Pros: Its payload instantly freezes everything in an extremely large radius: even buildings are unable to produce units until the ice has melted. Cons: The TB-3 is the bomb platform the Soviets have chosen for the TB-3, so the same disadvantages apply. You also need to reach Tech Level 3 before you can access this weapon. Bottom Line: Don’t waste the resources on this unless you are ready to move in with other units capable of shattering the frozen enemy buildings and vehicles. Call-In Artillery StrikeCost: $2000Tech Level Required: 3 The Call-In Artillery Strike is even more nerve-shattering to your enemies than the devastation of the Moving Giant Turret because there’s nothing they can do stop it (aside from capturing your Radio Station, that is). Pros: The area of destruction is large, and the damage is significant. Cons: Not as accurate as a bombing strike or shelling by the Moving Giant Turret, and the reload time is rather long. Bottom Line: Just imagining your enemies tearing their hair out because there’s nothing they can do to stop this explosive downpour is reason in and of itself to give the order to open fire! Now that you’re an encyclopedia of death, get more tips and tactics, as well as full walkthroughs of the Allied and German campaigns in the rest of our guide.

There were faster and more heavily armed interceptors in World War II, but the general consensus is that the P-51 Mustang was the finest fighter plane of the war. The P-51H variant’s top speed was nearly 500 mph; the P-51D had a range of over 1,600 miles with drop tanks; both were equipped with up to six .50-caliber machine guns, and the P-51D was capable of carrying air-to-ground rockets.

Pros: Super-fast and nimble, the Mustang can deliver brutal strafing runs against enemy infantry and light vehicles, easily dealing with any enemy interceptor it faces.

Cons: Feeble against hard targets like bunkers, armored vehicles, and buildings.

Bottom Line: Besides strafing incoming infantry, Mustangs are perfectly suited as escorts for fighter-bombers or bombers, or to lure AA fire away from either of them.

P-38 Lightning
Cost: $990
Army Points: 4
Hit Points: 350

Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the units you deploy into the various battle zones is a key component of success. Here%26rsquo;s a look at the offensive units you%26rsquo;ll be able to deploy when controlling the Allied, German, and Russian forces, and how they stack up in terms of cost and effectiveness. And while War Front is based on an alternate history, many of the units in the game either saw combat or were on the verge of entering the fight when the war ended. With that in mind, we%26rsquo;ve included a little historical background on many of them to give you a better idea of the fighting machines that dueled in the greatest conflict humanity has ever known. Also check out the other sections of our guide, including general tips and strategies, and complete Allied and German mission walkthroughs. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 0 ---*---*---*--- Allied Forces Strength: Air Power Motto: %26ldquo;Death From Above%26rdquo; Most Appropriate For: Novice to Intermediate Skill Levels MG Infantry Cost: $100 Army Points: 1 Hit Points: 60 The basic foot soldier of the Allied forces can be produced cheaply and fairly quickly. MG Infantry are effective against enemy infantry and light vehicles. Pros: With the %26ldquo;Capture Buildings%26rdquo; ability upgrade, you can use MG Infantry to seize both buildings and vehicles. Cons: Highly vulnerable to any type of weapon-bearing vehicle, and it%26rsquo;s a good thing they can capture buildings: Their lack of firepower means it takes them quite a while to bring down any enemy structures. Bottom Line: One of the few Tech Level 1 units you%26rsquo;ll still be producing at the end of the game because of its Capture Buildings skill. Bazooka Trooper Cost: $185 Army Points: Hit Points: 80 The firepower wielded by Bazooka Troopers allows them to take out both installations and lightly armored enemy vehicles. Pros: They can be produced and deployed rapidly, and when several are combined for a massed assault they can quickly destroy tanks or demolish buildings. Cons: The advantages of a massed attack are offset by their vulnerability to artillery and tank fire when they%26rsquo;re packed into a tight group. Bottom Line: Decent preliminary defense against light armor. Probably most effective when dropped behind enemy lines to destroy unprotected buildings. Ranger Cost: $300 Army Points: 2 Hit Points: 75 Rangers are the Allied army%26rsquo;s elite foot soldiers, equal to any enemy troops they might face. Pros: They either kill or heavily wound enemies with a single shot, have a much longer firing range than other U.S. infantry, and their High Explosives ability allows them to destroy buildings with satchel charges. Cons: Considerably more expensive than MG Infantry or Bazooka Troopers, and they%26rsquo;re susceptible to enemy fire when placing bombs at a target. Bottom Line: If a building lacks enough protection to prevent a Ranger from planting High Explosives, you could probably use cheaper MF Infantry to capture it. But their long range makes them ideal for protecting a base against enemies attempting sneak attacks to destroy or capture your buildings. Halftrack Cost: $800 Army Points: 2 Hit Points: 210 This speedy truck serves double-duty: It can carry up to 12 soldiers, and wields a machine gun that can take out infantry and light armor. Pros: Cheap and rapidly produced, the Halftrack%26rsquo;s speed and high rate of machine-gun fire makes it a good choice for patrol duty or to eliminate lightly armored mobile artillery units like the Katyusha or Wurfrahmen. Cons: Its speed comes at a price: just a couple of hits from even the lightest enemy tanks will cost you the vehicle. Bottom Line: Excellent for rushing to trouble spots, especially if the threat is infantry or AA vehicles %26mdash; but watch out if it faces anything firing explosive shells. Bofors Cost: $600 Army Points: 2 Hit Points: 200 Bofors was one of the first names in anti-aircraft weaponry%26mdash;so much so that AA guns in general were called Bofors even when they were produced by another manufacturer. Used by both sides during World War II. Pros: The fastest, cheapest way to gain protection against enemy aircraft either at a base or as part of a mobile force. Can also target paratroopers as they descend toward the gun. Cons: Unlike AA guns, they count toward your army limit, and on their own they%26rsquo;re defenseless against any enemy ground forces. Bottom Line: Not quite as effective as its Russian and German counterparts, but it%26rsquo;s still the unit of choice for guarding armor and infantry from airborne attacks as they advance on targets. Matilda Cost: $500 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 200 The main tank of the British army at the outbreak of World War II came in several variations, with the Matilda II playing a key role in the North African campaign. As newer German tanks were produced, however, the Matilda proved much less of a threat, and it was phased out of service by 1943. Pros: Luckily, this Matilda is considerably speedier than its real-life counterpart, and it packs more single-shot firepower than the Halftrack. Cons: It can hold its own against other nations%26rsquo; light tanks, but that%26rsquo;s about it. And its low rate of fire makes it less effective against infantry than the Halftrack%26mdash;which just happens to have 10 more Hit Points to boot. Bottom Line: You probably won%26rsquo;t build too many of these light tanks once you reach Tech Level 2 unless you%26rsquo;re running low on resources and can%26rsquo;t afford something better. Sherman Cost: $1020 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 300 First used in Operation Torch, the Allied invasion of North Africa in November, 1942, the M4 Sherman was the WWII equivalent of the Chrysler K car: It could be manufactured quickly and easily, was reliable in the field, simple to service, and its chassis served as the basis for thousands of other armored vehicles. Early-model Shermans could be easily %26ldquo;brewed up%26rdquo; by German Panther and Tiger tanks, quickly earning them nicknames like %26ldquo;Tommycookers%26rdquo; and %26ldquo;Ronsons%26rdquo; (after the cigarette lighter guaranteed to light up on the first attempt). In War Front, the Sherman is still inferior to its Russian and German counterparts, but not to that extent. Pros: Its firepower is isn%26rsquo;t top-notch, but it can roll with the punches thrown by enemy tanks. Once the Sherman is available, you%26rsquo;ll probably never click on the Matilda icon again. Cons: None Bottom Line: Could be better%26hellip;but it could be a lot worse. Calliope Sherman Cost: $1562 Army Points: 5 Hit Points: 300 By mounting a rack containing 60 4.5%26rdquo; rockets atop a Sherman, the Allies transformed an infantry support tank into a self-propelled artillery piece, dubbed the %26ldquo;Rocket Launcher T34 Calliope.%26rdquo; The shock effect of this many rockets hitting an enemy location is hard to underestimate, and the Calliope played an important part in the breakthrough in the Po Valley in Italy. Pros: Unlike the standard Sherman, it can lob rockets onto any specified location, be it a spot on the ground or an enemy building. Cons: It might be built on the same chassis as the Sherman, but the Calliope takes a lot more damage from enemy fire. What do you think would happen if an HE round hit that rack of rockets? Bottom Line: One of the coolest-looking units in the game, but you can produce two Priests for less money and get similar results%26mdash;and at the cost of only one more Army Point. Pershing Cost: $1617 Army Points: 6 Hit Points: 450 Officially known as the T26 and called the %26ldquo;Pershing,%26rdquo; this was originally designed as a heavy tank and did not reach the battlefield in Europe until near the end of the fighting, in February 1945. Its much more powerful gun made it clearly superior to even %26ldquo;upgunned%26rdquo; Shermans, and it could go toe-to-toe with the German Tiger I and Panthers it faced. It eventually saw service in the Korean Conflict, where it chalked up admirable kill rates against Russian-made T-34/85s deployed by the North Koreans. Pros: You can%26rsquo;t deploy a heavier hitter than the Pershing, and it looks like even better when you compared it to the price of the Calliope (even if it doesn%26rsquo;t have artillery capability). Cons: Long production time, can only be made at Tech Level 3, and still not a match for the super-tanks wielded by the Russians and Germans. Bottom Line: Dollar for dollar, it%26rsquo;s your best card in the tank game%26mdash;why not play it? Priest Cost: $700 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 200 This American-made self-propelled artillery piece was designated the M7, but the British dubbed because the ring surrounding its .50-caliber machine gun resembled a pulpit (and also because it replaced the %26ldquo;Bishop%26rdquo;). Pros: Unlike tanks, the Priest can be ordered to bombard a specific spot%26mdash;and it doesn%26rsquo;t need to have line of sight to do it. It has the longest range of any Tech Level 1 or 2 vehicle in the Allied arsenal. Cons: Because of its arcing trajectory, the Priest is vulnerable to fast-moving tanks: the target could have already moved by the time the Priest%26rsquo;s shell reaches its destination. Bottom Line: Great for demolishing buildings or raining fire on a particular spot, but it doesn%26rsquo;t deliver quite the %26ldquo;oomph%26rdquo; you%26rsquo;d like when hitting armored vehicles. You%26rsquo;ll want to keep tanks like the Sherman or Pershing around it for protection as it does its work. M40 Cost: $1254 Army Points: 5 Hit Points: 350 Packing a 155mm gun, the M40 self-propelled artillery vehicle actually saw very little action in World War II, but it was used by Allied forces in Korea and was adapted for later use by the British. It was officially known as the %26ldquo;155mm Gun Motor Carriage M40,%26rdquo; which would probably have been shortened to a catchy nickname like %26ldquo;Priest%26rdquo; or %26ldquo;Bishop%26rdquo; if it had seen more action. Pros: Longer range than the Priest, and with nearly double the armor it can take a lot more abuse than the cheaper artillery unit. Cons: Unavailable until you reach Tech Level 3, and it takes twice as long to produce as a Priest. Bottom Line: By the point in a battle where you can build both Priests and M40s, the latter%26rsquo;s battlefield durability and greater firepower give it the edge even considering its greater cost in resources and AP points. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 1 ---*---*---*---Helicopter Cost: $1210 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 220 Although the Germans developed the first truly practical helicopter in 1936 and the aircraft was put to use by several combatant countries in World War II, it role in combat was not fully realized until decades later. In War Front, however, the accelerated development of experimental military equipment means you%26rsquo;ll have access to this unique and multi-faceted warbird. Pros: As the only aircraft that Heroes can enter, helicopters can play a pivotal role at critical points in a battle by delivering them and extra ground troops to a vital location. And while Call-In Paratroop drops can also deliver various types of ground troops, they aren%26rsquo;t able to return fire like the Helicopter can. Cons: It%26rsquo;s much slower than other aircraft and is highly vulnerable to AA fire. Unlike in real life, there are no survivors when these choppers go down%26mdash;bad news if a Hero is on board! Bottom Line: A special-use unit that can prove specially useful in certain situation, provided you keep an eye on it as it wends its way to its destination. P-51 Mustang Cost: $800 Army Points: 3 Hit Points: 210 There were faster and more heavily armed interceptors in World War II, but the general consensus is that the P-51 Mustang was the finest fighter plane of the war. The P-51H variant%26rsquo;s top speed was nearly 500 mph; the P-51D had a range of over 1,600 miles with drop tanks; both were equipped with up to six .50-caliber machine guns, and the P-51D was capable of carrying air-to-ground rockets. Pros: Super-fast and nimble, the Mustang can deliver brutal strafing runs against enemy infantry and light vehicles, easily dealing with any enemy interceptor it faces. Cons: Feeble against hard targets like bunkers, armored vehicles, and buildings. Bottom Line: Besides strafing incoming infantry, Mustangs are perfectly suited as escorts for fighter-bombers or bombers, or to lure AA fire away from either of them. P-38 Lightning Cost: $990 Army Points: 4 Hit Points: 350 The first warplane designed by the Lockheed Corporation was a doozy. Although its top speed (360 mph) was not breathtaking, its nose-mounted armaments packed a wallop: four .50-caliber machine guns and a 20mm cannon, augmented by rocket launchers and/or bombs. The Germans called it the %26ldquo;Twin-Tailed Devil%26rdquo;%26mdash;and probably prayed to God every time they saw it descend in a tactical support role to devastate airfields, rail lines, and troop transports. Pros: Like the Mustang in the Interceptor class, neither the Russians or Germans can produce a Fighter-Bomber close to the Lightning. It%26rsquo;s especially deadly once you research the Air-To-Ground Capability: a single Lightning can bring down defensive bunkers and other smaller buildings. Cons: None Bottom Line: Consider the Lightning the most essential tool in your tactical weapons arsenal! Call-In B-17Cost: $1200Tech Level Required: 1 Without a doubt the most famous bomber of World War II, the B-17 was nicknamed the “Flying Fortress” thanks to its multitude of .50-caliber machine-gun turrets (the B-17G had 13 in all). Unfortunately, fortresses were apparently much stronger on terra firma than in the air: without fighter support over German soil, B-17 squadrons suffered appalling casualty rates early in the war. Still, this is the quintessential WWII bomber. Pros: You can gain access to this vital strategic weapon very early in the game, and it can eliminate strongholds that would otherwise block the advance of your ground forces. Cons: Quite susceptible to AA fire. Bottom Line: Cheap enough to chance on a deep run into enemy territory, but best used when you know that AA defenses along its flight path are at a minimum. Call-In Aphrodite BomberCost: $1500Tech Level Required: 2 Normally, the Allies wouldn’t consider this type of weapon, even though it delivers mighty destruction in its wake. But the Germans’ frightening breed of high-tech weapons has called for new tactics, and advances in remote-control technology has turned this into a thoroughly viable—and highly devastating—tactical alternative. Pros: This remote-controlled heavy bomber is laden with explosives…and it’s guaranteed to reach its target regardless of the damage it takes on the way. Cons: You can’t build it until you reach Tech Level 2, but then again good things come to those who wait. Bottom Line: Just another reason why air power is the strong suit of the Allied forces. Call-In Earthquake BombCost: $2500Tech Level Required: 3 Though the B-17 might have earned the most glory in WWII, the Lancaster played a vital role in the Allied victory in the European theater. It was the bomber that carried the “Earthquake Bomb,” also known as the “Grand Slam”—a bomb designed on the principle that explosive energy packs a much great punch released in compressed area (underground) than in open areas (above or at ground level). At 22,000 pounds, the Earthquake Bomb represented a weight nearly three times the maximum bomb load of a Flying Fortress. Pros: The devastation is immense, and the resulting crater slows down vehicles and infantry attempting to traverse it. Cons: Like the B-17, it too is vulnerable to AA fire. Bottom Line: Worth clearing out a path for — but make sure your troops get out of the vicinity before this monster plows into the ground. Call-In Nuclear StrikeCost: $4000Tech Level Required: 3 You probably already know the impact of a tactical nuclear device, and if you don’t you can probably guess: major, mind-blowing devastation. War Front doesn’t depict the effects of a true, hydrogen-based nuclear weapon, but rather what one would expect from an atomic bomb designed for tactical use. Pros: Nothing in the immediate vicinity will survive more than a few seconds; the shock wave will rattle buildings and vehicles outside the blast zone; and the bombed area will emit poisonous radiation for a brief period after the initial detonation. Cons: It costs a pretty penny, but fortunately the bombers that deliver the payload are more adept at dodging or absorbing enemy fires than the B-17s and Lancasters delivering less-powerful weapons. Bottom Line: Use it when you can. ‘Nuff said. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 2 ---*---*---*--- German ForcesStrength: Armored ForcesMotto: “Blood and Iron”Most Appropriate For: Intermediate to Advanced Skill Levels Wehrmacht InfantryCost: $100Army Points: 1Hit Points: 60 While no one questions the bravery, courage or effort of other infantry in World War II, it’s almost universally agreed that the Wehrmacht’s foot soldiers were, man for man, the best-trained and most effective in either theater of war. Pros: Like all infantry in War Front, the Wehrmacht units are cheap, quickly produced, and have the capability to capture both buildings and vehicles. Cons: Almost defenseless against armored units, and essentially useless in bringing down enemy structures. Bottom Line: Their ability to capture buildings and be deployed as paratroopers gives them value even when you’re able to make more advanced infantry or armored units. Wehrmacht PanzerfaustCost: $200Army Points: 1Hit Points: 80 These German infantry wield Panzerfausts, which in real life were cheap, disposable, and preloaded anti-tank weapons not to be confused with Panzerschrecks, a reusable bazooka-style weapon. Pros: Inexpensive option for defending against lightly armored enemy units or taking down enemy buildings. Cons: Only slightly more resilient than Wehrmacht Infantry, and when used in close groups to maximize their firepower they’re highly vulnerable to enemy artillery. Bottom Line: Because they can be dropped as paratroops, these units are excellent for pinpoint attacks behind enemy lines to destroy key installations. They also excel at defending bases from similar attacks by the enemy. Jetpack InfantryCost: $400Army Points: 3Hit Points: 75 Although jetpacks are now considered more a novelty item than anything else, the Germans — ever seeking a technological edge in a war where they were outnumbered and outgunned — actually created a prototype jetpack called the Himmelstürmer. The Himmelstürmer was designed to provide short jumps (up to 60m), mainly to bypass obstacles like minefields, waterways, or defensive fortifications. Pros: Even a small force of Jetpack Infantry can wreak havoc in an enemy base, since they can “jump” to safety — or to a new target — as soon as you see the enemy respond to their presence. They’re also useful on the open battlefield: landing behind large, slow-moving vehicles, they can often inflict great damage or even destroy them before the lumbering enemy can respond. Cons: They move quite slowly on foot, and lack the ability to capture buildings or vehicles. Bottom Line: Maximizing a squad of Jetpack Infantry can be a high-maintenance task—but the rewards can be equally high! ExoskeletonCost: $1050Army Points: 3Hit Points: 300 Like jetpacks, walking war machines were originally the purview of science fiction; unlike jetpacks, they’ve never emerged from that domain — at least not in real life. Pros: Exoskeletons are faster than tanks, eat up few Army Points, and are equipped with both machine guns and rockets, making them one of the most versatile ground units in your arsenal. Cons: Relatively low hit points, especially on a cost-per-dollar basis. Bottom Line:  Their speed and versatility achieve optimal effect when you encircle a major target, preventing several of them from receiving collateral damage from an explosion. They’re also great base defenders. Flammwagen APCCost: $700Army Points: 2Hit Points: 250 German engineers loved to produce specialized variants on existing vehicles, and perhaps no vehicle saw so many iterations as the Sdkfz 251: there were 23 official types, and an unknown number of iterations that weren’t officially classified. The Sdkfz 251/16, or “Flammpanzerwagen,” was a half-track that could carry up 12 soldiers (including the crew) and flamethrowers as well as an MG 34 machine gun. Pros: There’s a reason this costs more than the Panther: it dishes out a lot more damage in a shorter amount of time. Cons: Lightly armored, and it must stop and face the enemy when unleashing its fiery payload — a drawback that exposes it to damage from even weak foes. Bottom Line: Speedy and packing a high-powered punch, the Flammwagen can be rushed to trouble spots in a base-defense role or sent out to eliminate infantry or weaker armored enemies such as the Allied Priest or Russian Katyusha. PantherCost: $530Army Points: 3Hit Points: 210 The Panther, or Panzer V,  was the German response to the Russian T-34, a tank that outgunned and outmaneuvered earlier incarnations of the Panzer line. In the real World War II, it would easily have outclassed the Matilda and T-70, its two enemy equivalents in War Front. Pros: You don’t need to advance to Tech Level 2 to produce it, and it’s the equal of the enemy’s Tech Level 1 tanks. The turreted gun means it doesn’t have to face an enemy in order to fire. Cons: Weak armor doesn’t make up for the speed of this relatively smallish tank. Bottom Line: The Panther in War Front isn’t reflective of its real-life counterpart, so don’t build a lot of them thinking it is. TigerCost: $1000Army Points: 4Hit Points: 390 In the first year it saw action, the Tiger was more noted for mechanical failures than its battlefield prowess. As the war shifted and the Germans went over to the defensive, however, this heavy tank struck fear in the hearts of America, British, and Russian tank crews. Pros: Judged on its costs in terms of resources and Army Points, this is probably the best tank in the German lineup. Cons: The only negatives come when compared to other German tanks: it doesn’t have the firepower and armor of more expensive armored units like the Maus tank or Elephant tank killer. Bottom Line: Can go head-to-head with the Soviet T-34 and outclasses the Allied Sherman. Sonic TankCost: $1500Army Points: 5Hit Points: 250 Although most sonic weapons are aimed at inducing aural pain to incapacitate individual soldiers, a huge sonic blast could — in theory — cause vibrations that would shatter buildings and vehicles. Pros: Get these tanks close enough to a target, and the devastation is massive and fast. The turreted weapon allows the Sonic tank to circle targets while delivering damage. Cons: Getting them there. Sonic tanks have amazingly light armor for a unit carrying this price tag, and it’s awfully disappointing to see them so easily crushed by artillery or even anti-tank infantry. Bottom Line: Great for assaults on enemy bases, provided they’re fronted by heavily armored tanks. MausCost: $1510Army Points: 6Hit Points: 500 The heaviest tank to be developed into a working prototype during World War II, the Maus wielded a mighty 128mm cannon and a 75mm coaxial gun and sported steel armor that was 240mm thick in some places. If it had been used in the war, its weight would have been too great for many bridges. The Germans planned for it to ford rivers or, if they were too deep, to submerge and cross on the bottom, using snorkels for air and cables attached to another Maus for electrical power. Pros: Super-heavy armor gives it staying power, and that big cannon gives it major killing power. You can’t ask for more in a tank. Cons: Slower than the Tiger, so it’s not well-suited for fast-moving operations; it also takes longer to produce Bottom Line: This is the tank to build if you have the resources, time, and are planning a straightforward assault. ElephantCost: $1520Army Points: 6Hit Points: 450 A major component of WWII tank-warfare doctrine was that certain vehicles were designated as “tank killers” — essentially self-propelled anti-tank gun platforms. This was the role of the Elephant (“Elefant” in German). It was initially called the “Ferdinand” after its designer, Ferdinand Porsche, but after some design changes it was officially called the Elephant on Hitler’s orders. (Note: A strict vegetarian, Hitler often remarked to acquaintances that the elephant was the strongest of all land animals, yet ate no meat.) Pros: Delivers a mighty wallop against even the largest enemy tanks, and is well-armored. Cons: Like nearly all anti-tank vehicles in World War II, the Elephant lacks a turret and must directly face its opponent when attacking. Not surprisingly, it’s also slow. Bottom Line: Pair it up with the Maus, Hummel, and some AA vehicles to create a powerful and well-rounded armored battalion. WurfrahmenCost: $750Army Points: 2Hit Points: 260 The chassis of the Sdkfz 251 is again put to good use, this time as a mobile rocket launcher. The Wurfrahmen 40 featured side-mounted rocket launchers, while the Wurfrahmen auf Infanterieschlepper sported a rear-mounted frame for launching rockets and resembles the unit seen in War Front.. Pros: Cheap, long-range artillery unit that can be ordered to bombard any spot on the battlefield. A great choice for mobile base defense because it doesn’t drain valuable power supplies. Cons: A bit thin in terms of armor, and because it is artillery its projectiles take a while to reach the target. Bottom Line: An excellent value in terms of resources and production time. You’ll probably be using this even when the Hummel is available. HummelCost: $1225Army Points: 5Hit Points: 350 The fast pace of blitzkrieg combat necessitated the need for self-propelled artillery, and thus was born the Hummel. It offered the firepower of traditional artillery, but could also move fast enough to keep up with Panzer forces that were spearheading breakthroughs in enemy lines. Pros: A true champion when it comes to reducing enemy buildings to rubble. Cons: Neither its ammunition or its howitzer are suited for combat against moving vehicles. Bottom Line: Although it can absorb more damage than the Wurfrahmen, the Hummel still needs the protection of other armored units (or significant numbers of ground troops). WirbelwindCost: $600Army Points: 2Hit Points: 210 Built using the Panzer IV chassis, the Wirbelwind was equipped with four rapid-firing AA guns. Although relatively few Wirbelwinds were produced during the war, they were known to be used against Allied infantry — an ability that is not reproduced in War Front. Pros: Highly economical anti-air defense option that doesn’t drain power supplies. Cons: Unlike AA Bunkers, they’re vulnerable even to enemy infantry, and they count toward your Army limit. Bottom Line: A quick, easy solution for anti-aircraft defense at your base early in the game, and almost an essential for any mobile armored force. RheintochterCost: $1260Army Points: 3Hit Points: 150 German arms designers and manufacturers were known for ideas ahead of their time, and the Rheintochter is one of them. Although it never was deployed during the war, the Rheintochter was a much more simple version (it relied on human control for flight and detonation) of the surface-to-air missiles developed in the 1950s and 1960s. Pros: It’s a “one shot, one kill” device: it never misses, and the target always goes down. Cons: Long reload time and weak armor. Bottom Line: Mix them in with Wirbelwinds for a mobile, powerful AA system. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 3 ---*---*---*--- Me 262Cost: $930Army Points: 3Hit Points: 200 If not for Adolf Hitler’s insistence that the Me 262 be developed as a bomber, it might have entered the war much sooner — and that could have had a major impact on the outcome of the air war over Germany. Instead, the first operational jet fighter didn’t see action until August, 1944, and by then the massive number of Allied bombers meant it had to focus on them rather on dogfighting. Pros: A speedy interceptor that matches up well against enemy fighters, and it can put a major hurt on bombers. Cons: Fairly expensive, and its ground-support role is limited to attacking infantry and light armor. Bottom Line: Despite its limitations, you should always have a few of these at your disposal to protect your Stukas from Mustangs and Yak-9s. StukaCost: $1100Army Points: 4Hit Points: 300 For thousands of Allied soldiers, the Stuka’s trademark siren meant it was time to take cover. But the German dive bomber earned its deadly reputation early in the war, when the Luftwaffe had unchallenged air superiority. When improved Allied fighters arrived, the Stuka’s slow speed and sluggish maneuverability led to extremely high loss rates in the last two to three years of the war. Pros: An adequate ground-attack aircraft, especially adept at hitting moving targets. Cons: Like the Me 262, it’s fairly expensive for its class; unlike the Allied P-38 Lightning, there’s no way to upgrade its bomb-only capability. Bottom Line: Just as in real life, the Stuka is not up to par with the ground-support airplanes of the Allies or Russia. Giant ZeppelinCost: $5000Army Points: 5Hit Points: 1000 In the first few years of World War I, Zeppelins were able to drop their bombs almost at will over English soil, but the arrival of faster fighters and incendiary ammo rendered the Zeppelins obsolete. The Giant Zeppelin in War Front is a rigid airship with high-powered cannons and strong armor to protect against fire from AA guns and enemy fighters. Pros: The cannons mounted on the Giant Zeppelin can easily take out super-heavy tanks fielded by the Allies and Russians, and is invaluable in reducing major buildings. Cons: This lumbering craft has a high number of hit points, but unfortunately they bleed away rather quickly when enemy AA guns train their sights on the big target. Bottom Line: Perfect as a heavily armed “guardian angel” traveling above an armored formation that’s equipped with AA vehicles to protect it from enemy fighters. Call-In Junkers BomberCost: $1200Tech Level Required: 1 Though perhaps most famed for the Ju 87 Stuka, Junkers manufactured a slew of aircraft for Germany, particularly in the bomber and transport classes. The six-engine bomber depicted in War Front resembles the Ju 390, a prototype with a range of over 6,000 miles. Pros: Can be built at Tech Level 1, and it delivers damage to a fairly wide area. Cons: Interceptors can provide protection from enemy fighters, but the slow Junkers can be brought down rather quickly by ground-based AA fire. Bottom Line: Always send along Me 262s to not only protect against enemy fighters, but also draw away AA fire from this large plane. Call-In Horten BomberCost: $2000Tech Level Required: 2 The Luftwaffe always seemed to have great designs in the works, but the vast majority never made it into production. Such was the case with the Horten 229, a jet-powered “flying wing” bomber that was the forerunner of today’s B-2 Stealth bomber. Pros: The extra money you spend for the Horten rather than the Junkers is worth it: this bomber can take much more damage than the Junkers and still deliver the goods. Cons: Despite the extra armor, the Horten can still be brought down by fire from AA guns and interceptors; you must reach Tech Level 2 before you can call in the Horten. Bottom Line: Unless you’re strapped for resources, you should always opt for the Horten over the Junkers. V1/V2Cost: V1 Launch Pad $3000, $4000 to upgrade to V2Tech Level Required: 2 for V1, 3 for V2 upgrade The V1 and V2 are generally considered the world’s first guided missile and first ballistic missile, respectively. Although their accuracy was poor, their ability to strike without warning (or very little warning, in the case of the V-1) gave the Allies incentive to seek out and destroy their launch sites, diverting forces that would otherwise be used in the move into Germany. Pros: Neither the V1 or V2 can be brought down by AA fire. Cons: A V2 launch not only carries considerable resources costs, but also the time spent reaching Tech Level 3. And while the V1 is more accurate than the V2, there’s no guarantee that either will hit the precise point you target. Bottom Line: A V1 or V2 blast can flatten a large area and deflate an opponent’s morale. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 4 ---*---*---*--- Russian ForcesStrength: InfantryMotto: “Power In Unity”Most Appropriate For: Intermediate and Advanced Skill Levels Red Army InfantryCost: $100Army Points: 1Hit Points: 60 How many men could the Soviets deploy into battle? Consider this: by December 1, 1941, the Russians suffered between four and five million casualties — but after all that they managed to have 280 rifle and cavalry divisions and 44 tank or mechanized brigades in the field for a counterattack. About 500,000 men a month were drafted into the war until its end. Pros: There’s nothing that elevates these troopers over the Allied and German soldiers, but they’re produced slightly more quickly — and when you’re producing a lot, “slightly” matters. Cons: The same as with any infantry unit: they’re fodder for armored units and practically useless against buildings. Bottom Line: Red Army Infantry can prove useful throughout a battle because they can capture buildings and vehicles, and they are the only ground troops available for paratroop drops. Molotov InfantryCost: $150Army Points: 1Hit Points: 70 Ironically, Molotov Cocktails were first used by the forces of Francisco Franco’s forces in the Spanish Civil War—forces supported by Nazi Germany. Their next major role came in the Russo-Finnish war when they were used not by the Russians, but by the Finns: they sarcastically nicknamed the homemade petrol bombs “Molotov Cocktails” because Soviet politician Vyacheslav Molotov claimed the Russian planes dropping bombs were really dispensing food. Pros: They cost 50% more than Red Army infantry units, but do considerably more damage against any type of vehicle or building they attack. Cons: None. Bottom Line: Consider these lowly soldiers an integral part of your strategy — even one can do significant damage before being killed. Red Army MedicCost: $250Army Points: 2Hit Points: 50 The Soviets immediately termed the war against the German invaders as a “Great Patriotic War,” and despite years of oppression and brutality the vast majority of the Russian people chose their Motherland over collusion with the Nazis—not knowing the Nazis would have killed them regardless. Huge numbers of volunteers, many of them women, tended the Soviet wounded, and fighting such a brutal war on their own soil provided the Red Army troops a bit of reassurance their Nazi counterparts could never hope for. Pros: Medic units automatically heal wounded units in their vicinity, which means they survive and advance in experience level—making them even more deadly to the enemy. Cons: They’re doctors, not soldiers, damn it—which is a Star Trek way of saying they have no offensive capabilities whatsoever. You also have to reach Tech Level 2 to train them. Bottom Line: Expensive for infantry units, but you should definitely produce several to accompany soldiers you send into battle. KomissarCost: $210Army Points: 1Hit Points: 75 Although some Soviet apologists will argue the specifics, the fact remains: komissars were often positioned near the front line to ensure Soviet troops didn’t desert. Their deterrent? An execution on the spot. In one recorded incident, a divisional commander at Stalingrad gathered his men, gave a speech on the need for courage—then walked down the front line of the formation and shot every tenth man in the head. Now that’s motivation! Pros: His pistol deals a great deal of damage, and boosts the rate of fire of troops around him. Cons: Slightly expensive. Bottom Line: The Soviet army kept them with their troops, and look at the results. Do the same. PartisansCost: $1500 ($300 per Partisan)Army Points: 5Hit Points: 50 [Note: Partisans are not produced at installations, but we include them here because they are infantry units.] The Nazis assumed the Soviet people would rise in revolt against a regime that brutally oppressed them. That assumption would have been correct if the Nazis hadn’t brutalized the Russians on an even more barbaric scale, and the role partisans played in the defeat of the German invaders can hardly be understated. Pros: Partisans can appear anywhere on the map...even in places where the “fog of war” is still in place and you have no intelligence about what’s there. Cons: You can’t produce them one at a time, so if you’re short of resources you might have to wait for the opportunity to insert these guerilla warriors behind enemy lines. Bottom Line: Consider yourself lucky: the Allies and Germans have nothing that matches the stealth ability of these freedom fighters! Vodka DealerCost: $330Army Points: 2Hit Points: 50 First things first: there were no “vodka dealers” per se in the Soviet Army. But Red Army soldiers did have a penchant for the clear liquor, and as anyone who’s imbibed more than a moderate amount knows, it does give you a feeling of invincibility. Pros: Doesn’t get much better than this: any infantry unit in the Vodka Dealer’s radius cannot be killed. Cons: Relatively low hit points…perhaps he should drink some of his own stock! Bottom Line: Like the Medic and Komissar, consider the Vodka Dealer an essential part of any infantry squad you send into battle. ZIS 42Cost: $720Army Points: 2Hit Points: 150 The Zis 42 was a half-track vehicle typically used in a cargo-transportation role in World War II. Pros: Highly effective against infantry, and its troop-carrying capacity (12) gives it added value. Cons: Very light armor, especially compared to enemy APCs. Bottom Line: There are probably better units you can spend resources on than this one. APC MoleCost: $1350Army Points: 3Hit Points: 250 The term “mole” usually applies to a spy, but in this case the term is literal: the APC mole burrows underground and digs a tunnel to the target destination. Needless to say, this technology did not exist in World War II—or if it did, someone really dropped the ball on using it. Pros: Carries up to 10 troops and can pop up anywhere on the map. Cons: The vehicle itself is defenseless. Bottom Line: Coordinate an attack with an APC Mole filled with Molotov Infantry, Komissars, and Vodka dealers along with Partisans, and you’ve caused a major headache for the enemy. T-70Cost: $360Army Points: 3Hit Points: 180 If the Sherman was the K car of World War II tanks, the T-70 was the Mini-Cooper: fast but undergunned, it still served a role in the Soviet war effort because it was easy to produce. The success of the T-34—and the way that tank warfare evolved to encompass many more tank-on-tank battles—spelled the demise of this little spitfire. Pros: Cheap, cheap, cheap. Cons: You get what you pay for: the T-70 has the lowest hit points of any Tech Level 1 Tank. Bottom Line: You might need to build some, but don’t get carried away and build too many just because you haven’t hit Tech Level 2 yet. T-34Cost: $760Army Points: 4Hit Points: 270 When the Germans invaded the Soviet Union in 1941, the last thing they expected was a tank that not only matched their finest armored beast, but also surpassed it in every way. Some German tanks at the end of the war might have outgunned the T-34, but for the bulk of the conflict it was the standard by which all medium tanks were judged. Pros: An inexpensive tank that can square off with anything the enemy forces can throw at it. Cons: The cheap resource price comes at the expense of one extra Army Point over enemy equivalents. It doesn’t sound like much, but it can add up if you’re cranking them out for a big armored assault. Bottom Line: At this price, you can afford to make them and say to hell with the extra Army Point. Ice SpitterCost: $960Army Points: 4Hit Points: 250 We are all familiar with “dry ice,” a substance cold enough to cause frostbite on contact with skin. Given the incentive to create new superweapons that could turn the tide of war—coupled with the Russian weather—would it be surprising to see a weapon that pushes dry ice from the realm of commercial use into the role of an offensive weapon? Pros: When an Ice Spitter attacks, everyone stops to take notice—because they can’t move even if they wanted to. Works on buildings as well as vehicles. Cons: Aside from freezing objects in place, the Ice Spitter does no damage. Bottom Line: Use it in conjunction with even weak units like the T-70 tank, the Zis 42, or Molotov Infantry: once an object is frozen, it tends to break up easily when hot lead hits it! IS-3 StalinCost: $1152Army Points: 6Hit Points: 400 When the Soviets saw the new Panther and Tiger tanks deployed by the Germans at the Battle of Kursk in 1943, they knew they needed something with greater firepower and more armor than the T-34. This eventually led to the development of the “Iosif Stalin tank,” or IS series. The IS-2 saw action in World War II, while the IS-3—with its trademark rounded turret and angled front hull—was first shown to western observers at the Allied Victory Parade in Berlin in September, 1945. Pros:  Much heavier armor gives the IS 3 greater survivability than the Tiger, and its gun deals out a lot more damage. Cons: Slower than the T-34, and you must upgrade your War Factories to produce them. Bottom Line: An essential unit once the enemy is able to produce heavy tanks. Kharkov RampagerCost: $1600Army Points: 7Hit Points: 1800 As the German situation grew more desperate and the Nazis were constantly on the defensive, they turned to ever-larger vehicles wielding massive guns and sporting amazingly thick armor in the hopes they could stand up to the Russian onslaught. The Kharkov Rampager is a hypothetical response to German prototypes like the Maus: its stupendously thick armor means it can absorb incredible amounts of punishment and still continue to knock out enemy tanks and artillery. Pros: The armor is so thick, you can pretty much send this behemoth straight into enemy fire and know it will take down more than its share of enemies before it’s destroyed. Use the Rampage skill to increase its killing capacity even more (best utilized when the tank is dug in). Cons: Slow movement and turning means more nimble units can get in many hits before the Rampager is able to respond. Bottom Line: German and Allied commanders will curse when they see this giant lumbering toward their forces. ZSU-37Cost: $480Army Points: 2Hit Points: 190 Talk about a second-hand design: the Zsu 37 was built using the SU-76 chassis, which in turn was built using a lengthened T-70 chassis. Developed late in the war, when German air superiority had flagged. Pros: Like many Soviet units, it’s cheaper than its Allied and German cousins, and it performs better than the Bofors. Cons: Thin armor makes it more vulnerable to enemy fire. Bottom Line: An inexpensive, quick way to provide stopgap AA defense at a base, and a crucial part of any armored battalion. KatyushaCost: $640Army Points: 3Hit Points: 150 Perhaps no images are more associated with Soviet firepower in World War II than footage of rockets screaming from Katyusha launchers. The Germans nicknamed them the Katyusha the “Stalin Organ,” and the rocket-launcher assembly itself could be mounted on almost anything: tractors, flatbed trucks, and even gunboats. Pros: The Katyusha is quickly produced and boasts an amazingly long range, allowing you to drop fire on distant enemy vehicles and fortifications. It also has a surprisingly fast rate of fire. Cons: Flatbed trucks are great for hauling stuff, but they don’t hold up too well when fired upon: it only takes one or two hits from a tank or several Bazookas/Panzerfausts to finish them off. Bottom Line: It’s difficult to imagine this much firepower for such a low cost. You’ll still be producing this Tech Level 1 unit at the end of even very long battles. Moving Giant TurretCost: $1600Army Points: 6Hit Points: 1300 There is quite possibly nothing as unnerving to an enemy as a long-range artillery attack. One moment, troops and tanks are moving into position; the next they lay broken and shattered, crushed without warning. Pros: The range of the Moving Giant Turret is simply mind-boggling, which means it can take your opponent quite a while just to figure out where the barrage is originating from—and then he has to figure out how to get units there to stop it. Cons: This long-range deathbringer moves even more slowly than the Kharkov Rampager, and it must stop in order to fire. Particularly vulnerable to anti-tank infantry or light, speedy vehicles like the Flammwagen or Halftrack. Bottom Line: As a Soviet commander, you have no better tool than this for bringing down important enemy structures. ---*---*---*--- Page Break : page break 5 ---*---*---*--- YakovlevCost: $900Army Points: 3Hit Points: 180 There were several variations of this single-engine fighter produced over the course of the war: in War Front, you’ll be deploying the famous Yak-9. Even though German bombing raids hampered production, the plane proved to be highly successful. Pros: Can escort Sturmoviks on bombing raids to protect them from enemy fighters, as well as lure AA guns into not firing on vulnerable Tupolev or Winter’s Breath Call-In Bombers. Cons: Weak armor means even fire from enemy interceptors is enough to bring these nimble planes crashing to the ground. Bottom Line: One reason you should focus on ground forces in your quest for victory. SturmovikCost: $1100Army Points: 4Hit Points: 280 Just like the Russian people, Soviet industry answered the call to battle when the Germans invaded. One of its most impressive feats was the Ilyushin Sturmovik: between the Il-2 and Il-10, over 36,000 were built. The Il-2 is the model featured in War Front. Pros: Can provide quick strikes to enemy fortifications and installations, as well as serve in a ground-attack role against slow-moving enemy armor or infantry formations. Cons: Like the Yakovlev, the Sturmovik’s armor is weak in comparison to enemy fighter-bombers. Bottom Line: Keep some of these available at all times, but building too many is a waste of Army Points better spent on infantry or armored units. Call-In Tupolev BomberCost: $1200Tech Level Required: 1 The Tupolev TB-3 was a four-engine heavy bomber used by the Soviet Air Force in the 1930s and 1940s. Of course, any plane that was in service in the 1930s stood little chance of success by the middle of the war, and after 1942 the Russians pulled them from duty after 1942. Interestingly, the Soviets considered using the TB-3 as a way to airlift small tanks into battle zones. Pros: An inexpensive way to lay waste to a large area of enemy territory. Cons: Slow and unmaneuverable, the TB-3 is especially vulnerable to AA fire. Bottom Line: Make sure you’ve cleared out any sources of AA fire, and try to have some Yakovlevs in the target area to deal with any enemy interceptors that might shoot down this antiquated bomber. Call-In Winters BreathCost: $2500Tech Level Required: 3 With the Ice Spitter technology perfected, the Soviets decided to extend its icy welcome through the use of air delivery. Pros: Its payload instantly freezes everything in an extremely large radius: even buildings are unable to produce units until the ice has melted. Cons: The TB-3 is the bomb platform the Soviets have chosen for the TB-3, so the same disadvantages apply. You also need to reach Tech Level 3 before you can access this weapon. Bottom Line: Don’t waste the resources on this unless you are ready to move in with other units capable of shattering the frozen enemy buildings and vehicles. Call-In Artillery StrikeCost: $2000Tech Level Required: 3 The Call-In Artillery Strike is even more nerve-shattering to your enemies than the devastation of the Moving Giant Turret because there’s nothing they can do stop it (aside from capturing your Radio Station, that is). Pros: The area of destruction is large, and the damage is significant. Cons: Not as accurate as a bombing strike or shelling by the Moving Giant Turret, and the reload time is rather long. Bottom Line: Just imagining your enemies tearing their hair out because there’s nothing they can do to stop this explosive downpour is reason in and of itself to give the order to open fire! Now that you’re an encyclopedia of death, get more tips and tactics, as well as full walkthroughs of the Allied and German campaigns in the rest of our guide.

The first warplane designed by the Lockheed Corporation was a doozy. Although its top speed (360 mph) was not breathtaking, its nose-mounted armaments packed a wallop: four .50-caliber machine guns and a 20mm cannon, augmented by rocket launchers and/or bombs. The Germans called it the “Twin-Tailed Devil”—and probably prayed to God every time they saw it descend in a tactical support role to devastate airfields, rail lines, and troop transports.

Pros: Like the Mustang in the Interceptor class, neither the Russians or Germans can produce a Fighter-Bomber close to the Lightning. It’s especially deadly once you research the Air-To-Ground Capability: a single Lightning can bring down defensive bunkers and other smaller buildings.

Cons: None

Bottom Line: Consider the Lightning the most essential tool in your tactical weapons arsenal!

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