Tributes to Leonard Nimoy

Tributes to SF legend Leonard Nimoy have been pouring in after the announcement of the actor’s death on Friday.

His co-stars in the classic original series of Star Trek, William Shatner and George Takei, both took to Twitter to express their feelings of loss.

Shatner posted, "I loved him like a brother. We will all miss his humor, his talent, and his capacity to love."

Takei, meanwhile, quoted a line of dialogue from The Wrath Of Khan:


The inheritor of the role of Spock, Zachary Quinto, left a touching message on Instagram. “My heart is broken. I love you profoundly my dear friend. And I will miss you everyday. May flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.”

Trek director JJ Abrams, meanwhile, posted a hand-written message: “What a man you were, what a life you lived. As funny and thoughtful and generous and loving as you were talented. You taught us all, at every encounter. We will miss and love you forever.”

Others figures from the world of Star Trek also shared their sadness.

Patrick Stewart tweeted, “I was lucky to spend many happy, inspiring hours with him. He won't be forgotten.”

Stewart’s Next Generation co-star Jonathan Frakes simply stated, “RIP to the best First Officer.”

Gates McFadden described Nimoy as “the epitome of sci-fi icons, artist of intelligence and great depth”, while Marina Sirtis called him, “a true gentleman.”

Wil Wheaton thanked the actor, explaining, “We stood on your shoulders, and wouldn’t have had a galaxy to explore if you hadn’t been there, first. “ Wheaton has also written a blog on his feelings about Nimoy’s passing.

This was just a small part of a global outpouring of grief, of course.

Remarkably, The White House released the following statement from President Obama:

“Long before being nerdy was cool, there was Leonard Nimoy. Leonard was a lifelong lover of the arts and humanities, a supporter of the sciences, generous with his talent and his time. And of course, Leonard was Spock. Cool, logical, big-eared and level-headed, the center of Star Trek’s optimistic, inclusive vision of humanity’s future.
I loved Spock.
In 2007, I had the chance to meet Leonard in person. It was only logical to greet him with the Vulcan salute, the universal sign for “Live long and prosper.” And after 83 years on this planet – and on his visits to many others – it’s clear Leonard Nimoy did just that. Michelle and I join his family, friends, and countless fans who miss him so dearly today.”

Obama has history when it comes to declaring his affinity for Spock; in 2012 he was pictured making the Vulcan salute when Nichelle Nichols visited the Oval Office.

Other well known figures who paid tribute include Trek fan Seth MacFarlane, (“Leonard Nimoy brought us one of the greatest, noblest characters in the history of American storytelling. Someone find the Genesis planet.”), Neil Gaiman (“A wonderful man”), Firefly star Nathan Fillion (“I have been, and always shall be, your fan”), cult hero Bruce Campbell (“He lived long and prospered”) and, in the following video message, astronauts Mike Fincke and Luca Parmitano.

But the comment that particularly resonated with us, as Star Trek fans who didn’t know Nimoy but – perhaps like you – somehow, felt that we did, came from novelist John Scalzi.

“If you're having trouble understanding the grief over Leonard Nimoy’s passing, here it is: every geek just lost their favorite grandparent.”

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