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The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion review

Welcome to the first day of the rest of your role-playing life

Videogaming has never seen such a meticulously detailed digital landscape, let alone one so beautifully realized. Mountainous, tree-dotted vistas implore you to spin around and take it all in. Between the nine architecturally and culturally diverse cities and the equally varied outdoor locales and dungeons, the in-game world of Cyrodiil feels real. Light blooms off guards' armor at high noon while bathing the sky in hue-tiful purples and oranges at dawn and dusk.

But it's the sheer volume of never-tedious things to do that makes Oblivion a bar-raising masterpiece. In the approximately 50 hours we spent living a virtual life in Cyrodiil, we never once felt bored or shortchanged, whether we were purging orcs from overrun towns or saving artists who'd gotten trapped inside their magical paintings (requiring you to go into the artwork, watercolor walls and all). You'll find countless side jobs and quests; each of the fourmajor side-stories - one for each main workers' guild -takes longer to play through than most entire games these days. Throw in all sorts of other non-obvious goodies like rideable horses, hidden shrines, player-creatable spells and even unicorns and vampires (the latter of which you can become yourself), and the sheer quantity of content is alarming.

More Info

GenreRole Playing
DescriptionThe fourth Elder Scrolls entry is utterly brilliant and should not be missed by any adventure-spirited gamer.
PlatformPC, Xbox 360, PS3, PSP
US censor ratingMature
Release date21 March 2006 (US), 24 March 2006 (UK)
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