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NHL 2K7 - Review

So many features, it makes us want to shout "YIPPIE!" But we just can't

The 2K Team didn't just upgrade the animations; they wanted to invent a whole new way to experience hockey games, and they've dubbed it "Cinemotion." Cinemotion refers to everything related to their new presentation - camera angles, cutscenes, music, and sound effects.

The new camera dynamically follows the puck down the ice, keeping you close to the action without ever obscuring the bigger picture, so you'll still be able to see open players to target passes. It never hinders gameplay, and helps make some of the little graphical flares more apparent as you play. We never felt like flipping over to one of the old ¾ or overhead views - the new camera felt just right.

"Cinemotion Music" refers to dynamic music which changes in intensity and volume to reflect what's happening on the ice. In overtime, for example, the music crescendos and picks up pace, while during lulls in the game it fades into the background. We wouldn't blame you for turning off the dynamic music - while it's an interesting idea, the orchestral vibe makes the game feel more like a battle from The Lord of the Rings than hockey. It's another reason we're glad we can mix and match commentary, existing music or a custom soundtrack. Meanwhile, players, coaches, and even fans can be heard shouting across the rink in various accents as they react to events on the ice. It's especially effective in surround sound.

Also considered a part of Cinemotion is the overall presentation of the games. The idea is to get you pumped up - the game begins with the coach addressing his players in the locker room, and then follows them out to the ice where lasers fire and lights flash. Unfortunately, the whole thing feels more embarrassing than exciting, especially since the generic coach looks more frightening than he does compelling.

More Info

GenreSports
DescriptionThough it feels more like an add-on than a new game, the current-gen version of NHL 2K7 succeeds due to its solid predecessor and bargain price.
PlatformXbox, PS3, Xbox 360, PS2
US censor ratingEveryone 10+
Release date12 September 2006 (US), 12 September 2006 (UK)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Associate Editor, Digital at PC Gamer
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