Killzone: Liberation - hands-on

We riddle Helghast troopers with death in gritty top-down shootouts

We also like how the game handles cover; when you're crouched behind a crate or some debris or whatever, you can pop up and take a few potshots just by hitting the fire button, after which you'll automatically crouch back down again. So long as you're not hiding behind something destructible or explosive, it makes taking down waves of Helghast a lot easier. (Not as easy as hopping into one of the game's tanks or hovercrafts does, maybe, but still easy.)

The simplicity even extends to the game's buddy system. At certain points during the game, you'll meet up with your sidekick, Sgt. Rico, and while he'll usually just follow up around and watch your back, you can also order him around. Just hit up on the d-pad, and the action will slow to a crawl while you decide what to do. Instead of picking from a list of commands, you'll be able to choose from several strategic points Rico can move to, or just pick an enemy you want him to attack.

Not having to worry about complicated controls enables you to concentrate on what matters: eviscerating armored Helghast troops with fiery volleys from your assault rifle. Speaking of which, you'll start with a weak but super-accurate gun that fires four-shot bursts, but you can easily trade up to Helghast weapons - ranging from shotguns and machine pistols to sniper rifles and rocket launchers - by opening any of the supply chests littered conveniently throughout each stage (unfortunately, you can only carry one at a time). You can also unlock and upgrade new weapons and abilities between stages, although working up enough "credits" to do this takes some time.


After graduating from college in 2000 with a BA in journalism, I worked for five years as a copy editor, page designer and videogame-review columnist at a couple of mid-sized newspapers you've never heard of. My column eventually got me a freelancing gig with GMR magazine, which folded a few months later. I was hired on full-time by GamesRadar in late 2005, and have since been paid actual money to write silly articles about lovable blobs.
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