Here's what happens in Kong: Skull Island's post-credits scene

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I had a chance to see an early screening of Kong: Skull Island last night, and since there have been some whispers about what its post-credits scene might entail, I wanted to go ahead and clear that up for everyone right here. Obviously, there are spoilers ahead, so don’t read on if you don’t want to know who makes it off the island alive. This is your final warning.

After escaping the island at the end of the film, the post-credits scene begins with Tom Hiddleston’s James Conrad and Brie Larson’s Mason Weaver sitting in an interrogation room at Monarch, the organization responsible for tracking “massive unidentified terrestrial organisms,” or MUTOs. The two characters are staring into a reflective one-way glass window and trying to convince the mysterious people on the other side that they’ll go about their lives without telling anyone anything about what they saw on Skull Island. Suddenly, Corey Hawkins’ Brooks and Tian Jing’s San, two scientists who were with them on the island, burst into the room and explain how Kong isn’t the only king in the world.

They throw a couple of files on the table and turn on a projector, beginning a slideshow that reveals photographs of primitive cave paintings. There’s no mistaking who these paintings depict: Godzilla, Mothra, Rodan, and King Ghidorah. The final slide ominously shows Godzilla locked in battle with Ghidorah with tiny humans caught in the balance, and the movie smash cuts to a black screen as Godzilla’s roar rumbles through the theater’s speakers.

We’ll next see Godzilla on the big screen in Godzilla: King of the Monsters on March 22, 2019, and Legendary has already dated a Godzilla vs. Kong movie for May 29, 2020.

Directed by Jordan Vogt-Roberts, and starring Tom Hiddleston, Brie Larson, Toby Kebbell, Tom Wilkinson, John Goodman, Samuel L. Jackson, and John C. Reilly, Kong: Skull Island opens in the UK and US on March 10, 2017.

Image: Warner Bros.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ben is an entertainment journalist who has written about movies online for nearly a decade. He loves the Fast & Furious franchise, prefers Indiana Jones to Star Wars, and will defend the ending of Lost until his dying day. He shook Bill Murray's hand once (so he's got that going for him, which is nice). Ben lives in Los Angeles with his wife.
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