Dark Sector - updated hands-on

High-stress gunfights, flying buzzsaws and horror come together as we mutilate our way through abandoned Eastern Bloc streets

The plants, however, had grown over doors and elevator shafts we needed to use, and presented a more serious obstacle. Luckily, this was where the Glaive really started to shine, as we were introduced to its element-absorbing, puzzle-solving qualities. Tossing it into a lightbulb enabled it to absorb the electricity within, which in turn could be used to ignite a massive gas leak we discovered after toppling a statue in the building's central atrium. Hurling the Glaive into the resulting column of fire ignited it (which didn't seem to bother Hayden any), and its flames worked destructive wonders not only against the zombies, but against the stupid plants that were blocking our path.

After we'd picked our way through the building and back outside, the demo concluded with Hayden running right into one of the heavily armed "choke points" set up by the Lasrian soldiers. Before they could do much of anything, however, a gigantic infected creature called an "old one" - which we're told will be the area's boss - leapt onto the scene and smashed everything that moved (ignoring Hayden, thankfully) before angrily climbing over a nearby building and lumbering away toward the beacon we'd been searching for. This was also where the demo ended, leaving us without the payoff of fighting some massive horror to the death.

Still, the demo was impressive, considering that the game won't be out until 2008. Its combination of Gears-style action, a horrific atmosphere and Zelda-inspired puzzles has a lot of potential, and we're looking forward to seeing how the game will fulfill its promise of constantly giving players new things to learn and completely new challenges to overcome. At any rate, it'll be interesting to see how the game - and its protagonist - develop as Dark Sector moves closer to release.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

After graduating from college in 2000 with a BA in journalism, I worked for five years as a copy editor, page designer and videogame-review columnist at a couple of mid-sized newspapers you've never heard of. My column eventually got me a freelancing gig with GMR magazine, which folded a few months later. I was hired on full-time by GamesRadar in late 2005, and have since been paid actual money to write silly articles about lovable blobs.
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