V V RRRR AAA L L Y Y 333 V V R R A A L L Y Y 3 3 V V --- RRRRR AAAAA L L Y 33 V V R R A A L L Y 3 3 V R R A A LLLLL LLLLL Y 333 V-RALLY 3: GAME GUIDE by Jamie Stafford/Wolf Feather FEATHER7@IX.NETCOM.COM Initial Version Completed: January 31, 2003 Version 5.0 Completed: February 21, 2003 ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== JOIN THE FEATHERGUIDES E-MAIL LIST: To be the first to know when my new and updated guides are released, join the FeatherGuides E-mail List. Go to http://www.coollist.com/group.cgi?l=featherguides for information about the list and to subscribe for free. ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== CONTENTS Spacing and Length Permissions Introduction Menus Autoload/Autosave Drivers Points V-Rally Mode Time Attack Mode Challenge Mode Tuning Navigatorspeak (English Language Audio) General Tips Racing Tips: Braking Racing Tips: Cornering Racing Tips: Coasting Racing Tips: Weight Shifts Racing Tips: Wet-weather Racing/Driving Stage Overviews Vehicle Set-ups: Overview Vehicle Set-ups: 1.6L FWD Class Vehicle Set-ups: 2.0L 4WD Class Vehicle Set-ups: Bonus Car Class Regular Cars Unlockable Items and Features Extra Challenges Diagrams Online Resources Contact Information ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== SPACING AND LENGTH For optimum readability, this driving guide should be viewed/printed using a monowidth font, such as Courier. Check for font setting by making sure the numbers and letters below line up: 1234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012 ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz This guide is now approximately 95 pages in length in the Macintosh version of Word98 using 12-point Courier font. Therefore, printing this guide in its entirety may not exactly be a great idea. ============================================== PERMISSIONS Permission is hereby granted for a user to download and/or print out a copy of this driving guide for personal use. However, due to the extreme length, printing this driving guide may not be such a good idea. This driving guide may only be posted on: FeatherGuides, GameFAQs.com, f1gamers.com, Games Domain, PSXCodez.com, Cheatcc.com, gamesover.com, Absolute-PlayStation.com, RedCoupe, InsidePS2Games.com, CheatPlanet.com, The Cheat Empire, a2zweblinks.com, Gameguru, cheatingplanet.com, GameReactors.com, RobsGaming.com, neoseeker.com, CheatHeaven, IGN, ps2fantasy.com, and vgstrategies.com. Please contact me for permission to post elsewhere on the Internet. Should anyone wish to translate this driving guide into other languages, please contact me for permission(s) and provide me with a copy when complete. Remember: Plagiarism in ANY form is NOT tolerated!!!!! ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== INTRODUCTION V-Rally 3 is the first appearance of the V-Rally series on PlayStation2. Not surprisingly, its graphics are excellent, the cars have many more tuning options, the sounds are better and more convincing, and the fun factor has been raised :-) Unfortunately, however, Track Editor (which allowed the player to create original rally stages and circuits) is not included in V-Rally 3, which is a severe disappointment :-( The main focus of V-Rally 3 is its career mode (appropriately entitled V-Rally Mode). In fact, V-Rally 3 simply CANNOT be played until at least one driver has been created; only then can the various gameplay modes be accessed. The created driver(s) can then be used in V-Rally Mode to progress from the 1.6L FWD (Front Wheel Drive) category up to the 2.0L 4WD (Four Wheel Drive) category of competition. V-Rally Mode is explained in further detail below. Also available are two quick race options: Time Attack Mode and Challenge Mode. Time Attack Mode is self-explanatory. Challenge Mode sets the player on three or more stages, which must all be completed within a specified time limit. One of the best things about V-Rally 3 is that there is rather little time spent in loading each stage. For all the graphic detail, this is quite amazing. It also helps that there is a screen providing information on each stage as it is loaded, providing the player something to look at and consider as the stage is being loaded. The Gran Turismo series, perhaps the most successful racing series on PlayStation and PlayStation2, introduced rally racing in Gran Turismo 2, and then brought it back with many visual changes and a few new venues in Gran Turismo 3. This is likely the first experience with rally racing for many PlayStation and PlayStation2 gamers. While Gran Turismo 2 includes two point-to-point stages (which were unfortunately eliminated from Gran Turismo 3), the Gran Turismo series primarily feature circuits, which are fairly rare in actual rally racing. To this extent, the V-Rally series is much more realistic than the Gran Turismo series, although the Gran Turismo series certainly excels in its vast multiplicity of tuning options. Please note that some of the information in this guide come from some of my other guides, with appropriate modifications: General Racing/Driving Guide V-Rally 2: Game Guide World Rally Championship: Game Guide ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== MENUS Menu navigation can be slightly tricky in V-Rally 3, which is why this has been given its own special section. At the bottom of a menu screen, the various categories will be listed. Using the D-pad to move to the left or the right will move to the next category in that direction. As each category is selected, its sub-categories will appear above the category title, with the upper-most sub-category already highlighted; pressing the up and down buttons on the D-pad will move through the sub-categories. It is important to note that until a sub-category has been selected (by pressing the 'X' button), pressing the left or right buttons on the D- pad will move to the next category in the appropriate direction. Until a player becomes accustomed to this system, it is very easy to inadvertently move from one category to another. On the positive side, virtually all menus in V-Rally 3 include full-motion rally-related animation. This can range from the player's vehicle arriving at the next Service Area to full-out racing action. ============================================== AUTOLOAD/AUTOSAVE V-Rally 3 uses an autoload/autosave feature by default. Saves to the global game options files can take a long time, especially the first time such a file is created on the memory card. Afterward, especially when dealing with a driver's save file, this process is VERY fast. The autosave feature can be changed by selecting Misc. -> Save from the Options menu screen. ============================================== DRIVERS It is impossible to play V-Rally 3 until at least one driver has been created. In fact, the first time V-Rally 3 is played (or if all the driver files have been erased from the memory card in Memory Card Slot 1), the game will force the player to create a driver. Driver creation is done in multiple steps. First, the player must enter a last/family name for the driver, then a first/given name. Second, the player can choose a nationality for the driver (by selecting the appropriate flag from the nationality screen; as each flag is selected, the country's name is indicated, so this can also be a good way to learn to recognize some of the flags of the world). Finally, the driver's look/appearance can be selected by using the left and right buttons on the D-pad to rotate through the possibilities. Unfortunately, there are NO female driver 'looks' available in V-Rally 3, which can be perceived as a definite slap in the face toward female players. While most rally drivers (and navigators) have historically been male, there have been a few females in rally racing competition, such as Andrea Aghini. Driver creation is important, because V-Rally Mode (the game's career mode) uses each driver's file to save career information; the driver file also contains information for Time Attack Mode and Challenge Mode. Driver files are saved independently on the memory card, so the only real limit on the number of drivers available is the amount of space on the player's memory card. Once at least one driver has been created, Delete will delete a selected driver. Compare can be used to compare the records and performance of any two drivers. Comparisons are done across each gameplay mode and overall. Pressbook should actually be titled 'Pressbooks,' because there are really two volumes involved. One volume lists a driver's stage and career records, while the other volume more closely tracks the driver's career (including a bar graph noting the driver's ups and downs in a career, once a minimum of two seasons have been completed). Note that Pressbook can also be accessed from various screens in V- Rally Mode, thus providing the player with up-to-the-moment information on her or his rally racing career. ============================================== POINTS There are two 'types' of points used in V-Rally 3. First, within V-Rally Mode (the game's career mode), points are awarded to the top-placing drivers at each rally based upon how they finish the rally (those drivers who do not successfully complete all five stages of a rally - i.e., those who retire early due to vehicle breakdown, severe accident, or player cancellation - WILL NOT receive any points for that rally): Place Points Place Points Place Points ----- ------ ----- ------ ----- ------ 1 25 6 10 12 4 2 20 7 9 13 3 3 16 8 8 14 2 4 13 9 7 15 1 5 11 10 6 16 0 11 5 As mentioned in the Drivers section (above), any two drivers can have their records (Pressbooks) compared. This comparison can be done by gameplay mode and by overall records. All comparisons are based upon points for each feat in the game (such as besting the default time in Time Attack Mode, or by winning championships in V-Rally Mode) - with the best-performing driver in each area receiving one point - attained across the three gameplay modes of V-Rally 3: Time Attack Mode Each country has eight total stages (four initial stages, and the reverse configuration of each stage). The driver receives one point for each stage where she or he has set the record time for the stage. Thus, a grand total of forty-eight points can be attained in Time Attack Mode. Challenge Mode Each challenge offers a number of points determined by the number of stages involved in the challenge. Points are only offered for the default challenges; player- created challenges (via Extra Challenges) are not included in the Pressbook. A total of twenty-four points are available within Challenge Mode, with the best-performing driver in each challenge receiving an appropriate number of points: Saxo 3 points Pirelli 6 points Polo 4 points Michelin 6 points 206 5 points V-Rally Mode The calculation of points for V-Rally Mode is the default value listed below multiplied by the number of times a driver has accomplished a given feat. For example, a Rally Victory is worth three points; a driver who has won twenty rallies will earn a total of sixty points based solely upon rally victories. Rally Victories 3 points each 1.6L FWD Titles 10 points each 2.0L 4WD Titles (V-Rally Titles) 20 points each Note that due to the never-ending nature of V-Rally Mode, this is the only gameplay mode with no cap on the number of points a driver can acquire in the game. Therefore, if Driver A has received the maximum number of points from Time Attack Mode and Challenge Mode, Driver B could still be deemed the overall 'better' driver for having played through numerous seasons and won an insane number of rallies (and potentially championships). ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== V-RALLY MODE This is the main area of focus in V-Rally 3, allowing a player to pursue a rally racing career. V-Rally Mode begins with the player's Office, where a career is managed (and to where the player returns between rallies). The Office menu allows the player to access and read e-mails, view driver and team rankings in both the 1.6L FWD and 2.0L 4WD classes, personal data and goals, and the driver's pressbook. The final category, 'Rally!,' takes the player to the first/next rally of the season. E-mails are important. Some are from various rally racing magazines and Web sites, providing information about how the season is progressing. Others are from various teams, either offering potential driving contracts (usually via driving tests first) or other team-related information. Once the player has selected a team and signed a contract, the team manager will also send e-mails with information and/or motivation. [To this extent, the lack of cutscenes featuring interactions between the player's chosen driver and various personnel (team manager, other drivers, etc.) is quite apparent, especially for those who have played the excellent PlayStation2 game Pro Race Driver.] In some cases, the player can even 'create' responses to the received e-mails. While it is possible to simply move on to the next rally without reading any of the e-mails (once a contract has been signed for a season), it is best to at least read the subject headers of all the available e-mails to be able to take advantage of any test drives which may become available based upon the player's performance in the previous rally or rallies. Each rally season is a bit different. There are four rallies in the 1.6L FWD category and six rallies in the 2.0L 4WD category each season. However, the counties hosting each rally and stages of each rally tend to be modified (i.e., selected at random by the CPU) for each season, so it is simply not possible to expect to run the exact same stages season after season after season; this is one of the things which separates V-Rally 3 from other rally racing games such as World Rally Championship (which uses much longer seasons, but all the stages are always in the same order across all levels of gameplay difficulty). Service Areas are the only places at which vehicle repairs can be effected, and these come at various points throughout each rally; this means that it may be necessary to drive two or more stages between Service Areas, which can be particularly important if a vehicle is carrying a lot of damage for several consecutive stages. More importantly, each team is permitted only thirty minutes to effect repairs on a vehicle, and each type of repair takes a given amount of time to perform, so player selection of what should be repaired at each Service Area is highly important - ALMOST as important as keeping the rally car on the roadway and NOT incurring any damage. It is important to make repair decisions quickly, especially if EVERYTHING needs to be repaired, because the thirty-minute clock begins counting down as soon as the player enters the Service Area; time wasted in making decisions can potentially mean that one or more aspects of the vehicle cannot be repaired in the time remaining. At the beginning of each rally and immediately after each Service Area, the player can adjust the car's tuning to maximize performance in the upcoming stage(s). The various tuning options are more fully explained below in the Tuning section. It is extremely important to make use of the stage information, to closely study the maps and read the information on the anticipated conditions (of both the roadway and the weather), as this will be the greatest determinant of how a vehicle is tuned. Note that should a player participate in multiple seasons in the 2.0L 4WD category, the placement or the positioning of the Service Areas in each rally is prone to change. For example, in the first two or three seasons, the first Service Area will follow the first stage of a rally. In later seasons, the first Service Area in some rallies will instead come after the SECOND stage of a rally. Between seasons, the player can choose to move on to other teams based upon the e-mails received in the Office. Again, this will generally first require a test drive, followed by a contract proposal should the player perform well enough in the test drive. Fortunately, while test drives require the player to complete a given stage within the time limit specified, there does not appear to be any problems should the car become damaged, so long as the stage IS completed within the specified time limit. The player should anticipate approximately thirty minutes to complete a (five-stage) rally in V-Rally Mode. In most cases, even with taking a few minutes to consider car set-ups at each opportunity, a full rally should not take this long, but it is certainly better to plan for too much time than for too little time :-) Also, in V-Rally Mode, there will often be times when the player must successfully complete two or more rally stages before arriving at a Service Area to repair any damages and tune the car for the next set of stages. The player will likely be forced to make some potentially-difficult decisions when running consecutive stages without a Service Area; for example: 1.) If the first stage has 85% mud and 15% wet gravel, and the second stage has 100% loose gravel, which tire compound is best to produce lower times across the combined stages? 2.) If the first stage has numerous tight, twisty corners with virtually no straightaways between them, and the second stage has only very minor corners and rather lengthy straightaways, what is the best gear ratio setting to use across the combined stages? 3.) If the first stage has severe foggy conditions and the second stage has pristine daylight conditions, how will these visibility issues affect vehicle set-up and/or driver performance? Obviously, it is not always possible to achieve a 'happy medium' between consecutive stages when the stages involved are extremely different. This is where A LOT of educated guesswork comes into play. In these situations, it is very important for the player to be consciously aware of the Human and vehicle limitations and strengths. Also, if the player has previously amassed a great lead (of time) over the rest of the competitors, then the player can lose a given amount of time on one stage and excel on the other by tuning 'only' for one of the stages (fully recognizing that time will be lost on the other stage, but still tuning and driving in such as manner as to attempt to minimize the time which will be lost in this endeavor). Unless the player has explicitly switched to manual saving, quitting V-Rally Mode will AUTOMATICALLY save game progress. Therefore, should the player not like her or his performance in a rally, the only way to be able to re-enter V-Rally Mode from the previous save point is to restart the console and reload the game, re-entering V-Rally Mode normally. ============================================== TIME ATTACK MODE Time Attack Mode is the player's opportunity to try out various stages to record the lowest possible completion time; the current lowest completion times are always displayed on the stage information screen as each stage is loaded in preparation for each mode's gameplay. There are various options to customize the Time Attack Mode experience, from selecting the rally and stage (in the forward or reverse configuration) to vehicle selection to tuning. First, the player is required to select a driver (at least one driver must be available in order to play V-Rally 3). Next, the player can select a rally; selecting a host country for a rally brings up a sub-screen where the player can select a stage, but only the first stage in each rally is initially available. Vehicle selection is next. There are a number of cars in the 1.6L FWD and the 2.0L 4WD class from which to choose, but a selection of bonus cars may also be available based upon the bonus vehicle(s) the player has received in progressing through the game. Once a car has been selected, the player can view detailed data on the chosen vehicle, and can also take a Close View - which allows the player to customize the car's look and/or features, rotate the vehicle using the left and right buttons on the D-pad, and zoom in and out. Next, the car's set-up can be adjusted. See the Tuning section (below) for details. Once all this has been set to the player's liking, it is time to hit the stage!!! At the completion of the stage, the player is given the option to save the time just completed. Next, the player can choose to rerun the stage, view a replay, view the telemetry for the stage (which details the player's performance in relation to the optimal racing line for that stage), or exit back to the Time Attack Mode menu. Note that for each country, there are four stages shown, but only one stage is initially available; beating the default record time at each stage unlocks the next stage. Once the fourth stage's default record time has been bested, then the player can select from all four stages in either the forward or reverse direction on future Time Attack Mode attempts. ============================================== CHALLENGE MODE Here, the player must complete various challenges. Challenge Mode sets the player on three or more stages, which must all be completed within a specified time limit. The stages are not necessarily from the same rally, meaning that the player will likely be presented with vastly different terrain types. First, the player must select a driver; at least one driver must be available in order to play V-Rally 3. Then the player can select a challenge from among those presented (by using the left and right buttons on the D-pad), and view the car used for the challenge. Next, the player is shown the times to beat for the challenge. The player can also customize the car's tuning; see the Tuning section below for details. Then, the player heads to the first stage. Following the first stage, the player is shown the performance (time) and given the opportunity to view a replay, and then is allowed to prepare in the same manner for the second stage; this repeats for all the stages. Upon the completion of the final stage of a challenge, the player may be shown a trophy presentation and given the name of the next challenge. Please note that some challenges must be completed with a specific vehicle, whereas other challenges will allow the player to choose from a small selection of vehicles. Also, once a challenge has been successfully passed, the next challenge in the series will become available, and all previous challenges can also be selected. There are only five default challenges in Challenge Mode. Once Extra Challenges has been unlocked, any created challenges will appear for selection after the default challenges. However, created challenges and their record times DO NOT appear in a driver's Pressbook (or in a driver comparison, which is based upon the Pressbook concept). ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== TUNING There are various tuning options available in many gameplay modes of V-Rally 3. Note that once a tuning sub-category has been selected, adjustments are made in a pop-up mini-screen. Tires Selection There are twelve tire compounds offered in V-Rally 3, and each team selects the three which should be best-suited for a given rally (indicated at the bottom of the Tire Selection sub-screen). However, the player can override the team's decisions and choose from any of the twelve available tire compounds. Proper tire selection is EXTREMELY important, as selecting the wrong tire compound for a stage can slow the car by up to several seconds PER SECTOR. However, since most of the stages in V-Rally Mode (the game's career mode) are run consecutively without any Service Areas and opportunities to change vehicle settings, this will sometimes mean a MAJOR compromise on one stage in order to attain the best possible time on another stage. Pressure Lowering tire pressure flattens the tire and allows more of the tire to grip the roadway, but this sacrifices top-end speed. Conversely, raising tire pressure increases top-end speed by reducing the contact area and overall grip with the roadway. Chassis Suspension The suspension allows for a given amount of movement in the axles, and should be ideally set so that the main body of the car not pitch or jump around due to bumps. For smooth surfaces, a hard suspension setting is best. For rough or bumpy surfaces, a softer suspension is best (allowing for more axle movement). Ride Height Ride height is important for both regulating the passage of air underneath the vehicle and for ensuring the vehicle does not scrape the roadway, especially at the top of jumps and crests and when landing after a jump. Higher ride height settings slow the car somewhat due to more air passing underneath the vehicle, but reduce the chances of the car bottoming out (which can slow the vehicle even more). Lower ride height settings can slightly increase overall speed due to less aerodynamic friction, but greatly increase the possibility of the underside of the car scraping the roadway. Stabilizers Stabilizers are designed to ensure the vehicle remains upright, thus reducing the potential for a rollover incident (especially when cornering quickly). A higher stabilizer setting provides more stability, but cornering can be more difficult. A lower setting creates a greater risk of a rollover accident, but cornering can be made easier at higher speeds. Mechanics Gearbox Ratio Shorter gear ratios provide faster and stronger acceleration, but at the sacrifice of top-end speed. Longer gear ratios provide faster top-end speed, but acceleration will be slower and weaker. Differentials This controls the amount of power going to each wheel of the car. Brakes Brake settings here can be made in two areas. First, brake balance can be adjusted, so that the maximum braking power can be located more toward one end of the vehicle (if centered, then 50% of the braking power goes to the front wheels with the remaining 50% going to the rear wheels). Independent of brake balance is brake strength (which can also be adjusted in the driving-specific tuning options below). A harder brake strength reduces the required braking zone before a corner, whereas a softer brake strength necessitates a longer braking zone. Also, harder brake strength settings risk to create wheel-lock if the brakes are applied harshly (which is a natural driver reaction if an accident is about to occur), thus causing the vehicle to slide and not decelerate properly. There are also driving-specific tuning options which can be made on a separate screen before heading to the stage(s). Note that once a driving-specific sub-category has been selected, adjustments are made in a pop-up mini-screen. Car Options Gear Box Select between Automatic and Manual Transmission. This is set to Automatic by default. Steering This controls steering sensitivity, or the amount of delay between button press and car response Acceleration This controls the rate of acceleration Brakes This controls brake strength. Note that this DOES NOT handle brake balance, which can only be adjusted in the actual Tuning section. Ghost Activate and deactivate the ghost car (if applicable) Controller Configure Change button configuration Vibration Select between low, medium, and high vibration rate It is important to remember that these tuning options can only be accessed at the beginning of a rally and immediately after each Service Area. Therefore, it may be necessary to think several stages ahead in terms of tuning options, which means that the vehicle may not perform well in one stage but will likely excel in another. Also, when a player takes part in a teams' driving test in V- Rally Mode (the game's career mode), the player is not permitted to tune the vehicle. ============================================== NAVIGATORSPEAK (ENGLISH LANGUAGE AUDIO) V-Rally 3 (in the North American version) offers audio in English (the default setting), French, and Spanish. This section covers the navigator's driving instructions in English. The navigator will give instructions to inform you of the many twists and bumps in the road ahead. Many times, these instructions are spot-on, although at times they are given just as you reach the specific corner or caution mentioned. Sometimes, however, the instructions are not quite exact, so take care to not follow the instructions to the letter without questioning. For this reason, it is also important for the player to keep looking as far ahead as possible, so as to not be mislead by any incorrect instructions and to also (hopefully) spot any potential shortcuts or unannounced areas of potential danger. If the sign panels at the top-center of the screen are activated, these will exactly mimic visually what the navigator is saying. Further, two panels are shown; the bottom panel represents the current instruction, whereas the top panel (largely off-screen) indicates the following instruction. The top panel will slide down to the bottom when appropriate. Distance: The navigator will sometimes indicate distance. This is measured in meters (remember that one meter is slightly longer than thirty-nine inches). '100' and '150' are the most common distance calls, although distances as long as '250' are also used on occasion. Direction: The navigator will indicate whether the upcoming turn is to the left or the right. '2' Corners: These turns have the harshest angles, and almost always require braking. '3' Corners: These are moderate corners. Braking may be required, depending on the surroundings and the car's speed entering these corners. '4' and '5' Corners: These are the turns with the slightest angles, and can generally be taken at flat-out acceleration. 'And:' This functions as a conjunction, indicating that the second instruction immediately follows the first instruction. It is also possible to be given a 'sentence' with 'and' used repeatedly to join multiple instructions. Note that 'and' can be interchanged with 'into' without any change in meaning; however, 'and' is used more often because it is shorter to pronounce. 'Care:' This catch-all call indicates a dangerous section ahead. This could include steep embankments, deep ditches, a narrowing of the road, a minor jump or crest, or other potential problems. 'Caution:' This catch-all call is stronger than the 'Care' call. Some slowing may be in order here. (There may also be the Caution symbol - an exclamation point in a white triangle bordered in red - which appears at the center-top of the screen at times, but no auditory instructions noting that a dangerous area or obstacle is ahead, so it is always important for the player to keep her or his attention at least moderately focused upon the visual instructions at the center-top of the screen.) 'Crest:' This call indicates a rise in the road ahead which will obscure the view if using one of the in-car cameras. 'Cut:' This means that a corner SHOULD be able to be shortcut at least slightly without causing any damage to the vehicle. 'Don't Cut:' Perhaps the most important utterance from the navigator, this call indicates that shortcutting the apex of the upcoming corner will produce extreme danger. This can range from large rocks or boulders at the apex to an unprotected cliff drop-off. This call takes on added importance when on a steep uphill or downhill grade during a turn, especially in hairpin corners. 'Flat:' A corner with this designation is even gentler than a '5' corner, and can easily be handled at full acceleration without any difficulties. 'Hairpin' Corners: Interestingly, many so-called 'hairpins' are actually U-shaped, double-apex corners. 'Into:' See 'And,' above. 'Jump:' This call indicates a rise that will send the car airborne if taken at full speed. 'Keep' + Direction: Stay to the indicated side of the roadway in order to avoid one or more obstacles or dangers. 'Long:' The upcoming corner is long. While this is not always the case, a corner designated as 'long' will often include an implied 'tightens.' 'Narrows:' The road ahead will narrow. 'Opens:' The upcoming corner has an increasing radius. Use caution in accelerating, as accelerating too soon could result in hitting obstacles or flying off cliffs. 'Outside:' Instead of cornering normally (outside to apex/inside to outside), keep a wide berth around the corner in order to avoid one or more obstacles or dangers. 'Straight:' Listed in the game manual but not actually used in the game, this call indicates to go straight through the upcoming (slight) turns. 'Tightens:' The upcoming corner has a decreasing radius. Slowing will almost certainly be required before exiting the corner. While this is not always the case, a corner designated as 'long' or 'very long' will often include an implied 'tightens.' 'Tunnel:' There is a tunnel ahead. This is an important warning, meaning that the driver must be sure to remain on the official roadway to avoid slamming into the side(s) of the tunnel. 'Very Long:' The upcoming corner is extensive and will seem to go on forever. While this is not always the case, a corner designated as 'very long' will often include an implied 'tightens.' ============================================== GENERAL TIPS Buy or rent or borrow any game in the Gran Turismo series, but especially Gran Turismo 2 or 3. In one of these games, work through the License Tests, as this will teach how to approach the various elements of racing, from judging braking distances to controlling a car on a surface with little grip. Gran Turismo 2 introduced rally racing to the series, so GT2 and GT3 both include a Rally License; the time and effort spent in acquiring the Rally License in GT2 or GT3 will help with World Rally Challenge. Overall, Gran Turismo 2 is probably a better choice of the three games in the Gran Turismo series, as GT2 includes the Pikes Peak Hill Climb and Pikes Peak Downhill courses, the only point-to-point rally venues in the series thus far (all other rally events are held at actual circuits); unfortunately, both Pikes Peak stages were removed for Gran Turismo 3 :-( In rally racing, the principles of standard pavement-based racing apply. However, there is generally less tire grip in rally racing, which makes anticipation a key element in correctly holding a tight racing line at the apex of a corner, in judging braking distances on a steep downhill grade, etc. In general, '4' and '5' corners do not require braking to safely clear; '2' corners and hairpins DO require braking; '3' corners may necessitate braking depending on the surroundings and the entry speed. However, if on a steep uphill or downhill grade, even '4' corners may require braking, while possibly '2' corners will not necessitate braking. Hairpins ALWAYS require braking. Do not depend solely upon the navigator's instructions and the sign icons at the top-center of the screen (if activated) to drive cleanly through each stage. Try to look as far ahead as possible and use the lay of the land to determine what the road ahead will entail. Most roads follow the contours of mountains, using a series of switchbacks for climbing and descending steep mountainsides; those with even moderate backpacking experience will be easily able to recognize these contour patterns and thus be better able to anticipate upcoming corners. On occasion, visibility is clear so far ahead that it is possible to see turns several hundred meters - or more - beyond what the navigator is currently saying. Some roads leave one particular mountain and run along an adjacent mountain, and this can sometimes also be seen across a valley. For those roads atop short ridges or in vast plains, it is often possible to see the various turns far ahead. Try to use really tall objects such as trees - and especially telephone poles, as they are almost ALWAYS located directly next to the road - to determine the location and severity of upcoming turns. While not always the case, hairpin corners in V-Rally 3 often come in pairs (with each corner leading in an opposite direction). This is good to remember for anticipating upcoming corners. Proper tire selection is EXTREMELY important, as selecting the wrong tire compound for a stage can slow the car by up to several seconds PER SECTOR. However, since most of the stages in V-Rally Mode (the game's career mode) are run consecutively without any Service Areas and opportunities to change vehicle settings, this will sometimes mean a MAJOR compromise on one stage in order to attain the best possible time on another stage. To the extent possible, ALWAYS brake in a straight line. If braking only occurs when cornering, the car will likely be carrying too much speed for the corner, resulting in the car sliding, spinning, and/or flipping. (While a car may not necessarily flip in this situation, a slide or spin can still mean the difference between winning and ending up in last position at the end of a stage.) There may also be the Caution symbol - an exclamation point in a white triangle bordered in red - which appears at the center-top of the screen at times, but no auditory instructions noting that a dangerous area or obstacle is ahead, so it is always important for the player to keep her or his attention at least moderately focused upon the visual instructions at the center-top of the screen. It is best to always keep one finger hovering over the reposition button (set to the L1 button by default if using a standard controller). Should this button accidentally be pressed while actually on the roadway, nothing will occur. However, once the vehicle spins, flips, and/or leaves the roadway, pressing this button will generally quickly reposition the car on the roadway. This is obviously FAR faster than trying to slow enough to regain control of the vehicle and return to the roadway normally. Especially in the 2.0L 4WD category, this is very important, as it will be significantly more difficult to win rallies than in the 1.6L FWD category. On occasion, various animals will cross the roadway in front of the player' chosen vehicle. There is no need for concern or even for evasive action in these situations, as these are effectively just moving holograms and do not cause any damage at all (or even vibrations) to the vehicle (think of the holodeck technology with the safety protocols engaged in the various post-1985 Star Trek series and films). It is important to remember that in the points standings, should the player be tied with a CPU-controlled driver, the CPU-controlled driver will be officially ranked ahead of the player :-( ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== RACING TIPS: BRAKING The first step in driving fast is knowing when, where, and how much to slow down (braking). In some games, a brake controller can be acquired or purchased, allowing the player to customize the brake strength by axle or by adjusting the bias of the brakes toward the front or the rear of the car; in other games, this is part of the 'stock' feature of the cars. The use of a brake controller will affect the braking zone, as will other factors. Specifically, the car's speed on approaching a corner, the amount of fuel in the car at a given moment, the drivetrain of the car, the weight of the car, and even the car's center of gravity can all affect the braking zone. Similarly, the driving conditions - sunny, overcast, damp, wet, icy, snowy etc. - will affect the braking zone for each corner (as well as the car's ability to attain high speeds). Except for purely arcade-style games, the braking zone will differ somewhat for each car depending upon its strengths and weaknesses. It certainly helps for the player to try a Free Run or a Time Trial (if these modes exist in a given game) to learn the circuit(s) - including the braking zones. When looking for braking zones, try to find a particular stationary object near the entry of each corner; it helps tremendously if this object is far enough away from the circuit that it will not be knocked over during a race. To begin, try using the brakes when the front of the car is parallel with the chosen stationary object. If this does not slow the car enough before corner entry or if the car slows too much before reaching the corner, pick another stationary object on the following lap and try again. Whenever changes are made to the car - whether to the brake controller or to other aspects of tuning and/or parts - it would be a good idea to go back into Free Run mode and check that the braking zones still hold; if not, adjust as necessary using the method in the paragraph above. For those races which include fuel loads, the car will become progressively lighter during a race. The lesser weight can often mean a slightly shorter braking zone; however, if tire wear is excessive (especially if there have been numerous off-course excursions), that might dictate a longer braking zone. Cars with a higher horsepower output will inherently attain faster speeds, and will therefore require a longer braking zone than cars with a lower horsepower output. Try a Volkswagon New Beetle, a Mini Cooper, a Dodge Viper, a Panoz Esperante GT-1, a Corvette C5R, and an F-2002 (all in stock/base configuration) along the same area of a circuit and note how their braking zones differ. A final note on braking: To the extent possible, ALWAYS brake in a straight line. If braking only occurs when cornering, the car will likely be carrying too much speed for the corner, resulting in the car sliding, spinning, and/or flipping. (Some games purposely do not permit the car to flip, but a slide or spin can still mean the difference between winning and ending up in last position at the end of a race.) If nothing else, players should strive to become of the 'breakers' they possibly can. This will essentially force a player to become a better racer/driver in general once the player has overcome the urge to constantly run at top speed at all times with no regard for damages to self or others. Also, slowing the car appropriately will make other aspects of racing/driving easier, especially in J-turns, hairpin corners, and chicanes. ============================================== RACING TIPS: CORNERING Ideally, the best way to approach a corner is from the outside of the turn, braking well before entering the corner. At the apex (the midpoint of the corner), the car should be right up against the edge of the roadway. On corner exit, the car drifts back to the outside of the roadway and speeds off down the straightaway. So, for a right-hand turn of about ninety degrees, enter the corner from the left, come to the right to hit the apex, and drift back to the left on corner exit. See the Diagrams section at the end of this guide for a sample standard corner. For corners that are less than ninety degrees, it may be possible to just barely tap the brakes - if at all - and be able to clear such corners successfully. However, the same principles of cornering apply: approach from the outside of the turn, hit the apex, and drift back outside on corner exit. For corners more than ninety degrees but well less than 180 degrees, braking will certainly be required. However, for these 'J-turns,' the apex of the corner is not the midpoint, but a point approximately two-thirds of the way around the corner. J-turns require great familiarity to know when to begin diving toward the inside of the corner and when to power to the outside on corner exit. See the Diagrams section at the end of this guide for a sample J-turn. Hairpin corners are turns of approximately 180 degrees. Braking is certainly required before corner entry, and the cornering process is the same as for standard corners: Approach from the outside, drift inside to hit the apex (located at halfway around the corner, or after turning ninety degrees), and drifting back to the outside on corner exit. See the Diagrams section at the end of this guide for a sample hairpin corner. If there are two corners of approximately ninety degrees each AND both corners turn in the same direction AND there is only a VERY brief straightaway between the two corners, they may be able to be treated like an extended hairpin corner. Sometimes, however, these 'U-turns' have a straightaway between the corners that is just long enough to prohibit a hairpin-like treatment; in this case, drifting to the outside on exiting the first of the two corners will automatically set up the approach to the next turn. See the Diagrams section at the end of this guide for a sample U-turn. FIA (the governing body of F1 racing, World Rally Championship, and other forms of international motorsport) seems to love chicanes. One common type of chicane is essentially a 'quick-flick,' where the circuit quickly edges off in one direction then realigns itself in a path parallel to the original stretch of pavement, as in the examples in the Diagrams section at the end of this guide. Here, the object is to approach the first corner from the outside, hit BOTH apexes, and drift to the outside of the second turn. There are chicanes of various types in rally racing, but they are not necessarily considered as such because the competitors tend to think corner-by-corner, and not complex- by-complex like circuit-based competitors. FIA also seems to like the 'Bus Stop' chicane, which is essentially just a pair of quick-flicks, with the second forming the mirror image of the first, as shown in the Diagrams section at the end of this guide. Perhaps the most famous Bus Stop chicane is the chicane (which is actually called the 'Bus Stop Chicane') at Pit Entry at Spa- Francorchamps, the home of the annual Grand Prix of Belgium (F1 racing) and the host of The 24 Hours of Spa (for endurance racing). Virtually every other type of corner or corner combination encountered in racing (primarily in road racing) combines elements of the corners presented above. These complex corners and chicanes can be challenging, such as the Ascari chicane at Monza. See the Diagrams section for an idea of the formation of Ascari. However, in illegal street/highway racing, the positioning of traffic can 'create' the various corners and corner combinations mentioned here. For example, weaving in and out of traffic creates a virtual bus stop chicane (see the Diagrams section at the end of this guide). Slowing may be necessary - it often is - depending on the distance between the vehicles. See the Sample Circuit Using Some of the Above Corner Types Combines in the Diagrams section at the end of this guide; note that this is a diagram for a very technical circuit. At some race venues, 'artificial chicanes' may be created by placing cones and/or (concrete) barriers in the middle of a straightaway. One such game which used this type of chicane is the original Formula1 by Psygnosis, an F1-based PlayStation game from 1995, which used this at Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve along Casino Straight (shortly after passing the final grandstands at the exit of Casino Hairpin). One thing which can change the approach to cornering is the available vision. Blind and semi-blind corners require ABSOLUTE knowledge of such corners. Here is where gamers have an advantage over real-world drivers: Gamers can (usually) change their viewpoint (camera position), which can sometimes provide a wider, clearer view of the stage, which can be especially important when approaching semi-blind corners; real-world drivers are obviously inhibited by the designs of their cars and racing helmets. Great examples of real-world blind and semi-blind corners would be Mulsanne Hump at Le Mans, Turns 14 and 15 at Albert Park, each of the first three corners at A1-Ring, and many forest-based stages in rally racing. Also important to cornering - especially with long, extended corners - is the corner's radius. Most corners use an identical radius throughout their length. However, some are increasing-radius corners or decreasing-radius corners. These corners may require shifting the apex point of a corner, and almost always result in a change of speed. Decreasing-radius corners are perhaps the trickiest, because the angle of the corner becomes sharper, thus generally requiring more braking as well as more turning of the steering wheel. Increasing-radius corners are corners for which the angle becomes more and more gentle as the corner progresses; this means that drivers will generally accelerate more, harder, or faster, but such an extra burst of speed can backfire and require more braking. See the Diagrams section at the end of this guide for sample images of a decreasing- radius corner and an increasing-radius corner. For traditional road racing circuits, increasing-radius and decreasing-radius corners may not be too much of a problem; after several laps around one of these circuits, a driver will know where the braking and acceleration points are as well as the shifted apex point (should a shift be required). However, for stage-based rally racing, where the roads are virtually unknown and the driver knows what is ahead only because of the navigator's instructions (which - based upon notes - may or may not be absolutely correct), the unknown can cause drivers to brake more often and/or more heavily. For rally-based games, such as the Need for Speed: V-Rally series (PlayStation/PSOne/PlayStation2) or for World Rally Championship (PlayStation2), there is often specialized vocabulary used: 'tightens' generally designates that a corner has a decreasing radius, whereas 'widens' or 'opens' indicates that a corner has an increasing radius. This need for 'extra' braking is also tempered by the fact that in much of rally racing, corners are either blind or semi-blind, due to trees, buildings, cliffs, embankments, and other obstacles to clear vision all the way around a corner. One particularly interesting aspect of cornering is one which I honestly do not know if it works in reality (I am not a real-world racer, although I would certainly LOVE the chance to attend a racing school!!!), but which works in numerous racing/driving games I have played over the years. This aspect is to use the accelerator to help with quickly and safely navigating sharp corners. This works by first BRAKING AS USUAL IN ADVANCE OF THE CORNER, then - once in the corner itself - rapidly pumping the brakes for the duration of the corner (or at least until well past the apex of the corner). The action of rapidly pumping the accelerator appears to cause the drive wheels to catch the pavement just enough to help stop or slow a sliding car, causing the non-drive wheels to continue slipping and the entire car to turn just a little faster. Using this rapid-pumping technique with the accelerator does take a little practice initially, and seems to work best with FR cars; however, once perfected, this technique can pay dividends, especially with REALLY sharp hairpin corners, such as at Sebring International Raceway or those often found in rally racing. ============================================== RACING TIPS: COASTING Some players may believe that a good racer is ALWAYS either accelerating or braking. However, this is not always the best way to approach a given section of a circuit or rally stage. Coasting can sometimes be beneficial. First, consider standard street or highway driving. Street- legal cars are designed for the same foot to be used for both acceleration and braking (with the other foot used for operating the clutch if the vehicle uses a manual transmission). There is always a slight delay between acceleration and braking as the driver moves the foot from one pedal to the other; during this time, the vehicle is essentially coasting - that is, the vehicle's current momentum is the only thing moving the vehicle. In real-world racing, there are a number of drivers who use 'left-foot braking.' In other words, one foot is used for the accelerator, while the other foot is used for the brake pedal. Yet even in left-foot braking, a driver must take care to NOT be pressing both the accelerator pedal AND the brake pedal simultaneously, as this could cause the engine revs to spike and/or cause undue tire wear. Therefore, even though for a much shorter duration (perhaps best measured in hundredths of a second) than in standard 'right-foot braking,' there is always a short period of coasting. In many racing games, I find that coasting through tight corners (including tight chicanes) can sometimes be the best method to safely navigate these difficult sections - and this is true in both pavement-based games and in rally-based games. Certainly, braking properly (i.e., in a straight line BEFORE reaching the corner or chicane) is key to successfully coasting. However, using NEITHER the accelerator button NOR the brake button will cause the vehicle to coast, thus using the natural momentum of the vehicle to perhaps swing the vehicle around the corner or through the chicane. This is actually somewhat tricky to explain in words, and is really something that each player should try several times (especially on tight, technical circuits, such as Monaco and Bathurst, or virtually any stage of a rally-based game) to truly understand this technique. Once learned, however, players may easily find themselves adding this technique to their gaming repertoire :-) ============================================== RACING TIPS: WEIGHT SHIFTS Modern racing games are especially adept at simulating a vehicle's weight shift in a variety of situations. This section assumes that a vehicle is moving in a forward direction. When cornering, a vehicle's weight shift is to the opposite direction; in other words, if a vehicle is turning to the left, its weight will be shifted to the right (and vice versa). If the player attempts to corner too quickly, the resultant weight shift risks to slide the vehicle toward the outside of the turn; in extreme cases, the vehicle could lift and have only TWO wheels actually touching the ground, or potentially the vehicle could even flip onto its side or its roof!!! While it is certainly fun to see a vehicle on two wheels or on its side or roof, this is obviously counter- productive, especially in a close race or in a time trial mode. Tires and downforce play a role in helping to keep the vehicle on the ground during cornering, but once a given speed is surpassed for the type, radius, and angle of the corner in question, the player will have limited - if any - control of the vehicle. During acceleration, the vehicle's weight will naturally shift toward the rear. In most situations, this is not a particularly crucial phenomenon. However, if the vehicle is moving fairly slowly and the player suddenly slams on the accelerator, or especially if a race has a standing start (such as F1, TOCA, and rally races), this weight shift should be crucial. As the vehicle weight shifts to the rear of the vehicle, the rear suspension and tires could potentially take a lot of punishment. This is especially important for the tires, as the extra weight will require an appropriate amount of 'extra' acceleration (especially if the vehicle uses rear- wheel drive, which is true of many racing vehicles) to compensate and get the wheels to turn enough for the tires to adequately grip the racing surface to help to propel the vehicle forward. However, overcompensation could result in excessive wheelspin, which is quite likely to create undue tire wear. While braking, a vehicle's weight will shift toward the front of the vehicle. If the player brakes too late to corner safely yet still attempts to take the corner even semi- normally, the weight will load to the front outside wheel (in relation to the corner; i.e., to the front-left wheel if taking a right-hand corner) and risk causing the vehicle to slide off the course in the direction of the front-outside wheel. Even if not attempting to corner, the weight shift to the front during braking requires a little extra care to ensure that the front wheels do not lock (in those games which support wheel-lock, such as Pro Race Driver). In rally racing especially, the trick to successfully navigating many of the tight corners on the various stages is to use the vehicle's natural weight shifts to help successfully clear each section of the stage. This requires excellent knowledge of each rally car's capabilities and limitations, as well as superb anticipation and planning for each corner. Obviously, since most rallies are held on point-to-point stages, there is only one chance to successfully navigate each twist in the raceway, and using a vehicle's natural weight shift is crucial to 'getting it right' the first (and only) time!!! ============================================== RACING TIPS: WET-WEATHER RACING/DRIVING Almost everything written to this point in the guide focuses solely upon dry-weather racing/driving conditions. In fact, most racing/driving games deal ONLY with dry-weather conditions. However, simulation-based games (such as rally games) will include at least a few wet-conditions situations. This can range from Gran Turismo 3 - which uses two circuits (hosting a total of eight races between Simulation Mode and Arcade Mode) where the roadway has A LOT of standing water, as if the races take place just following a major prolonged downpour - to F1 2002 - where in most situations, players can purposely select the desired weather conditions for a given race. In wet-weather racing/driving conditions, it is IMPERATIVE to use tires designed for wet-conditions usage. For example, in F1 2002, in a full 53-lap race at Monza, I purposely tried running as long as I could with Dry Tires, then switched to Rain Tires when I could no longer handle the car's inherent sliding about... and my lap times instantly dropped by more than five seconds. In games which offer Intermediate Tires, such as Le Mans 24 Hours, the period when the racing circuit is simply damp (at the start of a period of rain, or when the circuit is drying after a period of rain) can be tricky in terms of tires. Intermediate Tires are certainly best for these racing conditions, but the time in Pit Lane spent changing to Intermediate Tires can mean losing numerous race positions, especially if the weather conditions change again a short time later and require another trip to Pit Lane to change tires yet again. Tires aside, simulation-style games simply will not allow a player to drive a circuit the same way in wet-weather conditions as in dry-weather conditions. The braking zone for all but the gentlest of corners will need to be extended, or else the car risks to hydroplane itself off the pavement. Throttle management is also key in wet-conditions racing. Due to the water (and perhaps even puddles) on the circuit or stage, there is inherently less tire grip, so strong acceleration is more likely to cause undue wheelspin - which could in turn spin the car and create a collision. If a car has gone off the raceway, then the sand and/or grass which collect on the tires provide absolutely NO traction at all, so just the act of getting back to the pavement will likely result in numerous spins. In general, cornering is more difficult in wet conditions than in dry conditions. To help ease this difficulty in cornering, simulation-style games will sometimes allow the player to change the car's tuning during a race (if not, the player will be forced to try to survive using the tuning set- up chosen before the beginning of the race). Tuning is covered in more detail in another section above, but the main aspect to change for wet-weather conditions is to raise the downforce at the front and/or rear of the car; this will help improve cornering ability, but will result in slower top-end speed and slower acceleration. If the car's brake strength can be adjusted, it should be lowered, as strong braking will raise the likelihood of hydroplaning off the pavement; lowering brake strength will also mean an additional lengthening of the braking zone for all but the gentlest corners of a given circuit. ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== STAGE OVERVIEWS The stage overviews are presented in the order presented in Time Attack Mode. For each country (remember that this game treats all of Africa as a single 'country'), only the four forward-configuration stages are listed in this section; the player can sort things out for the reverse configuration of each stage :-) Note that driving instructions are not included in these stage overviews; that would most definitely defeat the purpose of even playing a rally-based racing game, which relies HEAVILY upon the navigator's instructions. Also, all pre-contract team vehicle tests in V-Rally Mode (the game's career mode) and all challenges in Challenge Mode use only the first four sectors of a given stage, not the full six stages. Finland Stage 1 Sector 1 This opening sector primarily runs through a wooded area; the muddy roadway is nice and wide, allowing for a good amount of recovery room should a driver overcommit to a corner. A small farmlike area and a group of excited fans are on the left of the roadway just before the beginning of Sector 2. Sector 2 Shortly beyond the farmlike area, the left side of the roadway 'opens' as the roadway passes alongside a beautiful, serene lake. After a right-hand corner, a second body of water appears on the right side of the roadway briefly before the stage runs through an area of small mounds. Sector 3 Beginning where the mounds end, the first part of the third sector sees a return of the wooded area on the right side of the roadway while a vast rolling grassy area appears on the left. About halfway through the stage, a lake appears on the right side of the roadway, and the various signs of logging appear alongside the roadway - providing extra obstacles. Sector 4 There is an abrupt transition here from mud to gravel. The roadway narrows a bit and an uphill run begins with the hairpin corner. Drivers must take care here, as a cliff face runs up against the roadway on the right, and there is a nice vehicle- damaging drop on the right-side looking out briefly over a beautiful, serene lake. The roadway quickly re-enters the woods, and throngs of fans on either side of the roadway signal the end of Sector 4 ahead. Sector 5 For this entire sector, there are woods on the left and a wide rolling grassy area on the right. Just at the end of the sector, spectators once again line the roadway. Sector 6 For this entire sector, there are woods on the left and a wide rolling grassy area on the right. Just at the end of the stage, spectators once again line the roadway. Stage 2 Sector 1 The gravel roadway is nicely wide, much like the opening sectors of Stage 1. Similar to the beginning of Stage 1, the roadway runs through a wooded area, although seemingly a bit more dense in Stage 2 than in Stage 1. Sector 2 Shortly after the beginning of Sector 2, the roadway transitions to soft gravel, which is a darker, grayish color. The woods go away, but there are still plenty of trees and spectators and other obstacles to damage wayward vehicles. Sector 3 Sector 3 transitions back to gravel. For the first half of the sector, the woods are thick on the left side of the roadway while the right side is a bit more open; the second half has the roadway flanked by the thick woods on both sides. Sector 4 With a transition back to soft gravel, the woods end and the roadway passes through a small semi-rural town filled with eager spectators. Sector 5 Still on the soft gravel, the town gives way and it is somewhat open on both sides of the roadway, but the fans on the left side are held back by fencing. Eventually, the roadway re-enters the wooded area, makes a sharp turn, and crosses a wooden bridge over a small river, remaining in the woods on the other side of the river. Sector 6 The woods suddenly give way and the final sector runs past several barns. There are a number of eager spectators on both sides of the roadway. Stage 3 Sector 1 This all-gravel stage begins with a thick wooded area to the left of the roadway and a short grassy area leading toward a large lake to the right. About two-thirds of the way through the stage, the signs of logging are visible, providing a few extra obstacles for wayward vehicles. Sector 2 The wooded area to the left side of the roadway gives way to a more open area. Shortly into this second sector, there is a long fence on the left side of the roadway, followed by cheering fans kept back behind barriers. Just before the end of the sector, the roadway passes between some tall dunes. Sector 3 Passing through more dunes, the roadway soon runs along the shore of a lake (to the left side of the roadway); there is also a short bridge, so drivers must take care to not hit its edges. Sector 4 Sector 4 begins shortly beyond the bridge and features the lake on the left and the thick wooded area on the right of the roadway. A barn signals the end of the sector. Sector 5 Beginning parallel with the red barn on the right side of the roadway, the first half of Sector 5 is located within the thick wooded area. The remainder of the sector returns to the shore of the lake. Sector 6 The final sector begins by running alongside the lake (with some signs of logging), then turns away from the lake and heads into the wooded area, with the trees becoming thicker and thicker. Stage 4 Sector 1 The entire opening sector takes place in a wooded area. The roadway is fairly wide, so drivers should not have too much trouble recovering from any mistakes. Sector 2 The first part of this second sector has a sheer cliff face directly against the roadway on the left, and a significant drop on the right side; the roadway will quickly come down to the bottom of this drop. Shortly afterward, the roadway is flanked on the left side by thick woods, whereas the right side is a bit more open and offers glimpses of yet another lake. Sector 3 Shortly into Sector 3, the woods appear on the right side of the roadway with the left side being a bit more open. This sector is greatly littered with evidence of logging, which can cause problems in several corners. Sector 4 The woods return again on the left side of the roadway while the lake makes another appearance on the right side. The last half of the sector takes place entirely in the woods. Sector 5 The first half of this penultimate sector runs through the woods. The final half opens up a bit, then passes between some dunes. Sector 6 This final sector is shorter than the others. The sector opens with the roadway running through a small rural community, then finishes in the woods. France Stage 1 Sector 1 Stage 1 begins high up on a mountain, so this opening sector is largely a downhill run. The roadway has essentially been chiseled out of the mountain stone, so there are often tall rock faces flush against the roadway - however, there are brief moments when one or both sides of the roadway will open up a bit with a small grassy area. There is also a rock tunnel near the end of this opening sector. Sector 2 Continuing the long downhill trajectory of the stage, large rock formations flank the roadway in the initial portion of this sector. The roadway then passes through a small town, where an ascent begins. Sector 3 Beginning just after leaving a French village, this sector begins with an uphill slope which runs through an even smaller village. About halfway through the stage, a descent begins anew, with the roadway flanked by tall rock formations. Sector 4 This sector runs around two bays while maintaining a downhill trajectory. To some extent, it is possible to see where the roadway is far ahead on the other side of the bay. Tall rock formations flank the roadway on the left; to the right is the water (the bays), and there is not usually a guardrail to keep vehicles from flying off the mountain and into the water below. Sector 5 A slow, long ascent begins with Sector 5. Much of this sector is more open, with grass on either side of the roadway. However, the sector eventually runs through yet another French town. Here, it is important to keep off the sidewalks, as there is no gentle slope or lip to them as there are with the rumble strips at actual race circuits (such as Circuit Dijon-Prenois); therefore, hitting a sidewalk at high speed (especially with a hard suspension setting, which is generally recommended for asphalt surfaces) will quite likely result in the vehicle bouncing into the air, meaning a loss of control and significantly increasing the chances of an accident. Sector 6 This sector begins in the sidewalked village, but quickly leaves the village for a downhill run flanked closely by rock formations on both sides of the roadway. Stage 2 Sector 1 The all-asphalt roadway is wide enough for two-way traffic under normal circumstances, but high-speed cornering could be a problem for those drivers unable to keep a tight racing line. The right side of the roadway is lined with rock formations. The left side is mostly open, but there are a number of rock formations, trees, and other obstacles - usually in key areas - to provide problems for 'wandering' vehicles. Sector 2 This sector features a roadway closely bounded on both sides, either by rock outcroppings or by steep embankments. The very end of the sector hosts 'The Castle,' which features several SHARP corners and a very narrow passageway/tunnel right where Sector 2 meets Sector 3. Sector 3 There are a few more SHARP corners, then the roadway heads back into the mountains. The roadway is again closely bounded on both sides, so precision cornering is key to success here. Sector 4 Again, the roadway is closely bounded on both sides for much of the sector. However, on the right side just before Sector 5, there is a gap in the fence which holds back the spectators; this gap is just large enough for a vehicle to slip through if the preceding corner is taken too wide and too quickly. Sector 5 While there is plenty to wreck a wayward vehicle on either side of the roadway, the right side does open up a bit to provide some nice scenic views... but admiring the scenery will result in the near-total destruction of the vehicle :-( The right side is often - but not always - blocked by some sort of guardrail. Sector 6 This extremely-short sector is essentially just like Sector 5. Stage 3 Sector 1 Starting high up on a mountainside, Sector 1 begins by running through a small French village. The second half of this opening sector features a guardrail on the right side of the roadway and large mountain cliffs on the left side. Sector 2 This is identical to the second half of Sector 1, but with more sharp corners. Sector 3 This is much like Sector 2, but with even MORE sharp corners and a tiny village near the end of the sector. The descent also seems a little steeper overall in this sector. Sector 4 This is one long, steep descent with mostly-gentle corners, so those using a high gear ratio can make use of its higher top-end speed here - so long as all cornering is EXTREMELY precise. Sector 5 The sector begins with a bridge over a stream, then the roadway begins a long uphill run among twisty corners. There is NO room for error in this sector. Sector 6 This continues the pattern begun in Sector 5. The stage comes to an end about 300 meters beyond the second tunnel. Stage 4 Sector 1 This stage begins in a mountain village; drivers must try to keep off the sidewalks, as hitting them at high speeds is quite likely to send the vehicle airborne, meaning a loss of control and a greater possibility of an accident. Once out of the small village, there is even less room for error with cliffs and trees and other obstacles flanking the roadway. Only precision driving will provide success here!!! Sector 2 Continuing down the mountainside, there is not much room for error at all, much like the end of the opening sector. After the second hairpin corner, the right side is guarded only by a guardrail, but even then it is still possible to miss the beginning of the guardrail and plunge toward the bay far below. Sector 3 With the bay to the right and rock walls to the left, the descent continues for just a moment before the elevation essentially levels. There are a few rock tunnels in this sector. The view out across the water is definitely beautiful, but any attempts to enjoy the scenery will result in the destruction of the vehicle!!! Sector 4 The first half of the stage is fairly level, then the overall elevation begins to drop again. The roadway leaves the first bay and then runs along a second bay, much like Stage 1. Sector 5 Transitioning to poor asphalt, the second bay is quickly left behind as the roadway runs along the mountainside. Trees, rock formations, and other obstacles await wayward vehicles. The corners here are generally not very tight, so good speeds can be attained here. Sector 6 Once past the waterfall, the roadway ascends slowly. There is still no room for error. The stage ends as the second bay far below again comes into view. England Stage 1 Sector 1 This all-mud stage can be tricky due to the lack of traction, especially when attempting strong acceleration out of tight corners or at the start of the stage. This opening sector runs through the woods. At the end of the sector, a building in a clearing can be seen just ahead. Sector 2 Sector 2 begins in a clearing, passing by a building on the left. This area is used for logging; as such, there are plenty of logs, trucks, and other obstacles scattered about. The roadway will curve around all this, then return to the woods momentarily to emerge with a farm on the left (protected by a long fence) and eventually passing through a small village. Sector 3 Once past the few buildings of the village, the roadway returns to the woods. The sector ends at the next clearing. Sector 4 The fourth sector is somewhat open, although tall embankments and trees generally line the roadway. There are many fans perched along the roadway in this sector. Sector 5 The first part of this sector runs through the woods, with a building and a group of spectators on the right side of the roadway early in the sector. Once across the wooden bridge, the right side of the roadway is flanked by a long semi-steep grassy embankment. Sector 6 The final sector is quite open on both sides, but with numerous tight corners, some of which have obstacles at the apex to thwart any attempts at shortcutting. There are numerous spectators along this last sector, all protected by fencing or other barriers. Stage 2 Sector 1 This opening sector runs through the woods. The roadway is fairly wide, providing plenty of room for recovery in case of a minor mistake. The entire sector runs slowly downhill, but there are too many corners to allow for much high-speed driving. Sector 2 The long downhill run continues, with even tighter corners (in general) than in the opening sector. The end of the sector is another logging area, so any off-course excursions could result in vehicle damage. Sector 3 Still in a semi-wooded area, there are a number of spectators along much of this sector. Drivers must beware the barriers on the stone bridge at the end of this sector. Sector 4 This semi-wooded area is also characterized by tight corners. Fencing in the last two-thirds of the sector protects many spectators and also prevents any shortcutting possibilities. Sector 5 The roadway continues winding through the semi- wooded area. The main 'obstacle' here is a river crossing; those using lower-than-default Ride Height settings will definitely need to slow for the river crossing, or else the vehicle will bottom out and potentially create a loss of control. Sector 6 The woods thicken as the final sector runs uphill. The right side of the roadway is initially protected by a long guardrail. Near the end of the stage is another building (on the left) surrounded by signs of logging, and a nice throng of spectators await the drivers at the end of the stage. Stage 3 Special Weather Note At least in Time Attack Mode, this stage is run in foggy conditions, which makes clear visibility almost impossible. This can make it quite difficult to correctly judge distances between a navigator's call and the associated corner or obstacle. Therefore, special caution must be made here; however, this is one of the best stages in the game to truly attack and gain a major lead over the competition in V-Rally Mode. Sector 1 Stage 3 opens in the woods, although the roadway is fairly wide at most points. Near the end of this initial sector is a river crossing; it is best to slow for the river crossing to avoid a loss of vehicle control. Sector 2 Heading uphill, the roadway gains more tight twists and turns. Sector 3 This third sector is more open on either side of the roadway, but there are still plenty of trees and rocks (as well as some fans) to provide incentive to remain firmly ON the roadway. Sector 4 This sector transitions from woods to clearing and back to woods, with a bridge thrown in. About halfway through the sector is a think-log fence on the right side; this fence is breakable, and it is thus possible to have a collision with something normally protected by the fence. Sector 5 The first half of this sector has the woods on the right side of the roadway, with an open area on the left side; the left side also sports a few buildings and several groups of spectators. The second half of the sector is run fully in the woods. Sector 6 This final sector emerges from the woods into a logging area, with several groups of stacked logs near the roadway. The roadway then re-enters the woods for the final run to the end of the stage. Stage 4 Sector 1 This opening sector is wide open on both sides of the roadway, but there are still a number of trees and rocks near the roadway on either side. The sector ends near the top of a crest. Sector 2 This second sector slowly climbs the mountainside. There are several tall rock embankments and stone guardrails in this sector. However, the main danger is the steep ditch on the left side of the roadway at one point; slipping into this ditch will DEFINITELY create vehicle damage. Sector 3 Running through the woods, there is a small logging area early in the sector, and many lengthy guardrails throughout the sector. Near the end of this third sector, the woods on the right side of the roadway give way to a view of the countryside. Sector 4 The first half of the sector returns to the woods, then the second half of the sector opens to grassy plains to the right side of the roadway. This is a relatively-short sector overall. Sector 5 The first half of this penultimate sector runs through the woods, emerging to the woods on the left side of the roadway and a logging operation on the right side. Sector 6 This final sector runs slowly uphill and is fairly open on both sides of the roadway. The stage comes to an end just beyond the wooden bridge. Sweden Special Border Note Virtually every millimeter of roadway in the Sweden stages is bounded on both sides by a bank of snow from where the snowplows have 'cleared' the roadway. In some sectors, these snow banks are taller than in other sectors. Thus, for the most part, it is virtually impossible to leave the roadway, as these snow banks will almost always force the vehicle to bounce back across the roadway toward the other snow bank. Stage 1 Sector 1 This opening sector is mostly wide open on both sides of the roadway, with plenty of spectators in the first half of the stage. Sector 2 This second sector runs entirely through a lightly- wooded area. Sector 3 The trees thin somewhat in this sector, which features some tight corners to slow the vehicle's average speed. Sector 4 The roadway passes alongside a farming area in this sector. Sector 5 The area slowly opens on either side of the roadway to provide a nice panoramic view of the surroundings. Sector 6 While the sector begins in the vast clear panoramic area, the roadway quickly returns to the woods, where the corners become tighter and tighter. Stage 2 Sector 1 There are A LOT of spectators at the start of this very short sector. The area is mostly clear and open, providing a nice distant view to either side of the roadway. Sector 2 The first two-thirds of this second sector is nice and open, with a significant throng of spectators about one-third of the way through this sector. The roadway then re-enters the woods. Sector 3 The first half of this sector runs through the woods, with A LOT of spectators lining the left side of the roadway. The final segment of the sector opens up on either side of the roadway. Sector 4 The first half of the fourth sector is in a wide open area, with the second half taking place back in the wooded area. Sector 5 This somewhat-short penultimate sector runs entirely through the woods. Sector 6 This final sector runs entirely through the woods and features some tricky corner combinations. Stage 3 Sector 1 The opening sector of Stage 3 is rather lengthy, and the snow banks on either side of the roadway are rather high. Trees line the roadway throughout much of the sector, but there is a brief moment of openness to either side of the roadway about halfway through the sector. Sector 2 For much of the second sector, the left side of the roadway is immediately bounded by rock embankments. A pair of 'jumps' ends the sector, with Sector 3 beginning at the crest of the second 'jump.' Sector 3 This is a rather easy, high-speed sector, with plenty of trees and spectators along the roadway. One section has the roadway bounded by more rocks. Sector 4 Sector 4 is mostly open, and is a great place for a full-throttle high-speed run. Telephone poles line the left side of the roadway, and can therefore be used as a great device for anticipating the placement of the upcoming corners. Sector 5 Again, this is a high-speed sector, with telephone poles available for corner anticipation. A large red covered bridge appears about halfway through the stage, just after the telephone poles move from the left side of the roadway to the right side. Sector 6 This final sector runs through wide-open farmland, with plenty of spectators lining the roadway (on the opposite side of the snowbanks). The final sector also transitions quickly to ice. Stage 4 Sector 1 Spectators spectators everywhere!!!!! This opening sector is wide open on both sides of the roadway, with hordes of spectators seemingly as far as the eye can see, especially near the Starting Line. Sector 2 This is essentially like the first sector, but with tighter corners and fewer spectators. Sector 3 This is essentially like the second sector, but with even tighter corners. Sector 4 This is essentially like the third sector, but on snowy gravel. Sector 5 The roadway keeps transitioning between snowy gravel and deep snow. Sector 6 The trees and the spectators both become much more numerous in this sector as the corners get tighter and tighter. Germany Stage 1 Sector 1 Beginning on snowy asphalt, this stage primarily has tall rocks on the right side of the roadway and either guardrails or trees on the left side. The sector ends halfway through the tunnel. Sector 2 This is much the same as the opening sector, but without the snow on much of the roadway and some rock barriers on the left side of the roadway. Sector 3 This is much like Sector 2. Sector 4 Here, the rocks give way to trees on either side of the roadway for the first half of the sector, then the mountain rocks and a tunnel return in the second half of the sector. The sector ends just beyond the tunnel. Sector 5 This is much like the opening sector, but without the snow on the asphalt. About two-thirds of the way through the sector, the roadway passes underneath a ski lift :-) Sector 6 This final uphill run sees snow lightly covering the roadway. This is in many respects just like the opening sector. Stage 2 Sector 1 The stage begins in a lightly-wooded area, but eventually a guardrail on the right side of the roadway prevents vehicles from falling off the short but sheer drop into the river below. Sector 2 Now away from the river, there are rock embankments along much of the roadway in this second sector, as well as many signs of logging - some of which are rather close to the roadway. Sector 3 The rocks give way to a lightly-wooded area. Soon, a rail line appears on the right side of the roadway, and there may be a railroad engine used for logging slowly moving along. However, the roadway soon turns away from the rail line, ending this third sector. Sector 4 Beginning bounded by rocks and trees, this sector turns back toward the rail line, then turns away again. The sector ends just before reaching the town ahead. Sector 5 Much of this penultimate sector runs through a fan-filled town. The entryway to the town is a minor tunnel, and there are sidewalks along the roadway which could cause a vehicle to bounce and lose control if hit at high speeds. The roadway eventually leaves the town, heading back out into the woods (with a brief segment bounded on both sides by tall rock embankments). Sector 6 This is a fairly-open sector, with mostly gentle corners conducive to a high-speed run. There are also numerous fans (in groups) along the roadway in this final sector. The stage ends shortly beyond the building on the left. Stage 3 Sector 1 This stage begins in a lightly-wooded area, but then the trees give way to rock embankments. The sector ends just before the pile of logs on the left side of the roadway. Sector 2 Primarily trees bound the roadway in this sector, but there are also a significant number of steep embankments (primarily rocks). Some fans can be seen in this sector, and the few signs of logging are fortunately well away from the roadway itself. Sector 3 This is primarily a light-wooded sector, with some steep embankments (primarily grassy) in some areas. Sector 4 This is primarily a light-wooded sector, with some steep embankments (primarily rocky) in some areas. The roadway transitions to icy asphalt at the end of the sector. Sector 5 The first half of this penultimate sector is lined with tall rock embankments or even cliffs, and the corners are many and somewhat sharp. The second half of the sector opens up a bit, but there are still A LOT of trees lining the roadway. Sector 6 This final sector begins the way Sector 5 ends, but then returns to rocky cliffs. There is also a tunnel near the end of the stage. Stage 4 Special Weather Note At least in Time Attack Mode, this stage is run in foggy conditions, which makes clear visibility almost impossible. This can make it quite difficult to correctly judge distances between a navigator's call and the associated corner or obstacle. Therefore, special caution must be made here; however, this is one of the best stages in the game to truly attack and gain a major lead over the competition in V-Rally Mode. Sector 1 The opening sector of this stage runs through vineyards and is LOADED with nasty, sharp corners. Those drivers who can deftly handle these corners will have a great advantage over the competition (in V-Rally Mode) heading into Sector 2. Sector 2 This second sector runs initially through more vineyards with tight corners, then heads into the woods. Those drivers who can deftly handle these corners will have a great advantage over the competition (in V-Rally Mode) heading into Sector 3. Sector 3 As this sector progresses, there are more and more rock embankments flanking the roadway, with each embankment seemingly taller than the one before it. Sector 4 The fourth sector opens up a bit, then passes by several buildings and groups of spectators. The second half of the sector runs between tall rock embankments. Sector 5 The roadway here runs through a lightly-wooded area, with spectators in the small clearings. There are also some more rock embankments. Sector 6 This final sector is much like Sector 5, but ending at another vineyard. Africa Special Visibility Note Most of the Africa stages are extremely sunny, and do not have much (if anything) nearby to block the sunlight from shining upon the roadway. This can produce severe visibility problems when heading toward the sun, and adjusting the camera view will not usually provide better visibility. In this case, it is best to try to use tall trees near the roadway to anticipate upcoming corners. Stage 1 Sector 1 There are A LOT of spectators lining the roadway in this initial sector. While the corners are not at all difficult, the apexes often have small rises which are just tall enough to knock the vehicle out of control. Some apexes are flat, but just sandy enough to seriously slow the vehicle. Sector 2 The first two-thirds of this sector are essentially like the opening sector, although the embankments alongside the roadway tend to get progressively taller. However, the final third of the sector has some nasty corners between these tall embankments, which can potentially cause some trouble. Sector 3 There are fewer embankments in this third sector, and the corners are not quite as sharp as before. However, it is still easy to stray off the roadway and damage the vehicle. Sector 4 The second corner of this sector is by far the most difficult in all of the Africa stages, with a cliff face essentially protruding into the roadway from the right side, and a unguarded catastrophic descent on the left side of the roadway. Once past this nasty corner, the roadway tends to run along the plateau, with embankments and spectators on both sides of the roadway. Sector 5 This penultimate sector is really one super-lengthy straightaway, with only one true corner; with precision steering, even this corner can be safely cleared at full-throttle acceleration. This sector ends just before the wooden archway. Sector 6 This short sector is a high-speed run to the Finish Line. However, straightlining the many gentle corners is not a good idea, as the grass at the apex of each corner will slow the vehicle significantly. Stage 2 Sector 1 Many embankments and trees line the roadway throughout this opening sector. Sector 2 The many corners come fast and furious in this sector. There is also a railroad crossing, almost directly underneath the point where the telephone lines cross over the roadway. Sector 3 Much of this sector runs along a twisty, narrow plateau. There is NO room for error, as the tall cliff face bounds the roadway on the left side, and the right side is a severe drop to the valley floor far below. There are also trees and embankments strategically placed on the left side of the roadway to create more concern for those drivers who slide to the outside in the left-hand corners. Sector 4 Now off the plateau, the roadway is primarily bounded by more embankments, although the corners are not quite as severe here. Sector 5 The corners are more gentle here as the roadway leads up to a wooden bridge. Once across the bridge, the roadway winds through a tiny village filled with spectators. Ahead is a second railroad crossing, but a vehicle with sufficient speed and the correct suspension setting can easily speed up the slight slope and jump over the railroad crossing without any need to slow to more safely cross the tracks. Sector 6 Embankments and minor ditches characterize this closing sector, which is also heavily lined with cheering spectators. Stage 3 Sector 1 Until the very end of the sector, this is a very high-speed run with only the gentlest of corners. Embankments and trees line the roadway in this sector. There is also a shallow river crossing quite early in the sector, but it can easily be cleared at full acceleration. Sector 2 This is another very high-speed run, with more embankments and trees lining the roadway. Sector 3 Here, the roadway runs along a shallow lake bed. There are the usual trees and embankments. Sector 4 In this short sector, the roadway climbs up a rather narrow plateau. There is a sheer cliff face bounding the roadway (and sometimes protruding slightly into it) on the right side, and some unprotected drops on the left side of the roadway. Sector 5 In this short sector, the roadway descends back to the valley floor and also contains a wider shallow river crossing. Sector 6 The first half of this final sector runs along the shallow lake bed again, then heads away from the lake. The corners are rather gentle, making this sector a rather high-speed run to the Finish Line. Stage 4 Sector 1 With the exception of one corner, this is yet another high-speed run through the desert. However, care must be taken to not slide off the roadway, as the grass will significantly slow vehicles. Sector 2 This is yet another high-speed run, but with some embankments and trees closer to the roadway. Sector 3 This is YET ANOTHER high-speed run, with some taller embankments and more trees. Some spectators await by the building on the right side of the roadway about halfway through this sector. Sector 4 The weeds on either side of the roadway are taller now, slowing stray vehicles even more quickly. Sector 5 Except for one 'chicane,' this is another high-speed run. Sector 6 There are practically no embankments here, but still plenty of trees and grass along this rather short final sector. The Finish Line is about halfway along the final corner called by the navigator. ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== VEHICLE SET-UPS: OVERVIEW The vehicle set-ups suggested here are based upon my own highly-aggressive driving style, and thus may not work for every player. In general, I tend to use very high brake strength (biased very closely to the rear of the vehicle) so that I can go much deeper into corners before braking. I also tend to straightline corners as much as possible, especially when on a long downhill run (primarily on gravel or asphalt), for which I also rarely use any braking. Many tuning options for parts have a graph with a given number of squares, with the center square slightly larger than the others. For the purposes of simplicity, this guide treats this larger center square as 0 (zero, or neutral). A positive number means that the given part should be tuned that many numbers to the right of the center circle (i.e., a '+2' means that the player should move the right-most colored circle two positions to the right of the center circle), while a negative number means that the given part should be tuned that many numbers to the left of the center circle (i.e., a '-2' means that the player should move the right- most colored circle two positions to the left of the center circle). Note that these tuning suggestions do not include the driving-specific tuning options, as those are very much player-dependent options, and are also global to V-Rally 3. The main tuning options will need to be reconfigured for each stage in V-Rally 3 in order to maximize vehicle performance. Also, in V-Rally Mode (the game's career mode), there will often be times when the player must successfully complete two or more rally stages before arriving at a Service Area to repair any damages and tune the car for the next set of stages. The tuning set-ups suggested here are viable for only a single stage, so the player will likely be forced to make some potentially-difficult decisions when running consecutive stages without a Service Area; for example: 1.) If the first stage has 85% mud and 15% wet gravel, and the second stage has 100% loose gravel, which tire compound is best to produce lower times across the combined stages? 2.) If the first stage has numerous tight, twisty corners with virtually no straightaways between them, and the second stage has only very minor corners and rather lengthy straightaways, what is the best gear ratio setting to use across the combined stages? Obviously, it is not always possible to achieve a 'happy medium' between consecutive stages when the stages involved are extremely different. This is where a lot of educated guesswork comes into play. In these situations, it is very important for the player to be consciously aware or the human and vehicle limitations and strengths. Also, if the player has previously amassed a great lead (of time) over the rest of the competitors, then the player can lose a given amount of time on one stage and excel on the other by tuning 'only' for one of the stages (fully recognizing that time will be lost on the other stage, but still tuning and driving in such as manner as to attempt to minimize the time which will be lost in this endeavor). ============================================== VEHICLE SET-UPS: 1.6L FWD CLASS The vehicle set-ups are listed here in the country order used in Time Attack Mode. Actual rallies in V-Rally Mode may appear in a different order (and with different weather conditions), and the stages used in Challenge Mode (whether playing default challenges or player-created challenges) can come from ANY country in ANY order. Remember that for the purposes of V-Rally 3, the entire continent of Africa is treated as a 'country.' Target vehicle used for 1.6L FWD Class: Citroen Sport Saxo Finland Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 front, -1 rear Ride Height +1 front, +1 rear Stabilizers 0 front, 0 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZA (Soft Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 front, -1 rear Ride Height 0 front, 0 rear Stabilizers 0 front, 0 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZB (Hard Rough Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +1 front ,+1 rear Ride Height 0 front, 0 rear Stabilizers -1 front, -1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +1 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 front, -1 rear Ride Height +1 front, +1 rear Stabilizers 0 front, 0 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength France Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 front, +2 rear Ride Height -1 front, -1 rear Stabilizers +1 front, +1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials +1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 front, +2 rear Ride Height -1 front, -1 rear Stabilizers +1 front, +1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials +1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 front, +2 rear Ride Height -1 front, -1 rear Stabilizers +1 front, +1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials +1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 front, +2 rear Ride Height -1 front, -1 rear Stabilizers +1 front, +1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials +1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength England Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +1 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Sweden Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GA (Deep Snow) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +2 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GA (Deep Snow) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +1 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GA (Deep Snow) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +1 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GA (Deep Snow) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Germany Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GS1 (Snowy Icy Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 Ride Height -1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 Ride Height -1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GS1 (Snowy Icy Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 Ride Height -1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 Ride Height -1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Africa Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZB (Hard Rough Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension 0 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +2 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZB (Hard Rough Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension 0 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +2 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZB (Hard Rough Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension 0 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +3 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZE (Loose Wet Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension 0 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +3 Differentials -1 Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength ============================================== VEHICLE SET-UPS: 2.0L 4WD CLASS The vehicle set-ups are listed here in the country order used in Time Attack Mode. Actual rallies in V-Rally Mode may appear in a different order (and with different weather conditions), and the stages used in Challenge Mode (whether playing default challenges or player-created challenges) can come from ANY country in ANY order. Remember that for the purposes of V-Rally 3, the entire continent of Africa is treated as a 'country.' Target vehicle used for 2.0L 4WD Class: Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution VII Finland Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 front, -1 rear Ride Height +1 front, +1 rear Stabilizers 0 front, 0 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZA (Soft Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 front, -1 rear Ride Height 0 front, 0 rear Stabilizers 0 front, 0 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZB (Hard Rough Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +1 front ,+1 rear Ride Height 0 front, 0 rear Stabilizers -1 front, -1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +1 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 front, -1 rear Ride Height +1 front, +1 rear Stabilizers 0 front, 0 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength France Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 front, +2 rear Ride Height -1 front, -1 rear Stabilizers +1 front, +1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials +1 front, +1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 front, +2 rear Ride Height -1 front, -1 rear Stabilizers +1 front, +1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials +1 front, +1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 front, +2 rear Ride Height -1 front, -1 rear Stabilizers +1 front, +1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials +1 front, +1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 front, +2 rear Ride Height -1 front, -1 rear Stabilizers +1 front, +1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials +1 front, +1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength England Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +1 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Sweden Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GA (Deep Snow) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +2 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GA (Deep Snow) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +1 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GA (Deep Snow) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +1 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GA (Deep Snow) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Germany Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GS1 (Snowy Icy Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 Ride Height -1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 Ride Height -1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GS1 (Snowy Icy Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 Ride Height -1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 Ride Height -1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Africa Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZB (Hard Rough Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension 0 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +2 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZB (Hard Rough Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension 0 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +2 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZB (Hard Rough Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension 0 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +3 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZE (Loose Wet Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension 0 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +3 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength ============================================== VEHICLE SET-UPS: BONUS CAR CLASS The vehicle set-ups are listed here in the country order used in Time Attack Mode. Actual rallies in V-Rally Mode may appear in a different order (and with different weather conditions), and the stages used in Challenge Mode (whether playing default challenges or player-created challenges) can come from ANY country in ANY order. Remember that for the purposes of V-Rally 3, the entire continent of Africa is treated as a 'country.' Target vehicle used for Bonus Car Class: Subaru Imprezza 2000 Finland Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 front, -1 rear Ride Height +1 front, +1 rear Stabilizers 0 front, 0 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZA (Soft Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 front, -1 rear Ride Height 0 front, 0 rear Stabilizers 0 front, 0 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZB (Hard Rough Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +1 front ,+1 rear Ride Height 0 front, 0 rear Stabilizers -1 front, -1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +1 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 front, -1 rear Ride Height +1 front, +1 rear Stabilizers 0 front, 0 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength France Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 front, +2 rear Ride Height -1 front, -1 rear Stabilizers +1 front, +1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials +1 front, +1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 front, +2 rear Ride Height -1 front, -1 rear Stabilizers +1 front, +1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials +1 front, +1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 front, +2 rear Ride Height -1 front, -1 rear Stabilizers +1 front, +1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials +1 front, +1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 front, +2 rear Ride Height -1 front, -1 rear Stabilizers +1 front, +1 rear Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials +1 front, +1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength England Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type M (Muddy Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +1 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Sweden Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GA (Deep Snow) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +2 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GA (Deep Snow) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +1 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GA (Deep Snow) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +1 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GA (Deep Snow) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension -1 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio 0 Differentials -1 front, -1 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Germany Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GS1 (Snowy Icy Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 Ride Height -1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 Ride Height -1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type GS1 (Snowy Icy Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 Ride Height -1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type N (Dry Asphalt) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension +2 Ride Height -1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio -1 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Africa Stage 1 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZB (Hard Rough Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension 0 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +2 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 2 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZB (Hard Rough Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension 0 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +2 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 3 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZB (Hard Rough Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension 0 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +3 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength Stage 4 (Forward and Reverse Configurations) Tires Selection Type ZE (Loose Wet Gravel) Pressure -1 front, -1 rear Chassis Suspension 0 Ride Height +1 Stabilizers -1 Mechanics Gearbox Ratio +3 Differentials 0 front, 0 rear, 0 central Brakes -2 balance, +2 strength ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== REGULAR CARS Here are the regular (non-bonus) cars in V-Rally 3: Class Car -------- -------------------------------- 1.6L FWD Citroen Sport Saxo 1.6L FWD Punto 1.6L FWD Ford Puma 1.6L FWD Peugeot 206 1.6L 1.6L FWD Renault Sport Clio 1.6L FWD Opel Motorsport Corsa 1.6L FWD Volkswagon Racing Polo 1.6L FWD MG ZR EX258 2.0L 4WD Peugeot 206 2.0L 2.0L 4WD Subaru Imprezza 2.0L 4WD Ford Focus RS 2.0L 4WD Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution VII 2.0L 4WD Citroen Sport Xsara 2.0L 4WD Hyundai Motorsport Accent 2.0L 4WD Toyota Corolla 2.0L 4WD SEAT Sport Cordoba Telefonica ============================================== UNLOCKABLE ITEMS AND FEATURES Here are the unlockable items and features in V-Rally 3 and how they are acquired. This section is bounded by a wide expanse of blank lines so that those who do not wish to view this information can easily skip over this section. Car*/** Acquisition -------------------- ------------------------------------- SEAT Cordoba Repsol Win Pirelli Challenge in Challenge Mode Subaru Imprezza Win 2.0L 4WD Category in V-Rally Mode Mitsubishi Lancer Win 1.6L FWD Category in V-Rally Mode Toyota Corolla Beat the default target time in ALL V-Rally stages in Time Attack Mode (this includes all the reverse stages as well) Unlockable Feature* Acquisition -------------------- ------------------------------------- Extra Challenges Win Michelin Challenge (the final (See the Extra default challenge) in Challenge Challenges Mode section for details) * Once ANY driver has unlocked any of these features or items in V-Rally 3, they can be accessed by ALL drivers. ** All bonus vehicles are 4WD vehicles. ============================================== EXTRA CHALLENGES This section covers the Extra Challenges, an unlockable features within Challenge Mode. This section is bounded by a wide expanse of blank lines so that those who do not wish to view this information can easily skip over this section. Challenge Mode comprises several vehicle-specific challenges, then a pair of tire-manufacturer challenges (in which the player can choose from a selection of permitted vehicles). Once these five default challenges have all been successfully passed, the player will unlock Extra Challenges, which allows for the creation of unique challenges using one or more vehicles selected by the player. Creating unique challenges is somewhat straightforward. First, a name can be selected on the Name screen. Permitted vehicles are then selected on the Cars screen. Damage can be toggled between Off and On. When ready, the player can select OK to move ahead. A few notes are warranted here on the selection of permitted vehicles from the Cars screen. 1.) There are four categories: All, 2.0L 4WD, 1.6L FWD, and Bonus Cars. Selecting any of these categories means that the player will only be permitted to use the vehicles in that category. This also means that if a player has not yet unlocked all the bonus cars, then she or he will be limited to those bonus cars already acquired in the game should Bonus Cars be selected. 2.) Selecting any specific vehicle means that the player will be limited to using that vehicle for the created challenge. Only those bonus cars which have already been unlocked will be available for individual selection in this manner. In the next step, the player can add stages to the created challenge. A stage in Finland is available by default, with its default time to beat listed on the far-right of the initial line; selecting this line (the first line) allows for that initial stage to be modified on a pop-up sub-screen. Here, the player can change the country (remember that the entire continent of Africa is treated as a single country in V-Rally 3), track (all forward-direction tracks for each country are listed before that country's reverse-direction tracks), and the time to beat (adjusted in 5% intervals up to a 15% differential). Adding new stages is done by selecting Add, and a new Finland-default line appears. Selecting this line allows for the player to make changes. Unfortunately, each stage has its own specified weather/lighting conditions, which cannot be changed in Extra Challenges :-( It would be quite interesting, for example, to create a challenge where ALL stages are run through Africa at nighttime, or ALL stages run in France in severe foggy conditions. Should a player later wish to edit or delete/erase a created challenge, this can be done from the Extra Challenges sub- menu. Any attempt to delete/erase a created challenge will be 'cautioned' with a verification screen. Once the player has created a challenge, it is then selectable from the Challenges: Select sub-menu. All player- created challenges will appear after the five default challenges (i.e., after the Michelin Challenge). Unfortunately, the record times for any created challenges are not shown on the Records screen, nor do they appear in a driver's Pressbook :-( ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== DIAGRAMS This section contains the diagrams referred to earlier in the guide. Ascari Chicane (at Monza): * * * * * *** * ***************** Bus Stop Chicane (Variant I - Wide Chicane): ******************* ******************* * * ********* Bus Stop Chicane (Variant II - Narrow Chicane): ******************* ******************* *********** Decreasing-radius Corner: ->******************* * * * * * * <-************************* Hairpin Corner: ->***************** * <-***************** Increasing-radius Corner: ->********************** * * * * * <-******************* J-turn ******************* * * * * Quick-flicks (Variant I - Wide Chicane): ************* * ************* Quick-flicks (Variant II - Narrow Chicane): ************* ************** Sample Circuit Using Some of the Above Corner Types Combined: ******|****** ***** * |-> * * * * ** *** * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * ******** * ** * * * * * ************ ******* * ******* Standard Corner: ******************* * * * * * * * * U-turn: ->***************** * * * <-***************** Virtual Bus Stop Chicane: +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Car #1 ->->->->->-> Car #3 Player Path: ->->->->->->-> Car #2 ->->->->->->-> +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== ONLINE RESOURCES Here are a few Internet resources for World Rally Championship, the actual FIA rally racing series which provides the basis for V-Rally 2. Infogrames (http://www.us.infogrames.com/) This is the official American Web site for Infogrames, the publisher of V-Rally 3. V-Rally 3 (http://www.V-Rally3.com/) This is the official Web site of V-Rally 3. The site is Flash-based and is available in English, French, German, Spanish, and Italian. FIA World Rally Championship - Mailing List (http://www.dusty.com.au/) Touted as "the world's biggest rally mailing list," results will be sent via e-mail for each competition. Rally-Live.com (http://rally.racing-live.com/en/) This site - available in English, French, and Spanish - includes rally news and images, information on drivers and teams, regulations, information on each racing venue, an online store, forums and chat capabilities, wallpapers, screensavers, and more. RallyForum (http://www.rallyforum.com/) This is primarily an online discussion area for everything related to World Rally Championship. RallyRallyRally (http://www.rallyrallyrally.com/) This site covers World Rally Championship, British Rally, European Rally, American Rally, and Asia/Pacific Rally news. World Rallying (http://www.worldrally.net/) This site is an independent source for information on World Rally Championship, including results for every season since 1994 and an online discussion area. ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== CONTACT INFORMATION For questions, rants, raves, comments of appreciation, etc., or to be added to my e-mail list for updates to this driving guide, please contact me at: FEATHER7@IX.NETCOM.COM; also, if you have enjoyed this guide and feel that it has been helpful to you, I would certainly appreciate a small donation via PayPal (http://www.paypal.com/) using the above e-mail address. To find the latest version of this and all my other PSX/PS2/DC/Mac game guides, visit FeatherGuides at http://feathersites.angelcities.com/ ============================================== ============================================== ============================================== ======================================================================= Wolf Feather Jamie Stafford ======================================================================= Just as there are many parts needed to make a human a human, there's a remarkable number of things needed to make an individual what they are. - Major Kusanagi, _Ghost in the Shell_ ======================================================================= What isn't remembered never happened. - _Serial Experiments Lain_ =======================================================================