Google+

Aeon Flux review

AT A GLANCE
  • Excellent production design
  • Nicely captures mood of the MTV shorts
  • Aeon's moves are pretty slick
  • Not enough game
  • Too much repetition, no real progress
  • Action stutters and camera isn't helpful

First off, Majesco’s movie tie-in ... isn't. This third-person action game doesn't replay events of the Aeon Flux movie. Sure, it lays a gloss of Charlize Theron in slick vinyl over everything, but at heart, it throws back instead to the old MTV cartoon series for its personality, artistic sense, and level designs.

True, Aeon’s skills and abilities are pretty cool. She leaps nimbly around with almost Spider-Man-like agility, wields various gadgets, rolls shiny globes around (it's cooler than it sounds. Think Metroid Prime or Super Monkey Ball), whups bad guys' asses with cool acrobatic moves, and even bungie jumps hundreds, sometimes thousands of feet. 

The trouble is that Aeon gives it all up a bit too readily. There's no real difference between the second level and the last one. You never earn any new skills, abilities, or weapons. You've got 'em all already. The designer (Terminal Reality, which gave us the similar "chick with guns" series BloodRayne ) does break up the action/platform gameplay with a few puzzles, those sphere-rolling sections, and some "shoot things with the turret" missions, but you’ve still seen almost everything the game is going to show you by the time you finish level three.

That’s the real problem here: there's no sense of progress. As in the original animated show, Aeon dies at the end of every level. When the next level begins, her next "life" picks up somewhere else completely - which means you’re pretty much starting over again from square one. Granted, this repetition neatly communicates the nihilistic, "our existence is pointless" tone of the original animated shorts. But that doesn’t make it especially fun to play.



It’s worth pointing out just how terrific the game looks, including a startlingly recognizable 3D version of the Goddess Theron and places where the production design pulls off the "gleaming urban sprawl thing" on a jaw-dropping scale. However, all those sprawling vistas and the ever-expanding cadre of enemies who inhabit them also mean plentiful moments of slowdown.
Finally, redundant or not, it’s also worth pointing out that the whole game only takes ten hours - tops - to finish, and honestly, that’s just long enough before the tedium begins to set in. Heck, as a rental, Aeon Flux would actually be a painless way to waste an evening or two.

More Info

Available Platforms: Xbox, PS2
Genre: Action
Published by: Majesco
Developed by: Terminal Reality
ESRB Rating:
Teen: Violence

0 comments

Join the Discussion
Add a comment (HTML tags are not allowed.)
Characters remaining: 5000

OR…

Connect with Facebook

Log in using Facebook to share comments, games, status update and other activity easily with your Facebook feed.